279Ideas
Wait! Your vote is pending.
1,000 Mentors for Students: Build a Greater City of Angels with 826LA!
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles students attend some of the most overcrowded schools in the United States. With so many students in their classrooms, teachers are unable to offer the one-on-one time that is crucial for young people. 826LA seeks to give students the individual attention they need to become effective learners, confident leaders, and engaged citizens. 826LA’s project will do this by inspiring over 1,000 citizens to get involved in our community and mentor local students. Even a few hours of volunteer time can have a huge impact on a child: studies show that with 35-40 hours of tutoring, a student can increase his or her reading by an entire grade level! Beyond the educational boon to students, this project will benefit the whole city by encouraging a culture of compassion. The impact of helping others is significant: studies show that volunteering reduces stress and alleviates depression. The impact of receiving help can be transformative, too. Students will grow up knowing that they are an important part of a community that cares about them. Volunteers become mentors to the children they work with, and, by modeling good citizenship, they will teach children that giving back is just part of what we do in Los Angeles. Our vision of a connected future starts today. The more we volunteer in 2013, the more we perpetuate this cycle of giving. And by 2050, today’s students will become tomorrow’s mentors for a new generation of Angelinos.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
100 in 100: Skid Row Innovates!
100 in 100: Skid Row Innovates!
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

SHORT-TERM IMPACT :: New York's Times Square ended homelessness by starting with the anchors and strategically providing housing for them. In this beta test, we will be housing 100 persons from Skid Row who have been homeless for years, many for 10 years+. LONG-TERM IMPACT :: The real impact, though, will come from taking this system of matching and applying it County-wide. This will result in: * Light in the Tunnel: This system will allow our homeless providers to work effectively at ending homelessness. If you can imagine having to book a flight without Expedia, that is effectively what it feels like for case managers to try to find housing for their clients today. * Cost Savings: Chronically homeless Angelenos consume 75% of the $875 million in public resources that go toward homelessness. Local studies have shown that being able to offer them permanent supportive housing in a more strategic and targeted way will cost us 40% less. * Lower Vacancies: Having a real-time list of housing and homeless persons desiring housing will ensure that our valuable housing resources don’t sit unoccupied for a second longer than necessary. * Housing Resources: The promise of such systems, in terms of reduced costs, improved targeting and enhanced outcomes, is so dramatic that HUD has asked all communities to create and implement these systems. HUD is more likely to offer housing resources to communities with such systems infusing more capital for housing into our region. * Civic Pride: Shedding the label of being the homeless capital will allow others to see the other valuable assets Los Angeles has to offer the world.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
25 Aquaponic Farms in 25 Schools
25 Aquaponic Farms in 25 Schools 6 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

OPEN SPACE IS FARM SPACE: Enough unused land exists in LA to feed LA. If we considered just the 5000 acres of asphalt that LAUSD owns and converted 4% (200 acres) of that to aquaponic farms, we could put a salad on EVERY Angelino’s plate EVERY day of the year. The revenue the School District could earn would radically change the face of public education. Imagine teachers paid a fair wage, students learning useful vocational training, schools nourishing the minds and bodies of our youth, and communities benefiting from neighborhood farms and schools – the way LA used to be. Evo Farm offers a profound stepping-stone to get us there. REDUCTION OF CHRONIC DISEASES: Almost all of the diseases we face are not only preventable but also reversible. They can be turned on and off based on what we eat and what we don’t. In the US, we spend as much on these diseases as we spend on defense ($700 Billion annually). A path towards reducing these costs opens the door to happier, healthier world. Children who are involved in growing vegetables will eat vegetables and are more likely to raise their children to do the same. Evo Farm will teach them to turn our food deserts into food oases. WATER EFFICIENCIES: Some people still question the validity of climate change, but the reduction of available freshwater on the planet is undisputed. Last year was probably the worst year for agriculture on record due to drought (and extreme temperature). Aquaponics offers extreme water efficiencies (95% more efficient than conventional ag) and opens the door to a reliable food source. Many of these farms can operate largely on existing rainfall (only possible with aquaponics) that LA receives annually coupled with the steady stream of the LA River. Evo Farm is creating fully functioning, scalable micro- farms demonstrating the greater potential. URBAN FARMING IS JOBS: Training the future farmers of America is essential. Captivating them with exciting green-tech (triple bottom line), income potential ensures we have an able and willing labor force to do this essential work. It is not just about plants and animals, it is about marketing, IT, business development, finance, accounting, supply chain management, customer relationship management, local manufacturing, engineering, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Urban farming drives a local and resilient economy. A return to our agrarian roots is the single greatest step we can accomplish to allow for the health of individuals, health of communities and health of the planet.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
36 Hours in L.A. 2050
36 Hours in L.A. 2050 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>By creating an independent space for thinking about what ‘36 hours in L.A. 2050’ will look like in the future, the project will generate concrete visions around places and experiences that reflect ideas, conversation and collaborations towards a general consciousness of L.A. in 2050. </p> <p>Whatever unfolds here continues to heighten L.A. as a leading cultural arts capital and spurs new inventions. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
A Garden of Hope- A South LA Oasis of locally produced Vegetables and Fruits
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Negative impacts of living in a park-poor community include increased health problems and decreased quality of life. A new study found that 36% of LA children are overweight and the city’s Latino and African-American populations have higher than average rates of obesity. The cause is clearly related to the fact that they do not have access to fresh foods or safe places to exercise and recreate. Parks, gardens and farm stands play a fundamental role in the well-being of communities, providing places to play, to exercise and to access fresh produce. Public health studies of urban communities have found that parks and gardens provide residents positive and cumulative health benefits including: lower rates of obesity and diabetes; lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels; fewer minor medical complaints; lower self-reported stress levels; lower rates of crime and domestic violence; and improved air and water quality. Children living within 2/3 of a mile from a park can be up to 500% more likely to have a healthy weight, and exposure to nature can reduce stress by almost 1/3. However, without the Land Trust project, the underserved community surrounding 105th & Normandie will have little opportunity to reap these health and social benefits. Our project will provide a 1-acre green space, transforming a food desert into a neighborhood green oasis, providing a plentiful source of fresh, healthy food. We estimate serving 3,000 to 5,000 annually. Residents will have easy access to inexpensive, local and seasonal produce that can be used as the foundation for a healthy lifestyle. Children will benefit from an early introduction to healthy eating and the farm-to-table concept and explore appealing alternatives to the processed, unhealthy foods that form the majority of edible offerings in food deserts. Gardening has been demonstrated to increase children's nutrition knowledge and preference regarding fruit and vegetable consumption and to change behaviors regarding vegetable consumption. By lending a hand in the community garden and interacting with farm stand employees, children will form meaningful connections with their food and establish healthy habits from a young age. Open green spaces will enable residents to exercise and recreate in a safe environment. Economic opportunities will further benefit the community. Community garden members will be able to sell the produce they grow on-site and take financial literacy classes. The farm manager and farm stand assistant will provide employment for additional residents. Social and cultural strife are serious issues facing the 105th & Normandie community. Our project will offer opportunities for positive interactions among neighbors, who may have few occasions to get to know one another. Whether trading produce, offering gardening tips or simply sharing a bench, residents will strengthen relationships within their community.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
A High-Paying, High-Tech Jobs Solution For Those That Need It The MOST
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Highlights: Decrease the poverty rate by having more of our citizens not only employed but also employed in high paying careers Decrease the unemployment & underemployment rate in LA by training the current population to fill existing jobs Increase the number of companies & investors that choose LA as the home for their business Increase the number of new tech jobs Increase the median household income Wealth distribution is significantly more balanced across households Wealth distribution & median income increases leads to more revenue & business for other sectors of the economy More tax dollars are collected Each high tech jobs creates up to 4 other accompanying jobs The lines that defined the bifurcated economic system that exists in LA are reduced and diminished Currently, the greater LA metro area is striving to become the next Silicon Valley. In doing so, it is creating a large demand for high skilled technology workers. This makes it a critical period for the technology industry in LA. This industry cannot thrive unless there is an ample supply of qualified technical talent. Failure to support this industry will not only have a negative result on the number of tech jobs available in the area but also the number of companies that look to staff their tech departments in LA. As things stand, a variety of tech based positions will go unfilled in the coming years due to the current shortage of qualified workers. This shortage is only expected to get worse. A large STEM effort has been unleashed in the K-12 class rooms, including community colleges and four year universities. However, technology companies need trained technical staff today, not 4 to 12 years from now. Sabio will meet these demands by training individuals from LA to become entry level web programmers within 4 months. This approach is practical and feasible and currently in place in other regions of the US. The benefits to the city and area are numerous. Providing a healthy pool of technical candidates for companies will encourage them to stay & at the same time incentivize entrepreneurs and capital, of many different sources, to start their new companies here. Five years after graduating our target trainees are expected to be earning ~$100K/yr and contributing ~$58K/yr more into local economy and paying ~250% more taxes than in their previous career. Multiplying this number by 45, the number of estimated trainees in year 1, we can estimate that Sabio trainees will contribute close to $2.6M to the local economy. Finally, the Local Jobs Multiplier chart, produced by the BACEI, captures a measure of the impact any one job has on the local economy by means of supporting other local job creation. High tech jobs have been found to create jobs at a rate of 4.3, meaning that any 1 high tech job will create 4.3 other jobs. Referencing this multiplier we can estimate that Sabio will help fill 45 jobs and create, indirectly, 193 other jobs yearly.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
A Passion at Risk
A Passion at Risk 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The education community in Los Angeles is outrageously fractured. Despite many attempts to improve education in Los Angeles, we still have persistently failing schools throughout the county. Many times we look for a one size fits all solution and instead of empowering teachers, we are imposing strict rules and regulations that may or may not benefit their work with their students. Currently in LAUSD, we are about to implement a new teacher evaluation system that will likely fail to because of opposition from teachers and a lack of a clear plan from administrators. This film will highlight the need for teachers to have a voice in the changes they will be asked to implement in their classrooms.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
AEP - Arts and Cultural Environmental Certification
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

There are many benefits to adopting sustainable practices. At their museum, art gallery, theater or arts support organization, our member organizations save precious dollars through resource conservation that can be redirected toward fulfilling their missions. They increase productivity by creating a healthy workplace free of toxins and reduce their negative impact on our City and planet by reducing CO2 emissions, energy costs, material and water waste and set an important and visible example for their millions of audience and visitors to follow. In addition, the adoption of environmentally friendly business practices and attaining a city and state recognized Green Business Certification allows for positive marketing and outreach as well as an opportunity to grow a donor base to include those who champion environmentalism and earth conscious business practices. It’s a snowball effect. Our certification checklist and process has been vetted by the Santa Monica Office of Sustainability, the Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, the National Resources Defense Council in Washington D.C. and by the Department of Toxic Substances Control in Sacramento, CA. the governing body that administers and approves all the green business programs operating in the State of California. The emergence of AEP's program has and will continue to have a demonstrably positive effect on the health and quality of life for millions of Angelenos every day and a dramatic multiplier effect for the Arts and cultural sector. By joining together hundreds of arts organizations of every aesthetic and type, in every community prosperous and financially challenged, urban and rural, we create a powerful constituency whose direct interaction with the general public can not be overstated. AEP is committed to strict and rigid data collection and will be publishing an annual Los Angeles Arts Environmental Report (LAAER) that details the members’ collective CO2 reductions, water and waste savings and other valuable information to demonstrate the actual impact of the program. This report and the positive actions of our members will have the beneficial outcome of positioning the arts sector as a leader in the emerging environmental field, making them even more attractive for private and public support.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
ARTmageddon
ARTmageddon 7 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

One of the major and critical benefits of ARTmageddon centers on cultivating neighborhoods and their connection to artists. Los Angeles is a city defined by its freeways. And yet, there are dozens of beautiful, culturally and historically rich neighborhoods, that while tourists travel from hundreds and thousands of miles away to experience, we often aren't even aware of what is waiting only steps from our front door. Here at ARTmageddon, we believe Los Angeles and Art should be defined by its neighborhoods. A project of this magnitude benefits not only the arts in a direct and literal way but on levels that span across economic and neighborhood development. And that's why we shout our rallying cry! "Less Car! More ART!"

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Act2Connect
Act2Connect 307 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project is anticipated to have short-term, measurable impacts on levels of violence and features conducive to community safety (traffic planning, street lighting, etc.) in the neighborhoods we target. Increased rates of early disclosure and assistance for domestic violence and child abuse—among populations that are often extremely difficult for more traditional social-services approaches to reach effectively—may be another key beneficial outcome. However, while these outcomes are worthwhile on their own, we believe that the most significant neighborhood-level change (and one that could provide a template for a broader, L.A. County-wide set of practices) will be found in increased levels of social connection in neighborhoods often characterized by precisely the opposite: transient populations, physically dense but largely anonymous living and housing patterns, very low rates of voting and civic engagement, low rates of volunteerism, and pronounced disengagement between generations. By mobilizing a core group of resident volunteer leaders, setting in motion and supporting a project development approach in which they themselves develop and intensity a network of social relationships in the community, and tying this network to a series of safety outcomes explicitly related to neighbor-to-neighbor trust and support, and to engagement with public institutions and systems, we hope to establish a self-sustaining, growing movement toward connection in each of our 10 targeted neighborhoods. We know from data and evaluation (both our own, and a growing research literature) that networks of effective and supportive social relationships are the “keystone” factor among a group of characteristics variously called “protective factors,” “well-being indicators,” or “components of resiliency.” The presence of these characteristics are what sets successful communities apart from others, even in cases where more traditional indicators of community vitality (wealth and income, levels of educational attainment, etc.) are low. To put it simply, even economically “poor” neighborhoods may be experienced by their residents as desirable places to live and interact if these other factors are present in high levels. Demonstrating the effectiveness of an approach to promote these connectedness-related factors at the neighborhood level could have far-reaching impacts in L.A. County. Approaches to community safety, economic development, and civic engagement rooted in enforcement, job training, and formal education will always have their place. However, addressing and moving beyond the limits of these approaches—and thus producing real and lasting change in some of the most intractable issue areas facing our under-resourced communities—becomes possible only through reliance on strategies mobilizing resident-to-resident networks of trust and mutual support. These small-scale, resident-led institutions are the future of a safe, vibrant, healthy, and just Los Angeles County.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Advancement Project: Safe Streets for Watts Students
Advancement Project: Safe Streets for Watts Students 9 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Advancement Project’s Safe Routes to School initiative will greatly benefit the Los Angeles community by increasing public safety in one the city’s most violent and poor neighborhoods. We expect that our Safe Routes to School initiative will not only lead to increased student safety in and around schools, but also increased school attendance and decreased dropout rates over five years. Our Safe Routes to School effort will compliment Urban Peace’s leadership of the Community Safety Partnership in Watts, where we provide technical assistance to the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) and the LAPD to implement a historic and joint community safety plan. Through the Community Safety Partnership, Urban Peace has instructed 45 LAPD law enforcement officers stationed in Watts for five years to implement community policing best practices. We have also trained 15 emerging Latino residents to become leaders of this community safety effort. The Urban Peace Academy is also training a cadre of community intervention and Safe Routes to School workers in Spring and Fall 2013 as part of the City of Los Angeles Office of Gang Reduction and Youth Development’s regional strategy. After just one year after our leadership of the Community Safety Partnership, the results of our efforts have been nothing short of extraordinary, with violent crime rates in Watts at the lowest levels in recent history. Because our Community Safety Partnership will act as a foundation for our Safe Routes to School initiative, we are confident that our efforts will have a profound effect on not only improving safety in and around schools, but also in improving overall community safety and health. When residents feel safe enough to travel in their community, we expect that Watts youth and families will engage in increased physical activity by walking and biking to school, leading to increased school attendance, as well as lowered obesity and diabetes rates.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

ADVANCE will serve as a vanguard for the legal profession: inspiring, training, and producing cutting-edge, socially responsible lawyers committed to closing the justice gap in Los Angeles. We help deliver affordable legal services to millions of people, and empower law graduates to become social entrepreneurs and practice law centered in restoring justice. We focus on three groups affected by the justice system: 1) recent law school graduates; 2) low and moderate income people; and 3) local court systems. In 10 years, we hope to build a revolution in law that: 1) assists 5 million people currently going unrepresented in court; 2) creates a majority of legal jobs for new law graduates; 3) reduces the number of cases clogging the court system; and 4) increases the level of job satisfaction and work-life balance among lawyers.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Advot: Theater to Facilitate Change
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project benefits Los Angeles on individual, communal and systemic levels. Empowered individuals capable of using exemplary communication skills develop healthier relationships with family members, neighbors and become more active citizens. The greater their capacity to communicate and engage in both day-to-day conversations with peers and adults, they will be capable of entering into greater conversations about civic good, politics and service. As active members of their local communities, within schools, on the streets, at jobs, etc, they will bear the creative ability to not only be productive, but also transformative. As more young people, especially in isolated communities due to geography, ethnicity, or socio-economic classs, find the ability to navigate the complex system of institutional, civic and professional networks, the stratified nature of the Los Angele ecosystem becomes more flattened and a sustainable and healthy city. The greater the capacity for today’s young generation, especially those without the privilege that comes to many others, to find their voice, and how to use it effectively to communicate their needs, feelings and dreams, the stronger each citizen, community and our city will be.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Alliance College-Ready Public Schools - BLAST
Alliance College-Ready Public Schools - BLAST 7 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

With just the current BLAST schools, Alliance will provide a high-quality, 21st century college-preparatory education for more than 3,750 low-income students annually in Los Angeles’ most underserved communities. Additionally, Alliance plans to grow the number of new BLAST schools by 10 over the next five years, ultimately educating 9,000 low-income students in Los Angeles annually. District-wide, LAUSD high schools graduate only 65% of their students and only 22% of those graduate with the required “A-G” college preparatory classes needed to attend a four-year public university in California. In contrast, Alliance schools graduate 92% of their students in four years and send 95% of graduates to college. It is estimated that a high school graduate will earn nearly $400,000 more over his or her lifetime than a high school dropout, and a college graduate will earn nearly $1.6M more. In addition, high school dropouts are eight times more likely to be incarcerated, 50% less likely to vote, and are under-qualified for 90% of jobs. Two-thirds of dropouts will use public welfare benefits at some point in their lives. The benefit to Los Angeles is the increased earnings and increased tax revenue generated for each Alliance high school and college graduate, and the savings from public assistance and incarceration costs. Alliance BLAST graduates also increase the pool of potential employees, entrepreneurs, and business leaders in the digital economy that makes up an increasingly large piece of Los Angeles’ economic growth. As importantly, Alliance high school and college graduates provide community stability and civic involvement in their neighborhoods, city, and state. Beyond Alliance BLAST schools, our goal is to serve as a model for other schools and districts and to share our lessons and best practices, therefore helping improve academic performance, high school graduation, and college completion rates for thousands more Los Angeles public school students outside the Alliance. Alliance’s early success with BLAST has drawn a significant level of interest from many in the broader public education community. Alliance hosts regular observation visits at BLAST schools for school leaders, district officials, researchers, and policy makers, and Alliance staff are called on regularly to speak at education and policy conferences. Alliance has also held preliminary discussions with two local university schools of education to discuss potential joint residency and teaching programs to prepare new teachers for the effective use of educational technology.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
An Rx for LA - Combining Art & Technology to ReBuild Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

One of our fashion projects is working with groups and individuals who are trying to bring manufacturing jobs back to LA. They are either setting up or working with existing groups of workers so that not matter or how large - or how small a job is - and no matter what skill that job will require - any designer will be able to get affordable quality work done. This helps make up for all the lesser skilled jobs LA has lost over the years by creating higher skilled and higher paying jobs. Live Broadway theater is the number on tourist draw in New York - and it is now the only one of the major performing arts that has continued to grow both in grosses and in audience. That is why one of our goals is to help develop a major theater district between the theaters in Downtown Los Angeles and - joined by the Red Line - the theaters of Hollywood and North Hollywood. And besides the billion dollars that New York reaps every year from the theater industry - it also creates more film and TV jobs in New York. Live theater makes New York - and London - the only cities where an actor, director, or writer can have a major theatrical and film or TV career - concurrently. And it is one of the many reasons why LA is losing so much of the film and TV industry to New York. That's why we are working to assist all levels of the theatrical community from 49 and 99 seat equity waiver theaters to successfully finding tenants for existing DTLA theaters to working to create a major international theater festival to helping develop technological advances that could change the future of live entertainment forever. It's also why we have supported the Festival of New American Musicals and our new contemporary opera company - The Industry - since their inceptions. A strong live theater community is essential to the long term health of two of our largest existing industries - film & TV and tourism.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Art Revitalization Movement
Art Revitalization Movement
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Northeast San Fernando Valley Art Revitalization Movement will benefit Los Angeles by establishing artistic, cultural and sustainable art projects in a historically neglected part of Los Angeles. The North East San Fernando Valley has the second largest concentration of Latinos in Los Angeles, rivaling East Los Angeles. The community is economically, culturally and racially diverse. Furthermore, the majority of the residents are working class, first-generation Mexican-American or recent immigrants. Creating a viable and long-lasting Art Revitalization movement in the area will expand and maintain Los Angeles as an international art and cultural center. Currently, the Northeast San Fernando Valley in general, and Pacoima in particular are experiencing an “Art Renaissance”, spearheaded by local muralists and community members. In the past two years Van Nuys Blvd, between Arleta Ave and Glenoaks Blvd has been dubbed Mural Mile, in reference to the dozens of world-class murals that have been designed. The most notable murals have been designed and painted collaboratively with the local community by Kristy Sandoval and Levi Ponce. Pacoima Art Revolution, which is a reinterpretation of the Mona Lisa and Freedom Fighter which pays homage to Assata Shakur are two examples of mural projects that have inspired and propelled other art projects in the area. Freedom Fighter, designed by Kristy Sandoval and painted entirely by local women artists and aspiring artists defiantly repositions a “Womyns place in the struggle,” for equality. The mural challenges patriarchal gender roles and stands in stark contrast to the billboards and other media in the area that sexualize the female form. Los Angeles once was considered the mural capital of the world. The Northeast San Fernando Valley has organically taken over the mantle with great enthusiasm. However, all of these projects have been grassroots funded or paid out of pocket by the artists. With art programs cut in public schools, young people rely on community-based art projects to express themselves. These murals project have not only beautified the city, but also have transformed how community members see themselves. In order to create a sustainable art movement in the community and impact greater Los Angeles, more art programs, murals, and public art projects need to be supported in the area. The burgeoning art movement in the North East San Fernando Valley is slowly gaining momentum, but with the right type of support it can have a great impact on future generations of Angelenos.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Artbound - Phase II
Artbound - Phase II
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

By providing regular, bi-monthly hour-long broadcast episodes of Artbound featuring the work of Los Angeles County artists we will reach a broader audience. We are particularly interested in reaching more traditional arts audiences with the high quality work of hard to find artists and small arts groups. At first glance, Los Angeles’ cultural offerings are limited to a small number of high profile arts institutions: museums, performing arts centers, and concert halls. Most Angeleno’s are unaware that there are hundreds of smaller arts organizations and thousands of artists who regularly produce excellent work. Because of the lack of visibility these small groups and individual artists struggle to build audiences. Artbound will highlight these artists and arts groups through the media of television, we are exposing thousands of traditional arts consumers to current, more relevant artistic impulses. This project will increase the profile of under-served artists and, at the same time, help develop more diverse cultural appetites among traditional arts audiences. By convening the community we will open doors for communication and exchange between and among artists and audiences. These regular gatherings, centered around the viewing of a hour long episode of Artbound, will be fertile ground for the creation of a more vital and connected arts community

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Arts & Culture Infrastructure Initiative
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>What is particularly exciting about this project is that it will not only impact the Arts & Cultural Vitality indicator, but also the Social Connectedness and Income and Employment indicators. The core of the Initiative is to build an engaged and active web of relationships between Angelinos and arts and culture non-profits through arts participation, board volunteerism (Social Connectedness) and philanthropy. In turn, these engaged citizens will bring more resources– financial and knowledge based– to non-profit cultural organizations and thus improve the success of those organizations. Ultimately, better-supported arts organizations will help increase compensation and standards of living for artists and arts administrators, which is a significant challenge in the LA cultural landscape.</p> <p>LA STAGE Alliance’s major strengths are building relationships and aggregating resources. This project is a great example of the work we do. We have two sectors (for-profit corporate businesses and non-profit cultural institutions) that could greatly benefit from working together on many levels. The for-profit employees will have the opportunity to gain skills, network with each other, and become personally invested in the cultural organizations and artists in their communities in a way that is tailored to their individual interests and needs. The artists and cultural organizations will make huge strides in organizational stability, sharper mission focus and strategic planning by engaging with a new set of talented and trained board members and will thrive with an infusion of new services and funding streams. This Initiative will build a growing set of passionate professionals on both the for- and non-profit sides, who are excited about LA’s cultural landscape. They will be given the necessary tools to take our current cultural assets and turn them into a powerhouse that will propel Los Angeles into truly being the Cultural Capital of the United States.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Arts ReSTORE LA: Westwood. An urban renewal project by the Hammer Museum
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

In the past 25 years Los Angeles has become a thriving cultural economy with 1 in 8 jobs within the creative sector, and the city has earned a reputation as a premier arts destination. Yet while there is now so much creative energy and talent across Los Angeles, there isn’t a cohesive approach to connect artists to audiences in a way that integrates and revitalizes the existing infrastructure of communities and neighborhoods. And there is no direct artist to consumer opportunity except for occasional festivals and fairs. Temporary or narrowly defined opportunities exist, such as farmers markets, arts festivals and business-sponsored artist commissions, but these lack the type of lasting impact on place that we seek to address. And although Los Angeles has no shortage of shopping opportunities or dedicated areas with a high concentration of retail businesses, it is more difficult to find a place where residents and tourists can access unique, locally or hand-made products on an ongoing basis. This proposed movement of instigating artisanal marketplaces in underutilized communities has the potential for a lasting impact on these neighborhoods, with pop-up markets developing into long-term storefronts featuring L.A. artists and their products.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Arts on the Grounds: L.A. Escena Performance Series
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Arts on the Grounds unique programming will actively engage the diverse community in the West Adams district, UCLA students, scholars, and K-12 school groups with intersections between literature and the performing arts. The program aims to increase the opportunities for engagements with art for local residents in low-income neighborhoods, address a growing demand for performing arts in the West Adams district, and foster partnerships between humanities scholars and performing arts practitioners. The partners and productions in the series that we will pilot in Summer 2013 have been selected based on their appeal to Spanish-speaking audiences in local communities and are designed to engage youth from low-income families in cultural enrichment. We expect to reach a total audience of 800-1000 during the Summer 2013 Arts on the Grounds series. Each theater event will be promoted by both our theatrical partners and the Clark Library, and we will work with the West Adams Heritage Association to advertise the events in their newsletter and other appropriate neighborhood outlets.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Asphalt to Apples: Sprouting Healthy Kids and Gardens
Asphalt to Apples: Sprouting Healthy Kids and Gardens 13 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

It’s a well examined and researched fact that the overall health of children in Los Angeles is poor, with children as young as age 3 suffering from pre-diabetic symptoms. While childhood obesity rates have leveled off in Los Angeles, they continue to be high, with Latino and African American children experiencing disproportionate effects of obesity and related health impacts, due to many factors such as income, housing and food insecurity as well as low access to healthy food with high exposure to calorie and chemical laden junk food. Children in L.A. and around the country are currently so unhealthy that their life expectancy is projected to be lower than that of their parents. Research on school gardens has shown that children eat more fresh fruits and vegetables, perform better on tests, and are more likely to have higher attendance rates when they experience gardening at school. In addition, gardens have been shown to increase children’s sense of ownership and pride of their accomplishments, an essential step toward taking control of their own health. As part of the regular school day, gardens provide a rich experience that improves both the capacity for learning and the ability to make healthy, informed decisions about their diets - and lives. Even children as young as age 2 can garden and benefit from such experiential activities. Farm to Preschool has found that children as young as 4 are asking their parents to buy and grow the foods they’ve eaten and grown themselves at school, something repeated in the feedback Garden School Foundation staff receive about the 6-11 year olds in their program. By inspiring, creating and sustaining a culture of gardens at schools, children, their families and their teachers will all benefit. Benefits are numerous and include (1) greater access to healthy foods; (2) increased consumption of healthy foods; (3) increased learning in all subjects and core standards; (4) skill building through the act of sowing, growing, harvesting and cooking food, as well as mentoring of older children to the young; (5) improved connection to and understanding of the environment that we live in; (6) more visually appealing schools that enhance learning and behavior; (7) a culture of connectedness to our land and each other by bringing schools and the community together; and certainly (8) the culminating effect of improved health outcomes for children as well as their families for generations.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

ThrdPlace benefits Los Angeles by telling the story of its identity and connecting the diverse stakeholders that live within and contribute to it. Los Angeles is a metropolis that represents many, different communities. Angelenos live in Hollywood because they identify with the people that live, work and play in Hollywood. The same can be said about Venice Beach. Angelenos invest in the metropolis with their vote, taxes and consumption. Our Governing bodies allocate of those limited funds by prioritizing the needs of the metropolis with the needs of the individual communities. But, Angelenos also invest socially. They invest in the long-term growth of communities as they build homes, patron local businesses, be-friend neighbors and leisure in public parks. We need and want to be part of developing our communities. thrdPlace is the platform that enables each and every Angeleno to tell his or her own story, mobilize the resources around them, and be part of developing their community. The story of D’Artagnan Scorza of Inglewood is not unlike many Angelenos. Over the years, D’Artagnan has witnessed a lack of development in his community. The City and businesses were not investing and long-term residents were moving away. As he looked around Inglewood, he could see dozens of outdoor, black-top basketball courts remain empty throughout the day and at night serve as a hub for criminal activity. The courts that were built as a recreational space and a community asset now served as a liability. Instead of giving over the identity of Inglewood to criminals, D’Artagnan decided not to move away but to invest in his community. To do this, D’Artagnan and his Non Profit, Social Justice Learning Institute, began to build urban gardens. D’Artagnan rallied his community to build an urban garden on top of one of the courts. As a result, the community now has a garden built by its community members, outfitted by For Profits and maintained by his Non Profit. The garden provides local residents free access to fresh, organic food. Because of D’Artagnan’s investment in his community, he changed the identity of his local park. Social Justice Learning Institute is now using thrdPlace for their 100 Seeds of Change Campaign. The goal of this initiative is to transform Inglewood into a healthy living community by empowering residents to grow their own food in a collaborative, local network. The comprehensive, citywide plan enlists community members – particularly, local youths – to create 100 urban gardens located at Inglewood homes, schools and parks. D’Artagnan is an example of one Angeleno. His actions can and are being replicated across our city. With thrdPlace, all those micro-movements can connect and together develop our city to be a true reflection of its citizens.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
AxS [ak-sis] Festival
AxS [ak-sis] Festival
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

In 1984, the world came to Los Angeles. Mostly they came for the Summer Olympics, but many also experienced stunning performances by artists of international caliber during the Olympic Arts Festival; Robert Graham’s monumental Olympic Gateway sculptures still tower over Memorial Coliseum as a reminder of what a great festival can mean to a great city. In 1984, Los Angeles dismissed those Orwellian connotations and instead took its place among the great international art cities – a city of the future. This celebration of arts and culture was followed at three-year intervals thereafter through 1993 as the Los Angeles Festival, which continued the tradition of artistic innovation and excellence, introducing a little-known Canadian company called Cirque du Soleil alongside master artists like Peter Brook and local standouts like Lula Washington. Now, 20 years after the last Los Angeles Festival, the AxS [ak-sis] Festival brings to the Los Angeles area not just a dynamic public event but a bold challenge to cultural, business and civic leaders to engage with the art-science movement and allow Los Angeles to lay its claim as the movement’s energy center. Increasingly complex challenges of the 21st century will be best addressed by cross-sector dialogue and innovation. The art-science movement, with its multidisciplinary emphasis, will have a ripple effect through the region as it demonstrates what is possible when intellectual capital is harnessed. Several indicators of the quality of life in Los Angeles could be impacted by art and science coming together both as a festival and as a civic initiative. The quality of education in the Los Angeles area is dismal and getting worse every year. With its emphasis on STEM to STEAM, the educational components of the art-science movement will propose much-needed strategies to better leverage creative and innovative capital and invest it in the schools. Since STEM to STEAM is increasingly a part of the national dialogue on education, AxS will help attract federal funding to launch these programs in local schools. Creative endeavor has long been recognized to enhance learning and improve graduation rates, resulting in a better prepared workforce. The cultural vitality of the region is projected to decline over the next decades, the only indicator with this discouraging trend and caused by the lack of a coherent arts-nurturing policy. The AxS Festival would establish Los Angeles as the center of a vibrant new movement, one with the potential to catalyze resources and realize powerful outcomes. Taking a page from the High Line project in New York, creative teams would be tasked with creating alternative park spaces in under-resourced neighborhoods and communicating messages about healthy living. Putting cross-disciplinary programs like Art Center College of Design’s Designmatters at the forefront, sustainable solutions to environmental challenges will be developed which address scalable outcomes.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
BE GREAT Mentoring Program
BE GREAT Mentoring Program
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The high school dropout rate in Los Angeles County is more than 20%. This rate is even higher for Hispanic and black students and students from low-income households. The community at Mar Vista Gardens, which is 84% Hispanic and has 55% of households living at the federal poverty level, is highly representative of this achievement gap. Through this project, we would be able to establish the BE GREAT program at Mar Vista Gardens as a model for other low-income and public housing communities. In fact, the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) plans to use our after-school program, which is built around BE GREAT, as the model for youth programs at all of its housing sites. As a result, the program has the potential to impact nearly 7,000 young HACLA residents, and this number is continuing to grow as HACLA develops more low-income housing sites. Specifically, the BE GREAT model has proven to have the following results for youth participants who complete the program (based on data collected by the Boys & Girls Clubs of America over two years): • 54% maintained or improved their school attendance • 77% showed a constant or improved grade in reading • 74% showed a constant or improved grade in math • 56% maintained or improved their behavior at school • 98% progressed to the next grade level on time By implementing BE GREAT at Mar Vista Gardens, our ultimate goal is to break the cycle of poverty for families living in the community. BE GREAT uses strength-based strategies and problem solving techniques to help young people develop the academic, emotional and social skills necessary to succeed in school. Improved academic achievement will encourage students to stay in school and graduate on time, thus increasing opportunities for advancement through college and employment.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Backyard Homes: Sustainable, Flexible, Affordable Housing for LA
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Backyard Homes will benefit Los Angeles by making it more livable in three substantial ways. First it will improve our housing, by making it more affordable, more flexible, more sustainable, and more livable. According to a preliminary study by Stanford University engineers, compared to a typical house of the same size, the Backyard Home has a ten times to as much as a hundred times lower environmental impact. The simple construction system will make it possible to acquire a Backyard Home the way you might buy a car, will leave no foundation if and when it is disassembled, and will be adjusted or customized to each yard and household need. A family that needs more space can find it in their own backyard. A family that wants to reduce its mortgage payment can do so. A Backyard Home can provide a home office now, and become a caregiver apartment later. Second, it will improve neighborhoods. Now, when a family’s circumstances change, they often need to move to a new community where housing is cheaper, bigger, smaller, or in some way more suitable to their new needs. This creates neighborhoods in constant flux. Neighborhoods will have greater stability when people can stay in place through the various stages of their lives. Neighborhood stability has profound benefits for the residents, from improved quality of life, to improved educational outcomes, to improved health outcomes. In addition, Backyard Homes is a solution that can replace unwanted infill housing development such as large apartment buildings or condominiums that change neighborhoods in unwanted ways. Third, Backyard Homes will improve the city as a whole, by helping reduce sprawl, traffic, and greenhouse gas emissions. The innovative construction and design technology can set a new standard for housing in the city, demonstrating that Los Angeles can grow inward instead of outward, while at the same time growing more sustainably, more beautifully, and more affordably. In the same way that mid-century modernists championed a new form of home through technology and design in 50s-era LA, Backyard Homes can make Los Angeles more Angeleno for the twenty-first century.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Ballot Brief - Ground Game
Ballot Brief - Ground Game
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

One of the downward indicators identified by the LA2050 report in the Social Connectedness arena is low voter turnout. Ground Game will address this challenge by honing in on the Los Angeles precincts with the lowest voter turnout and working to build civic engagement in these micro-neighborhoods. Initially we will focus on 6 to 10 of the worst precincts and launch a grass roots marketing campaign as described above, encourage people to express their frustrations, use the Ground Game website to link individuals to their elected officials, provide additional background information on the issue, and connect individuals to volunteer opportunities. By first focusing on a select number of the most disengaged precincts, we will refine our project methodology and build an engagement toolkit that can be replicated in other areas of the City. We are currently shifting through publically available, but difficult to decipher, information on each voting precinct in Los Angeles to determine the precincts most in need. The LA2050 Report also found low rates of volunteerism in the Social Connectedness category. Ground Game will directly address this issue by linking citizens with nonprofit and other community groups who are committed to solving specific issues in the community.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Beautiful Rain Barrels in Public Places
Beautiful Rain Barrels in Public Places
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

It benefits LA in lots of ways! First, it’s a creative way to promote the concept and use of rain barrels, which would be very beneficial if used by every in the dry, urban area of LA. Second, 30 rain barrels get out there which adds up to more than 1500 gallons of water conservation (and protection) every time it rains. Third, because of the way we designed the auctions, if we can raise sufficient funds then this project becomes sustainable and can go on until the end of time (or at least a good couple years:)

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The pioneering work of Belong with its development of a neighborhood social movement will have significant benefit to Los Angeles. Belong will bring about a holistic community transformation by galvanizing and supporting neighborhood residents to create their own community response to improving their neighborhoods/communities and contributing to safe and supportive environments for their and the neighborhood’s children. In a county as large as Los Angeles, it is virtually impossible for programs to keep up with service demand for individuals and families. Many of our neighborhoods and the people who live there are at great risk of the major social ills that concern us all: poverty, education failure, poor health, mental illness, violence, and domestic violence. There will continue to be limited government and philanthropic resources to address these large scale problems for the foreseeable future. And, the strategies that we do have as a society are relatively ineffective and too costly because they start too late when much of the damage has left scars in people’s lives. The harnessing of volunteer community ambassadors who will become champions for belonging and connecting people to social groups and critical resources is the breakthrough we need. Belongingness is a deep level of social connections. And, based on research, belonging leads to community wellness. The development and implementation of such a strategy within a 500 block urban community of Los Angeles will serve as a laboratory for the development of a scalable and replicable model framework. This model framework that will be developed with this grant funding will be usable by the diverse communities of Los Angeles and beyond who wish to replicate using their own unique assets.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Bike L.A. 2050 - Bike Safety Through Visibility
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Increasing the visibility of bicyclists will improve the safety of biking in L.A. and will in turn lead to more people feeling comfortable choosing to commute via bicycle.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Boot Camp 2050 for Change
Boot Camp 2050 for Change
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

L.A. needs a social force to bring the next generation of idealists into conversation and action. This proposal will bring together Impact Professionals and grassroots leaders representing a cross section of race, class, gender, sexuality and geography to overcome socially constructed boundaries which we recognize are imaginary and changeable. By bringing together, L.A.’s next generation of idealists, Liberty Hill will catalyze a new and impactful force for change in many neighborhoods and on multiple issues. Since these efforts and campaigns will be driven by this generation, we can channel our region’s available potential –its people who are yearning to connect– to reshape L.A. into a vigorous, thriving and pleasing place to live by 2050. Our 40-year track record tells us that by building on longtime relationships of trust and supporting those relationships with high-impact training, the benefits to L.A.’s political and social life are potentially enormous.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Boys & Girls Club of Venice Learning Center Renovation
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

According to UCLA Institute for Democracy, Education and Access, at Venice High for every 100 students in the class of 2008 who started 9th grade, only 39 graduated, and only 20 of those took the “A-G” courses needed for entrance to California’s colleges and universities. Among African American and Latino students there the numbers are even more dismal: only 31 graduated and only 12 finished A-G. Of our Club members at Venice High, 58% are Latino and 17% are African American, so most of our members are considered unlikely to graduate high school, much less go on to higher education. Our newly renovated Learning Center will provide youth with the support and skills needed to succeed in school, work, and life in the 21st century by increasing access to computer technology, offering case-managed academic assistance, informing and encouraging youth and their families to make an educational plan, and matching each youth with an adult mentor. The outcome we expect from enhancing our Learning Center will be: •75% of participants will move up at least one letter grade in math and english/reading. •60% of participants will move up at least one level on the California Standards Test scores in English/reading and math. Our evaluation consists of several strategies: •Mentoring -- We provide an adult mentor for every participant. Our Club already has over forty adult mentors working with our youth. In addition to Club staff, our group of mentors includes AP students from Venice High, college students, and adult community volunteers. We are always looking for more adult mentors. •Goals for Graduation – Monthly presentations will be held for all program participants introducing academic goal setting. Through incremental goal-setting, members create an action plan with daily and weekly goals leading to both short- and long-term gains. Included in the approach is a comprehensive guidance strategy that helps members connect their smallest results to their highest dreams. •Case Management will be used with all participants. Club staff will share information informally about individuals needing extra help on a weekly basis. They will also meet and discuss the progress and problems of all program participants formally on a monthly basis. When reports from volunteer mentors, teachers or administrators show a youth having poor scores or frequent absences, we can intervene immediately, before waiting for the next report card grading period.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Building A Community of Leaders, One Middle School Student at a Time
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Over time, Minds on Fire will build a corps of young leaders with the skills, confidence and commitment to effectively address challenges in their communities. They will enter high school prepared to graduate on time, with aspirations for college, career and civic life. And while the mission of Minds on Fire is to decrease the dropout rate for Los Angeles’s most at-risk middle school students, this project will have additional benefits spanning student achievement, youth development, teacher quality and community-wide engagement. Minds on Fire will start by working with 300 students across six schools. If that rate continues through 2050 (a conservative estimate), over 11,000 students will have participated. Because Minds on Fire looks at the Early Warning Indicators to identify students most at risk of dropping out, we will help students who would otherwise have dropped out succeed in school. They will develop the skills necessary for a successful post-secondary experience and in the workforce, namely: time management, collaboration, creative thinking, research and the academic skills that form the basis for these projects. 28,000 students drop out of school in LA County each year. 12,500 dropped out of LAUSD schools in 2011(1). If only 1,000 more students made it to graduation, there would still be a significant impact on the economy: They would likely (2): • Earn as much as $15 million in additional earnings in an average year; • Spend an additional $900,000 each year purchasing vehicles • Spend up to $45 million more on homes than they would likely spend without a diploma; and • Support as many as 130 new jobs in the region • Increase the gross regional product by up to $21 million, and pour as much as an additional $1.8 million annually into state and local coffers, all through their increased spending and investments. Improving graduation rates has a positive impact on community life. That, combined with the specifically community-problem-solving focus of this initiative would lead to an improvement in Los Angeles residents’ life expectancy, health status, and voting rates while also reducing the crime rate and the associated costs to incarcerate criminals (3). Young people across the country have already demonstrated their power to make change. Imagine if LA had thousands more young people exploring their own ideas for change – the potential is impossible to calculate, and a very real possibility. (1) CA Dept. of Education DataQuest; 2009-2010 Dropouts by Cohort (2) http://www.all4ed.org/files/LosAngelesCA_leb.pdf http://www.all4ed.org/publication_material/EconStatesPostsecondary (3) Source: http://www.measureofamerica.org/docs/APortraitOfCA.pdf

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Building Blocks LA: changing the shape of Los Angeles through imaginative urban planning
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Activating people’s everyday experiences and imaginations to promote zoning reform is a chance to promote land uses that reflect the reality and aspirations of contemporary Los Angeles. LA is a place with a diverse population, an expanding transit system, a need for more affordable housing, and young people who value urban energy and living. Los Angeles has been held back by suburban-oriented land use rules that promoted driving and separated people and places. Better zoning and land use can weave neighborhoods together and help us become a city with more connected, equitable and healthy communities; more diverse and affordable forms of housing; more sustainable infrastructure; and more vibrant and creative places and economic activity.</p> <p>Some zoning rules have had the effect of preventing lower income individuals and members of minority ethnic groups from living in places with more amenities, more economic opportunities and better schools. By excluding some social groups from the mainstream, land use rules contributed to clustering of poverty, unemployment and other challenges that have harmed communities for generations. </p> <p>They also keep the city divided by race and class. The Los Angeles Metropolitan region is as economically unequal as the Dominican Republic and residential segregation by income has increased in Los Angeles over the past 30 years. </p> <p>Zoning rules make it difficult for informal dwellings and informal economic activities such as street vending to be legally integrated into the mainstream of society. Zoning for cars through minimum parking along with zoning that separates residences from jobs and businesses has made it more difficult for people to walk as part of their daily lives, reducing social interactions and use of public space.</p> <p>Improved zoning rules inspired by residents’ visions and models of a transformed city and research into best practices can help Los Angeles reach its potential. Better land use rules can:</p> <p>• Make streets and other public spaces into better places for socializing, strolling and civic engagement. </p> <p>• Reduce driving, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions</p> <p>• Legalize more diverse (and more affordable) types of housing in more places </p> <p>• Learn from and legalize culturally diverse uses of the city <p>• Develop local food sources</p> <p>• Allow more experimentation with different ways of living and connecting in LA </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Building Bridges in the San Gabriel Valley: Social Connectedness in Action
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project boosts social connectedness in the San Gabriel Valley, an area of Los Angeles County trailing in linkages. Away from many economic and government power centers, the region has been semi-isolated among its own cities and regionally. Like in a body, an atrophied region is a problem for an area; this project looks to add muscle and flexibility to an underdeveloped part of the Greater Los Angeles body. The project rapidly boosts communications capabilities for the existing Social Services program. The upgrades will greatly aid in communicating to diverse audiences and increases effectiveness through technology. Adding PowerPoint capabilities and laptops for mobility will boost the effectiveness of project contacts. It aims to help smooth the regional transition as more Asian-Pacific Islanders arrive along with newly arrived Latinos amid existing native and immigrant Latino populations. A faith-based organization that has begun building cross-cultural bridges can be very successful in building the connections and trust needed for dialogue and growth. With the rapidly growing Asian-Pacific population throughout Los Angeles, this component can be a model for other areas as demographics change. The project’s expansion of the LA Voice operation in the San Gabriel Valley creates many new opportunities for connectedness and growth. Rather than being the current outlier in the LA Voice/PICO network, the San Gabriel Valley organization will function as a hub, linked together, regionally, and statewide and nationally through the PICO networks. The strengthening of local links also benefits Greater Los Angeles by yielding a more involved and aware region. The events in the project will promote connectedness among residents, businesses, and local governments. The area has a history of disconnectedness and at times, distrust, among the different sectors. These events are designed to provide new opportunities for residents and also rebuild communication links between government, the private sector, and citizens through contact. The Los Angeles area gains when different parts of the community are in closer contact and cooperation. Training will allow for ongoing returns in the future. Staff development will allow for more creativity and awareness in addressing needs. Training also creates opportunities for residents, in particular youth, to learn and ideally develop into solid community leaders. The formation of national connections will also benefit the region and Los Angeles with new ideas and opportunities for additional resources. Social connectedness is a complex process. This project sees the challenges and uses a variety of activities to create opportunities for growth in a region that has lacked cohesiveness for years. The benefits for the region will also benefit Greater Los Angeles as the area becomes more integrated and serves as a model for other underserved areas. Improving the region betters all of Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Building Future Leaders through STEM Education
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our proposed program aims to keep Los Angeles competitive within technology-based sectors and industries by fostering a skilled, educated group of low-income youth currently living in public housing communities. Building Future Leaders Through STEM Education will: 1) Expose Los Angeles youth in public housing, grades four through twelve, to local industries that rely on engineers and other scientists as a chief source of innovation. 2) Provide 45 youth participants with in-class training led by leading professionals at local firms and schools. 3) Provide paid internships for youth within collaborating companies and government agencies. 4) Produce quantifiable results within a model program that may be duplicated within other low-income communities within Los Angeles. KPI's program is a pioneering collaboration with local STEM-based corporations, federal agencies and universities with the long-term goal of fostering academic and career development by harnessing the abilities of under-served residents in public housing. This program has the dual effect of improving and expanding the Los Angeles economy and breaking the cycle of poverty and costly government entitlements for today's youth and young adults and their families.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Building Strong Small Businesses through Microlending
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Opportunity Fund is pioneering a new approach to small business support that combines a mission-driven strategy and commitment to impact measurement with the market knowledge, efficiency, and reach needed to make a sustained difference in the lives and livelihoods of Los Angeles’ small business owners. By deploying capital to low-income, underserved small business owners, our microlending program helps drive small business growth and job creation in the communities that need it most.</p> <p>Opportunity Fund’s borrowers have an 85% business survival rate; each loan we originate creates or sustains 2.5 jobs on average. The financing and support we provide our small businesses helps them increase business revenues by an average of 20%.</p> <p>The mainstream financial industry offers little to help small businesses access the capital they need to grow and thrive, especially in places like East LA, Boyle Heights, and Downtown. As a nonprofit, mission driven, financial institution, Opportunity Fund targets entrepreneurs who operate their businesses (and, in many cases, live their lives) outside the financial mainstream. In LA, our borrowers are 98% minority, with an average median household income of less than $24,000.</p> <p>Opportunity Fund made our first microloan in LA in 2010. Through LA2050, we seek to scale our microlending program in the region’s underserved communities to support more than 350 small business owners each year in LA County (and 650 in the Greater Los Angeles region). This loan volume represents a big step toward our vision of a truly inclusive financial system in which every small business owner has access to affordable capital to build a vibrant enterprise, increase household income, create jobs, and support a family and a future. It means that in the coming year, Opportunity Fund will:</p> - Invest $2.3 million in small businesses in undercapitalized neighborhoods in LA - Create or retain more than 850 jobs, primarily in minority-owned and women-owned businesses - Generate $4 million in new annual economic activity in LA through new spending, wages, and tax revenues.</p> <p>Natasha is the Co-founder and CEO of CoolHaus ice cream, a gourmet ice cream business that started out as one food truck in Los Angeles and now features 10 trucks and 55 employees in 4 cities, as well as a storefront in Culver City and distribution through Whole Foods Markets. When Natasha wanted to purchase a second truck and start expanding her business, she could not qualify for conventional financing. CoolHaus was less than two years old, and was not yet profitable. In addition, Natasha was still paying off student loans, and her credit score reflected this debt. Instead, Natasha came to OF for a $25,000 loan to help the business expand. As Natasha describes, “The loan from Opportunity Fund was the catalyst at a key moment in our growth!” CoolHaus has since received two more OF loans to support national expansion.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Building a Lifetime of Options and Opportunities for Men (BLOOM)
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Support for BLOOM benefits Los Angeles in three ways: 1. There is a growing movement in philanthropy to invest in a more focused way to address the challenges facing young Black men and boys. Along with The California Endowment’s Boys and Men of Color focus and The California Wellness Foundation’s Violence Prevention Initiative, BLOOM is an instrumental part of L.A.’s philanthropic efforts to address the disparities in outcomes for Black male youth. 2. Given Los Angeles often sets the pace for identifying solutions to challenges that impact our nation in general, lessons learned from Los Angeles can serve as a testing ground to address two of our nation’s most pressing needs: (1) cost effective alternatives in the face of fiscal constraints; and (2) the urgency to positively alter the trajectory of system-involved Black youth. 3. Lastly, there are more than 800,000 Blacks residing in Los Angeles County. We can ill afford to have a significant segment of this population (i.e., Black male youth) continue to underachieve and missing the opportunity to become self-sufficient, taxpaying citizens of our community. L.A.’s national and global competiveness is inextricably linked to these outcomes as we approach the year 2050.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Building on LA's Social Capital
Building on LA's Social Capital 99 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>The driving force for creating the Lending Circles for Citizenship model is to simultaneously provide immigrants with tools for financial integration while enhancing the capacity of immigrant services organizations to support this process. Based on the success of the pilot, MAF is confident that the model has the potential for expansion among additional community-based partners in Los Angeles. Upon the passage of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), social lending can serve as a model for helping undocumented immigrants collectively pool their money to pay for any penalty needed to adjust their status.</p> <p>With respect to its impact in Los Angeles, the Lending Circles for Citizenship model will increase civic participation among the region’s legal permanent resident population. Going beyond theoretical classroom knowledge, immigrants will have the opportunity to achieve real-life, tangible, and measurable outcomes, such as opening bank accounts at mainstream financial institutions, saving and applying for citizenship, and increasing credit scores. Moreover, the program will increase the capacity of Los Angeles nonprofit organizations to provide a responsible, trustworthy, and socially conscious financial product that improves financial outcomes for their clients.</p> <p>Similar to Lending Circles for Citizenship, the benefits of the Security Deposit Loan program also have a tremendous impact on the ability of participants to achieve their goals. Through receiving an affordable loan repayable over two years, renting an apartment becomes accessible to participants. In addition to decreasing housing instability and homelessness, the program’s financial and social benefits on the Los Angeles population include:</p> <p>1. Renting a first apartment will become accessible to people who currently lack savings. 2. The loan will be paid back over two years, making monthly payments affordable. 3. The process will provide a safe lending experience that models and encourages responsible financial behavior and success. 4. The loan will improve credit scores and develop a pot of savings for future rent deposits.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
CARECEN's College Head Start
CARECEN's College Head Start 21 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

CARECEN’s youth and parent programs benefit the city of Los Angeles by creating a space where families can grow together as a union in pursuing a higher education and creating leaders that are active in addressing issues that affect their community. CARECEN’s education programs strive to create a space where both parents and youth can work together to address student needs that exist at local schools and the community. Students participating in College Head Start will be able to receive the academic, emotional, and financial education support that students are currently lacking in the schools. Given recent changes and cuts students often find themselves confused and unprepared to meet new standards and have nowhere to go for assistance. CARECEN has been in the Pico Union/Westlake community for 30 years and is a trusted organization where immigrant families go for help. College Head Start and the parent programs address these needs and fill the void left by the devastating cuts schools have suffered in recent years. CARECEN's youth programs give students and their families the tools they need to work and advocate for quality education, the support to strive for college and the leadership training makes them aware of issues affecting their community and how they can work to change it. We believe that families will change and improve Los Angeles. We want to ensure that our youth are better prepared for success and that they have the support of their parents to improve their lives and therefore, their community. CARECEN programs create a safe space for dialogue that helps bridge the gap created by migration, cultural, language and generational differences. It is important not to only have an informed student or to only have an informed parent but both working as a team in building a better future for everyone.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Camp Educates Kids Forever
Camp Educates Kids Forever 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This scholarship program will allow more than 1,000 youth to attend summer camp in 2013, who otherwise would not have this opportunity. The impact will be realized throughout the City of Los Angeles, with the majority of scholarships being allocated among summer camps located at RAP recreation centers located within economically disadvantaged communities, and for youth to experience a week long overnight camp at one of our two residential camps. The 2005 and 2006 the American Community Survey revealed that 20% of the City met the Federal guidelines for poverty, with a 29% child poverty rate. Approximately 80% of Los Angeles Unified School District students qualify for free or reduced price meals. With over one third of the population of the City under the age of 18 (Census 2010), affordable out of school time programs that offer informal learning opportunities to keep youth engaged in summer vacation months with the goal of minimizing the summer learning gap. The RAP summer day camp and residential camp programs provide a multitude of benefits by bridging social diversity within communities, providing an alternative to anti-social behavior, teaching community values and life skills, facilitating computer literacy, promoting environmental stewardship, advancing socialization skills and team building to teach conflict resolution and problem solving skills, while improving the health of youth by providing alternative physical activities and nutrition.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Camp Hollywood HEART
Camp Hollywood HEART
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will specifically benefit Los Angeles because it will contribute to number of artists in the city that contribute to the economy as well as the culture. Los Angeles is one of the most artistically rich cities in the world in part thanks to the Hollywood industry. With schools continually eliminating arts programs, where will Los Angeles create, develop, and maintain identity? Hollywood HEART believes by providing these opportunities for youth in Los Angeles, they will use their skills to enhance the quality of life for all Angelenos.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Camp reLAte: A Community Organizing Approach to Cultivating Connectedness
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>For a sustainable Los Angeles in 2050, we know that we need greener buildings, a local food system, better education and a thriving economy. But we also know that these efforts require us to adapt our values and behaviors so that we can work together to maintain all those improved conditions and structures. Mostly change efforts succeed because people come together to create and maintain a shared vision because many different needs and interests shape their context. Even with initial success, sustaining long-term change is often difficult. Change is sustained by structure and culture. We need a culture of connectedness to serve as the glue that holds all the pieces of our common vision together. </p> <p>Creating culture happens through relationships—people engaging people in patterns of conversation, rituals and habits organized around shared values and stories. To ensure social connectedness for LA in 2050, Camp reLAte will inspire Angelenos to cultivate new patterns that prioritize relationships across our many different factors of diversity—economic status, neighborhood, faith, ethnicity, race, gender identity, sexual orientation, etc. We will organize one another into a healthy culture of connectedness through community-catalyzing leadership practices.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Casa Amador
Casa Amador 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The mission of Reach for the Top, Inc., is to address the plight of homeless and provide the support necessary for them to attain the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency to become to become permanently housed. Reach for the Top, Inc., provides transitional housing where clients can stabilize in a safe, nurturing, environment while receiving the assistance necessary to access the services that lead to permanent housing. Our goal is to send healthy, self-confident, competent persons back into society. This program will help reduce the tax money used to care for the chronically homeless. Our residents will no loner be in jails, Emergency Rooms, or shelter. They will be in their new home, stable, safe and supported. We will assist them in finding permanent housing. The proposed location of Casa Amador, 4801 West Adams was involved in the civil unrest of 1992. Almost 84% of commercial structures and 83% of residential structures were in need of repair, according to a California Redevelopment Association survey done in 1995. By developing this lot, it will aesthetically change the characteristics of this blighted area, encourage outside investment and provide much needed services to a neglected community. Providing stable transitional housing for the chronically homeless population that will also offer resources so residents can learn new skills, find employment, and finally find permanent housing will benefit the area greatly. These individuals will be supported so that they can succeed. Their success will bring hope to the neighborhood and elevate the entire area. This project specifically deals with women and children. For the children living at our facility they will have a better start to their day; providing them with the foundation to succeed in school and life. this will set them on the track to grow into conscientious citizens. Lastly our community center will be open to all individuals looking to participate or learn something new. This center will provide a place for people who might be on the edge of poverty. We would provide help to those who need it, keeping the potential homeless in their homes.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Central Educational Network Based On The Apprenticeship Model
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The LA Makerspace is committed to fostering innovation and embracing community. We chose Downtown LA / South LA as our neighborhood as it is conveniently within reach of public transportation, providing ready access to a variety of neighborhoods independent of their socioeconomic status. LA Makerspace provides shared physical resources otherwise unaffordable or attainable by an individual or family. It provides a fluid workspace in order to facilitate the collaboration, inspiration and encouragement of others. The maker movement, as it pertains to education, seeks to build the confidence, analytic skills, and creativity of those involved by establishing an environment centered on the creative act. This collaborative and project-based approach to learning runs counter to the current trend in education of defining academic success in terms of standardized tests, especially at the cost of hands-on programs such as shop, art, and laboratory science. It is a place to learn about engineering, design, and research through both organized classes as well as open-ended projects. As an educational endeavor LA Makerspace provides a community meeting point for projects ranging from robotics to filmmaking, as well as a shared lab space for community members to develop their own projects and work with partnered research institutions within our citizen science program. This community of practice also includes the running of teacher workshops whereby current educators meet, with students and professionals, to design and test various projects to run in and outside the traditional classroom. LA Makerspace bridges the gap between academia and the community-at-large by establishing a peer-to-peer mentorship network and giving members the chance to apprentice into a whole variety of fields ranging from industrial design to data analysis. The ultimate goal for LA Makerspace is to foster productive community members.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Change-Making Gardens
Change-Making Gardens
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Right now to get a plot at a community garden, in most places in LA County you have to wait 3 to 6 YEARS. Meanwhile, there are many groups that are “thinking about” creating a community garden. ECM’s networking partners know specific landholders who are “thinking about” opening their land to growing food. Yet all these groups are scared of the unknown because they have never done it before. We have. We’ve created gardens in several vastly different models of what “community gardening” can mean (traditional plot style, school garden, and charity style). We can share what works and what doesn’t work, and help groups who are “thinking about it” get past the mulling-it-over stage into meaningful action – into creating real, physical, much-needed garden spaces. Ultimately, our project will facilitate much more land being available for community gardens in Los Angeles. Additionally, ECM has the connections – locally, nationally and internationally – with people who are taking a proactive stance to the threats posed by climate change, peak oil, resource limitations, and economic contraction. These are big scary problems, but there is plenty that we can do as grassroots citizens. Our project will lead to greater awareness of the issues, with more people striving to prepare our city and its citizens for the realities of the future.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Changing the Course of the Alzheimer’s Epidemic in L.A. County:  Early Detection Counts Campaign
Changing the Course of the Alzheimer’s Epidemic in L.A. County: Early Detection Counts 12 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Due to health care reform, there is an opportunity now for transformational change in medical care. This change provides a chance to alter the course of the Alzheimer’s epidemic; to change how people with cognitive impairment are viewed and treated; and to change the quality of life of the people who care for them. Intervention now can save our region millions of dollars in unnecessary costs for hospitalizations and nursing home care. It can remove a predictable threat to the solvency of our public health care system. </p> <p>Changing the course of the epidemic in L.A. County– Currently, the numbers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are poised to skyrocket. Among Latinos and Asians, the increases will be most dramatic. Yet, due to nihilism and lack of accurate information, health care providers are not recognizing the disease and do not diagnose or treat the great majority of cases. These individuals are doubly victimized by their conditions. They suffer the relentless loss of their minds, and are frequently misunderstood and mistreated, by their families and by health care providers. This project will dramatically increase the detection of dementing diseases by our region’s health care providers and result in improved treatment and care.</p> <p>Saving our health care system – Unrecognized cognitive impairment is expensive. It creates barriers to the management of co-morbid health conditions such as diabetes and cardio-vascular disease. It leads to poor management of the needs of the patient. It drives up expenditures for Medicare, MediCal and private insurance. Several research studies have demonstrated that better detection, treatment and care management can lead to lower expenditures for emergency room visits, hospital stays, and doctor visits. Better care and access to community supports may also reduce expensive and unnecessary stays in nursing homes. This level of care can cost $90,000 or more per year and is born by families and the MediCal program. Better managed care will reduce costs to the private and public health care systems resulting in economic benefit to the government, employers and individual households.</p> <p>Changing the lives of families - Early detection means that families and patients will gain access to better quality health care and supports. L.A.’s caregiving families will suffer less burden and depression. They will be better shielded from financial devastation because recognition of dementing conditions will help with their management and with the management of co-morbid conditions like diabetes and heart disease. Better understanding of cognitive impairment will allow families more opportunity to plan for the future and get appropriate care. This is turn will lead to reduced absenteeism both at work for adults and in school for children in households dealing with the overwhelming burden of caregiving. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Children Mending Hearts: Kids Helping Kids
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

If we want to see long-term, sustained improvements in Los Angeles’ Social Connectedness, then we need to connect with Los Angeles youth at a formative age, so that volunteerism, empathy and community engagement become a routine and expected part of their lives. Here’s how our project will benefit Los Angeles and its citizens: Over the next five years, our project will: - Enroll at least 3,100 local youth in a sustained, hands-on educational program that teaches volunteerism, civic engagement, empathy skills and Global Citizenship; - Provide those students with meaningful, hands-on volunteer projects that encourage them to keep up to date on current events, “practice” their social activism skills and gain confidence in their ability to effect positive change in their communities; - Offer safe and supportive after school environments in neighborhoods currently challenged by drugs and gang violence; - Use our social media, marketing and outreach resources to continue promoting the importance of teaching L.A. youth about Global Citizenship and community engagement; - Teach cultural appreciation and racial tolerance by integrating many of Los Angeles’ rich, multicultural artistic and cultural traditions into our after school curriculum; - Use our public outreach events and High School Advisory Council to bring together youth from diverse neighborhoods throughout Los Angeles, affording them opportunities to work together on youth-based charitable and humanitarian issues. Our project’s impact on LA 2050 indicators includes: Social Connectedness – Our project directly teaches Social Connectedness (volunteerism, civic engagement, positive social skills and empathy skills) to youth at a formative point in their development. By reaching our goal of enrolling 620 youth annually in our Global Arts After School, we will educate as many as 22,200 students by 2050, helping them develop and solidify their identities as voters, community activists and Global Citizens; Education – Participating youth will receive quality, in-depth instruction in Global Citizenship, current events and fine arts – subjects only minimally covered in many public school classrooms; Public Safety – 90% of our programs sites are in neighborhoods where gang activities and youth violence are problematic. Over 550 youth each year will benefit from the safe, structured, off-the-streets programming we provide free of charge. Arts & Multiculturalism – Through the Global Arts After School Project, two of Los Angeles’ strongest assets – the arts and a richly multicultural population – will be used as powerful teaching tools for building positive social change in local youth.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Children's Counseling Program at POV
Children's Counseling Program at POV 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Children’s Program addresses two critical needs in Los Angeles: (1) the need for services that help children heal from the effects of witnessing relationship violence, thus breaking the intergenerational cycle of violence; and (2) the need for services to be inclusive of boys and men in a service sector that has previously focused primarily on meeting the needs of women. There is a tremendous gap in services in Los Angeles specifically directed to reversing the long-term effects that children who witness or experience family violence endure. By establishing an independent program for these children, POV will meet an important need – one with long-term implications for the health and safety of the children who will be healed, and their future families. Research over a 20 year period consistently demonstrates a direct relationship between witnessing or experiencing domestic violence as a child, and adopting high risk behaviors later in life. With the input of mental health professionals, POV has reviewed literature on how violence affects the brains of children and youth who witness it or are victims, and how this damage can be healed. POV staff members will optimize the latest treatment modalities recommended by experts in the field that are designed to help heal the affects of violence and post-traumatic stress disorder in children. Over the years, POV has become increasingly aware of the ways in which men and boys are affected by relationship and sexual violence, and has reached out to include men on the staff and in the leadership of our programs, including the involvement of boys in our youth leadership programs. We are especially concerned that 1 in 6 boys are identified as victims of child sexual abuse and few services are available to address this trauma. The Children's Program will provide free counseling services to meet the needs of boys and their families. By serving child victims in the context of a comprehensive approach to prevent intimate violence, we believe more young people will seek treatment for their abuse at an earlier age. This will transform their lives in a way that nurtures compassion and caring rather than perpetuation of the cycle of abuse.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Chinatown Food Hub
Chinatown Food Hub 28 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our vision is to have a triple bottom line: support local businesses and farms, provide vital sustenance to local communities, and support a greener environment. <p> Chinatown is home to over 15 markets that sell Asian produce. Currently many of these markets are getting the last pick of produce from suppliers because they cannot compete with the big box retailers; according to the owners, the profit margins are extremely narrow. With the regional food hub model, we would directly source to these markets and corner stores at an affordable rate while simultaneously reducing a key contributer to LA's pollution problem. <p> By connecting local businesses directly to local farmers, we have the ability to improve economic, health, and environmental outcomes in our community in the following ways: <p> • For every $100 spent at a local business, $45 stays in the community, compared to only $13 if the money is spent at a national chain store. <p> • Most chain stores source their produce from thousands of miles away, whereas our model will be sourcing produce from 200 miles away, significantly lowering our carbon footprint. <p> • Improving the type and quality of produce available will increase access, consumption, and demand of healthy, high quality, locally grown food by residents. <p> The regional food hub not only supports and grows the capacity of local small businesses, but it also helps do the same for the farmers we will work with. The regional food hub will invest funds early to developing our small business partners within the community. Workshops and capacity building for the local farmers and the small business owners we will be working with will be crucial in how well this model performs. By having stronger small businesses, Los Angeles will see great benefits not only from greater access to healthy food, but also from greater economic output and cleaner air. If we succeed in reducing just 0.01% of our food miles we will have 25 tons fewer of global warming gases in LA. <p> Here are some of the current facts about health in LA County: <p> • In LA City Council District 1, which includes Chinatown, adult obesity rates are at 23.3% and childhood obesity rates are at 27.8%. (CCPHA, Obesity and Mortality Report, 2011) <p> • Asians across Los Angeles County have low rates of eating 5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day; only 35.9% of Asians eat the recommended amount of produce in a given day. (CHIS, UCLA 2009) <p> • 53.9% of Chinatown residents are not eating the recommended 5 fruits and vegetables a day. (CHIS, UCLA 2005)

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
CicLAvia: Get Connected LA 22 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Considered the most park-poor major city in the United States, Los Angeles has a major challenge in finding space for people to share positive interactions. For many neighborhoods – particularly in L.A.’s communities of color – public park space is scant or non-existent. CicLAvia temporarily eases this problem and points to a solution by providing an ad hoc public space for such neighborhoods - a newfound common ground on which to congregate and enjoy this democratic, outdoor activity.<p/> <p>As with any successful public space, CicLAvia routes offer participants diverse reasons to participate. Through CicLAvia’s organic growth, participants continually discover new purposes for converging along the route – whether one’s objective is to bike, stroll, picnic, or people-watch. This temporary public space points out the historic emphasis on private space in LA while simultaneously shifting our focus to the need for more public places and positive events throughout the city where all populations can connect as a community.<p/><p>CicLAvia is a source of civic pride for the communities it traverses, the city as a whole as well as the entire region. By connecting dozens of diverse city neighborhoods, CicLAvia encourages residents to explore resources within and beyond their own insular territory.<p/><p>Long-term effects of CicLAvia not only include increased CicLAvia events throughout the year and an expansion of the program into all corners of Los Angeles County, but a shift in public perception of Los Angeles as a car-centric metropolis. With a focus on improved public health, increased public space, enhanced community and economic development and the promotion of bicycle, pedestrian and public transportation advocacy, CicLAvia advocates for strengthened public policy in each of these areas. As a result, CicLAvia helps to transform Los Angeles County into a region that is more focused on smart growth, sustainable living and community development.<p/>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Civic Crowdfunding Platform for Local Government and Schools
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will directly benefit Los Angeles through a couple ways. First, monies will be directly contributed to the education system in the City of Los Angeles having the effect of providing relief to the strained resources the City's schools are currently operating under. Second, the communities surrounding the schools will benefit from improved services and program enhancements provided by the funds raised through ZenFunder. Finally, the Los Angeles community itself will become increasingly engaged. Our exhaustive research has show that communities are willing to fund project and become more engaged, they simply haven't had the vehicle or tools to do so.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The heat-trapping properties of global warming pollutants are undisputed. The fact that human activities generate these global warming pollutants is also undisputed. With more than 15 years of observed and studied scientific data, we now understand the climate system and its relationship to human activities. There is consensus among the IPCC and scientists about the reality of global warming. Although there may be uncertainty about exactly when, where and how the earth’s climate will respond to global warming pollutants, there is no dispute, and observations indicate, that detectable warming changes are already under way. Natural and human factors can both affect the average temperature of our planet. Natural variability in the Earth’s climate system can cause small changes over decades to centuries. Industrialization has increased that rate, so that 80% of the current global carbon dioxide emissions result from human activities. In the 21st century, the global warming pollution that humans are causing will impact the climate tens or possibly a hundred times faster than natural rates Climate change is a challenge too important to be denied and too urgent to be ignored. As cities, we depend on materials, products and people everywhere, and, as such, we need to work together to manage our world. In the absence of action by the federal government, US mayors are confronting climate change and working to improve the quality and livability of our cities. It isn’t so much what you do—just so long as you do it. LA County needs to be a part of taking action, and be a Climate Leader, share best practices and work with leaders to make changes to their greenhouse gas emissions. Our organization can be a facilitator of this change. The overall long-term effect of change will be an improvement in lifestyles, quality of life and livable cities. The short term costs of purchasing biodiesel can be easily offset if we prevent increases in childhood asthma rates. Carpooling can cut down on commute time since it alleviates traffic congestion, pedestrian and bicycle friendly shopping areas generate a community center, and green power can provide fixed cost procurements. We can’t afford NOT to address climate change. The potential economic costs of impacts such as flooding, drought, loss of forest and tourism, are enormous. Companies are finding that reducing emissions can actually improve operational efficiencies, reduce energy and production costs, and increase market share.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Using the LA2050 grant, Climate Resolve will help inform Los Angeles of the climate changes to come so that we can anticipate, prepare for, and reduce the impacts of climate change, while at the same time we help two of the most vulnerable communities in Los Angeles identify solutions and mobilize to take action to make their neighborhood better, stronger, and more resilient to climate change. But our vision extends well beyond the work we will do in 2013-2014. Climate Resolve will leverage our experience, successes, lessons learned, and new partnerships developed with the LA2050 seed funding to scale-up the process into a long-term, city-wide effort of coordinated community-based climate planning and engagement. Climate Resolve will be a “big tent” where non-profit organizations, businesses, civic leaders, and communities can convene to help one another prepare for climate change.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Collaborative 360 – Creating Successful Pathways to 2050
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

In addition to using our strategies for cross collaborations of services, business industries and community, C-360 will create a unique business incubator; one focused on helping low-income individuals that are struggling to start or maintain a business, without continued support. So often, these poverty-stricken entrepreneurs are trying to work from home without adequate support, training, and business camaraderie that aids with creativity, improved strategies and more. As recent as this month (March 2013), Best Buy and Yahoo have called back into the office their virtual employees for these same reasons. It’s apparent that our proposed service area is a compilation of high and low-income individuals (South LA), which presents huge gaps that must be considered, i.e., from unemployed/underemployed, crime, gangs, and cultural differences between black and brown communities; to the other side of the coin; comprised of the more affluent areas around USC, Staples Center, LA Live, etc. – where we must work on retaining large and small businesses, that will not sustain without continual growth in the surrounding areas. As stated before, though much growth is evident in some areas, the composition of the surrounding neighborhoods are complicated with many nuances: • Approximately 36% of the population lives below the poverty level (state average 14%) • There are more than 7,000 single-parent households - 5,000+ being lead by women • Nearly 60% of the population has less than a high school education • Much of the area is plagued with excessive crime; severe cultural differences; high instances of homelessness, and more K.I.’s vast experience in social advocacy, community development, and small business creation, positions us to develop workable solutions to create jobs for the hard-to-employ; implement programs to aid and empower disenfranchised populations; improve public safety, and execute effective strategies that will cross industries, cultures, and biases for economic sustainability. One of our prime strategies is small business creation through for-profit and nonprofit collaborations, which aids in small business creation. In order for small businesses to serve their historic roles as the catalyst for job creation, they must have a support system, to remain competitive in today’s global marketplace. Our target populations must have the confidence and ability to invest in this economy to create jobs – thus is the need for C-360’s business and community supportive services. Though thousands of organizations offer various aspects of job, career or business training, few facilities offer capacity building, or business incubation for our target populations of individuals with great minds and ability, but lack the advanced training and socioeconomic means to advance their dreams and skills. C-360's strategies are designed to create on-going positive change, which can serve as a pilot for other underserved populations.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
College Bus: Driving LA’s Low-Income Youth Towards a College Education
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>The College Bus will benefit LA by systematically ensuring that the <b>most academically at-risk students are exposed to college, college-ready, and ultimately college-bound.</b> This will immediately include exposing a full student body of 450 to college and providing follow-up that results in A-G requirement completion; improved CAHSEE, PSAT, and SAT scores; and more college-ready students applying to college and enrolling with the necessary financial aid and scholarships. By piloting a scalable model, the impact of Bresee's College Bus will not only be felt in our corner of the city, but eventually across LA. After successfully implementing this program at CCVHS, the model may be replicated by Bresee at any of the 10 high schools (with almost 11,000 students total) in a three-mile radius of Bresee. This would allow us to progress towards a day when all of the high school students in the Rampart area have been exposed to college and are college-ready. <b>The model may also be adapted and replicated by other non-profits, to methodically ensure that all 1,632,427 students attending public schools in LA are college-ready.</b></p> <p>The majority of people that Bresee serves live in an area called the Rampart Gang Reduction Youth Development (GRYD) Zone. This is the most densely populated area in LA, with an estimated 75,000 residents, the highest concentration of recent immigrants in LA and 805 active gang members, responsible for nearly one-quarter of the city's gang-related crimes (Advancement Project, 2008). It is estimated that 90% or more of the students Bresee serves are at the low to very low-income level. The area has an unemployment rate of 11% (Urban Institute), compared to 6% countywide (2010 Census). The majority of the students that Bresee serves attend schools in the bottom 10% of schools statewide, with the lowest graduation rates in the city (California Department of Education, 2013), and only 25% of graduates complete necessary college prep coursework (Rampart GRYD Assessment, 2008). In 2012, 100% of Bresee's scholarship recipients were the first in their family to go to college.</p> <p>By targeting the most at-risk youth with college prep and exposure services, the College Bus will create a culture of college-readiness in partner schools, resulting in a wave of students like Laura, an undocumented student who was hesitant about college due to finances. She got college prep through Bresee, earned a Bresee scholarship, and is now attending CalState, Dominguez Hills. Laura states, "Without Bresee, I wouldn't be where I am today." Or a wave of students like Mario, who attributes the 100-point increase in his SAT score, which landed him in his dream school (University of Oregon), to Bresee's SAT class. When the College Bus program is replicated across the city, not only will there be more Laura's and Mario's, but there will be long-term implications on the economic and social climate of the city at large (see below).</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
College Track: Creating a Pathway to College in Boyle Heights
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Only one-third of Boyle Heights residents 25 years-old or older have a high school diploma, and only 5% of these residents have a college degree. Additionally, close to 50% of students from Boyle Heights never complete high school. On a host of academic measures, schools in Boyle Heights have historically been very low performing. In 2010, 41% of Roosevelt High School students graduated high school in four years, and only 22% of those graduates were eligible to attend a four-year university. At Hollenbeck Middle School, only 6% of 8th grade students scored proficient or advanced in math and 19% in English language arts (ELA). At Roosevelt High School, only 5% of students are proficient or advanced in math and 26% in ELA. We intend to change all of this. College Track's services are linked to a proven model of college preparation and success. Over the past 16 years, 100% percent of our seniors graduate high school compared to an average of 50% in the districts we serve, over 90% are admitted to a four-year school compared to roughly 15% of students of the same demographic, and 80% of students who completed our high school program have graduated from, or are still attending college. Over time, CT increases the number of college bound students of color in each of the districts and cities we serve. For example, in 2008 when we opened our center in San Francisco’s Bayview Hunter’s Point neighborhood, only 6 African-American students graduated from the neighborhood high school eligible to attend a 4-year university. Since graduating our first class in San Francisco in 2012, we have sent 120 students to college from the Bayview, and we are poised to increase the San Francisco Unified School District’s college bound African-American students by 30% by 2016. We expect to see similar results and impact for our Boyle Heights center. Specifically, this work will benefit Los Angeles by: 1) Positively impacting academic outcomes for Boyle Heights, Roosevelt High School, and in time, the LAUSD. 2) Creating a pathway to college for underprivileged students in Boyle Heights who would not have the opportunity to pursue a 4-year degree were it not for our support. 3) Transforming Boyle Heights into a community where it is the expectation, not the exception, for students to pursue and obtain a 4-year degree. 4) Contributing to the economic vitality of the city, by creating a strong, educated work force in one of the city’s most vulnerable neighborhoods.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Communities In Schools of Los Angeles: A Vision of 100% Graduation in LAUSD
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

In 2012, Communities In Schools commissioned a national economic impact study to quantify its economic and social returns to society through a rigorous third-party investment analysis. Conducted by EMSI, one of the nation’s leading economic modeling firms, the study found that every dollar invested in Communities In Schools of Los Angeles generates $38.00 in economic benefit for the community. Students who earn a high school diploma have been shown to earn over $300,000 more over the course of their lifetime than peers who drop out. Businesses benefit by having a more skilled and productive workforce, taxpayers benefit through a broadening tax base, and the public generally benefits from reduced social costs attributed to dropping out of high school, such as crime and unemployment. Despite LAUSD’s 64.2% graduation rate, in 2012 96% of CIS of Los Angeles students graduated on-time from high school. The benefits to our community are much more than merely subjective. What does all of this mean? A $100,000 grant from the Goldhirsh Foundation through LA2050 would result in $3,800,000 in economic benefits to Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Community Builders Resource Network (CBRN)
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Through targeted development of its existing, non profits. If each of them could be improved by 15%, the impact would be profound.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Connecting Angelenos Through Smart, Engaging Neighborhood Maps
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Coming on the heels of the extremely low voter turnout in the recent local election (20 percent), it is clear that Los Angeles is grappling with widespread apathy and low civic engagement. Part of the problem has to do with the lack of a sense of community and connectivity among residents.</p> <p>The geography of the city is partially to blame for this. The vastness of the region and the varying municipalities are such that a sense of a unified city does not resonate. A beautifully rendered map displaying how we are all connected, which is enriched with real time information and the tools necessary to engage local residents in each individual neighborhood, will bring about a new level of awareness, activity, and involvement.</p> <p>The project would serve as a case study for public/private collaboration in Los Angeles. This week the L.A. City Council is strategizing about how to create the city’s first open-data initiative, which would include the coordination and participation of multiple departments. Data from city agencies would be openly shared with the public and between city departments with an eye towards launching a pilot program in June 2013. The timing for a potential coordination between L.A. Currents’ smart map, served by a virtual treasure trove of pertinent, unreleased public data, is serendipitous.</p> <p>We live in the most information-rich period in human history, but many people in Los Angeles are not getting the right information in the right format to help increase their civic awareness. For centuries, maps have provided structure, guidance, and helped activate new ways of seeing the world. Today is no different.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Craft Meets Impact: Hub LA Media Lab
Craft Meets Impact: Hub LA Media Lab 20 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Hub LA Media Lab provides solutions based on these three core assumptions: Meaningful storytelling creates change. Stories connect people. Storytelling is the single most powerful way to move people towards empathy and action. For a social entrepreneur, storytelling expresses the “why” and sets a brand apart in the marketplace, expanding impact, audience, and reach. Top-down Hollywood Studio model is becoming less relevant. Audiences are hungry for meaningful, authentic stories and original content. Studios are designed to prioritize the bottom line over content, reducing all projects to profit maximizing endeavors. New disruptive models are changing the entertainment industry. Whether it is more accessible technology to create content or new platforms to distribute and consume media, the entertainment industry and the studio model is in flux. New distribution models and ideas will soon need to be embraced. IDENTIFIED NEED: After surveying a significant sample of LA’s multimedia professionals, we’ve found three critical roadblocks impeding them from attaining their full potential: -High costs associated with production & post-production facilities -Limited access to talented collaborators for feedback & peer review -Difficulty reaching appropriate distribution channels MEDIA LAB SOLUTION Anchored by a physical space with the needed technical equipment to create multimedia and visual arts projects, and hosting a community of independent artists and social entrepreneurs, the Media Lab space will be a new beacon for the Arts and Culture sector and allow Angelenos to: Access professional facilities and equipment as well as a dedicated community diverse enough to provide for all talent required when producing a project; Expand the impact of the social entrepreneurs and changemakers through visual media and storytelling resources and thereby amplify Los Angeles creative and social good sectors, thus attracting new talent from around the world; Explore how the artists and professional content creators, when connected with social entrepreneurs and socially-minded investors, gain the skills needed to sustain themselves and accelerate the creation and dissemination of their own projects; and Through the Global Hub Network, connect with new national and global models of collaborative funding and legal structures being tested such as Seed and Spark and TrustArt that spur arts and culture. Media Programs will include: Artist-in-Resident program dedicated to building a library of data visualizations and furthering how digital artists can help foster social innovation; specific focus on education and environmental justice. Diversity Programing that include mentorship from across town including: Project Involve, Sundance Labs, Fox Diversity Program, Universal Pictures Diversity Writers Program, Disney Writing Programs, USC and UCLA Film School programs, Tribeca Film Festival Social Innovators

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Craft Services
Craft Services
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The fact is that the arts foster creativity, innovation, good health and happiness. National studies show that early and successful gateway arts experiences create life-long participation in and enthusiasm for the arts. Yet the people of our communities, schools and after-school programs are struggling with ever-increasing funding challenges. Studies also show that individuals and families that play together create stronger positive bonds and a deeper experience of connectedness. With the support of this LA2050 grant, Participlay can expand the reach of our art+play initiatives into the LA communities, bringing the opportunity to create individual and group artworks that are largely made of re-purposed materials. Many of the neighborhoods we hope to serve, have ethnic and native language diversity and kids on the school lunch program. Others have rigorous academic programs, but limited opportunities for arts and creative expression. This art+play initiative will: Build Arts Audiences/Make the Arts Accessible Engage Young People in Active, Hands-on Experiences Train new Leaders & Mentoring Youth Prepare Innovators for Tomorrow

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Create LA: Free Art Classes for Kids 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Only through the deliberate shift of skills, trades, and ideas can we succeed in engaging the next generation of thriving artists and creative thinkers. Create LA was formed in direct response to the problem of lacking affordable arts education among today’s youth. The organization has begun to engage the public via numerous offerings including after school programs, weekend workshops, and community art instruction. Over time the Create LA facility will grow to be an invaluable resource and engaging community space. The Los Angeles community will benefit from our presence as an institution of art, education, business, and creativity. As arts enhance culture, Create LA will be adding to the cultural vitality of Los Angeles, while directly serving youth with quality arts programming. Create LA youth will also get first-hand experience with the business of art through exhibition in regular gallery shows, where kids can familiarize themselves with the presentation process of visual art while participating in exhibits and events. Create LA will have the opportunity to encourage artistic exploration in youth, expose young people to career paths in visual arts, and provide them with on-site artist role models in the invested Keystone Studios.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Creating a Positive Learning Environment
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Playworks inclusive approach to play gets all kids active during recess and offers more opportunities for vigorous movement throughout the day. The link between physical activity and children’s performance in school is becoming more and more clear. As reported by the New York Times in April, 2011, “...the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a meta-review of 50 studies and found ‘substantial evidence’ that school-based physical activity ‘can help improve academic achievement, including grades and standardized test scores.’ Educators need not worry about losing precious teaching time: the report found ‘no evidence that time spent in recess had a negative association with cognitive skills, attitudes or academic behavior.’” A randomized controlled trial of Playworks found that children in Playworks schools spent more time at recess engaging in vigorous physical activity than children in control schools. Every year, as one of our internal evaluation methods, Playworks conducts surveys of principals and teachers at our partner schools to help us learn more about the impact of our program. Survey results from our Southern California partner schools for the 2011-2012 school year showed that: -91 percent reported an increase in the level of participation in academic activities; -89 percent reported an increase in students’ abilities to focus on class activities; -78 percent reported a decrease in the incidents of bullying during recess; -81 percent reported that the transition time from recess to classroom instruction decreased, which enabled teachers to reclaim at least 19 hours of teaching time over the course of the school year; -92 percent reported that Playworks had a positive effect on overall school climate. We expect similar or better results in the coming school years in Southern California. Playworks positively impacts children’s physical, cognitive and social development. Through our five-component program (recess facilitation, in-class game time, the Junior Coach Program, before and/or after-school programming, developmental sports leagues), Playworks transforms the playground into a place where students learn essential skills such as teamwork, conflict resolution, empathy, and fair play. Educators and staff at our partner schools tell us that we have helped them create a safer, more inclusive school climate with student leaders who are able to engage respectfully with peers and adults and contribute to a positive learning environment. Playworks' ultimate goal is to create an educational environment where students learn how to interact with their peers in appropriate and respectful ways, practice safe and healthy behaviors, take on meaningful leadership roles, and become the focused learners their parents and teachers want them to be.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Creative Activist Program
Creative Activist Program 11 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Transcending the binds that educational attainment often places on individuals’ exposure to and opportunities for engagement, CAP will strengthen social connectedness throughout LA by cultivating creative activist projects that offer social interaction, civic engagement, and volunteer opportunities. CAP inherently affects LA2050’s metrics for social connectedness. Regarding social interaction, CAP not only provides Angelenos with the ON Revolution resource-rich social networking site to communicate and collaborate around projects and issues alike, but it also offers the LA community a wide variety of events. Aside from the LA Creative Activist Conference, Angelenos will now be able to attend an ON Rev Speaker Series event every 4-6 weeks. Additionally, at our Dan Eldon Center for Creative Activism in Malibu, we host gallery openings, monthly Sundowners for creative activists to meet and mingle from April through September, and Sack Lunches for Angelenos interested in creative activism to come learn more. Recently, we’ve begun hosting occasional screenings and even held small festivals at our Center as well. Separately, our 45+ creative activists and their projects host an array of satellite events around LA, from fundraisers to awareness events, available to the broader LA community. Regarding civic engagement, each of CAP projects offers individuals numerous points of entry to mobilize personally and as a community around issues that matter most to them. As a media and art centered source for engagement, we meet citizens at the core of what inspires them, and these projects call on the community to take action. For our creative activists, action can take many different forms – from a Global Day of Play for a Cardboard Challenge to a screening and discussion around global poverty and microfinance. Action can also mean donating to a cause to sustain its work or signing a petition to influence institutional change. Regarding volunteerism, CAP and the projects under its umbrella survive thanks to volunteers, and we have a bottomless well of opportunities for volunteers to get involved. The media and arts component of CAP functions as that entry point for the average, uninspired, uninvolved citizen to become inspired and get involved. And with inspired, involved, invested citizens, LA has the potential to flourish as a community and tap into its own spark to ignite change both locally and globally.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Creative Capital: A campaign for a healthy & prosperous Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

A broad, robust, and diverse investment in arts and culture will ensure a healthy and prosperous Los Angeles. Great cities invest in arts and culture to the level they invest in infrastructure, education, business, and health. Creative Capital LA will generate the public support that LA2050 cites as critical to ensuring the vitality not only of arts and culture, but of the city itself. Creative Capital LA will lead to “coherent arts-nurturing” policies that strengthen not only the arts & culture indicator, but also several other indicators, such as Income & Employment, which will benefit from job growth in the creative economy. Creative Capital LA will expand every resident’s ability to participate in arts advocacy by democratizing the tools and expanding our Social Connectedness when we recognize ourselves and our communities as “Creative Capitals.” After Arts & Culture Vitality, Education is the indicator that would be most affected by the public engagement made possible by Creative Capital LA. The majority of low-income students have little to no access to arts education. One of the reasons arts education is so important for low-income students is that it directly addresses the student achievement gap. Studies have shown that arts education improves literacy, numeracy, school attendance (and as a result, lowers the dropout rate), and parental engagement (Youth ARTS Development Project, 1996, U.S. Department of Justice; Arts Education Partnership, CAAE.) At-risk students who have access to the arts in or out of school also tend to have better academic results, better workforce opportunities, and more civic engagement, according to a new NEA report, The Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth (2012). By promoting arts education and its connection to 21st century skills. Creative Capital LA will increase public support for education reform and make a complete education possible for LA County’s 1.6 million public school students. We imagine a Los Angeles County in which every young person develops the skills to succeed in our creative industries, from fashion to film, visual art to visual effects, design to drama. And when artists, creative entrepreneurs, and forward thinkers engage with our elected officials, our collaborative thinking will push Los Angeles to the forefront of American creativity and innovation.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Creative Placemaking in Downtown L.A.
Creative Placemaking in Downtown L.A. 8 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project serves to enhance the lives of hundreds each year by creating jobs, access to affordable housing, and providing spatial resources specifically for the support of artists and their creative processes. It will keep balance between residents, artists, officials, developers and business owners by giving a common ground for discussion, education, community gatherings, social and commercial connectivity. The creation of similar centers throughout Los Angeles will disseminate like values and opportunities for other communities, based on their specific needs. This will have a direct impact on each key indicator mentioned in the LA2050 Report. • Education – Studies conducted by the California Alliance for Arts Education show that arts education engages students in learning and helps prepare our youth to meet expectation of the 21st century workforce. By offering arts education outside the K-12 system, we encourages life-long learning. • Income and Employment – Art Share’s proposed model creates on-going, entry-level jobs and entrepreneurial opportunities. Proven to revitalize local economies, Art Share L.A. will attract new businesses, new tourists and new commerce—creating jobs across multiple sectors. • Housing – Development of centers like Art Share L.A. increases access to creative and affordable live/work/rehearsal space. Art Share L.A. contributes 30-live/work lofts to the market. • Environmental Quality – If we can lessen the need for day-to-day travel while increasing public transportation, we will see a significantly stronger impact in our environmental quality. As neighborhoods develop around their respective creative centers, the need to travel for basic amenities and entertainment will decrease. • Public Safety – As people take ownership over their communities and begin connecting with one another through participation in artistic and cultural activities, official or unofficial ‘neighborhood watch’ goes into effect. Studies show that participants in cultural events and activities are more likely to be civically engaged—enabling them to organize and function stronger as communities. • Social Connectedness – Through the Work Exchange program, we encourage volunteerism in the community and give opportunity for everyone to feel valued and involved in the arts. Art is often intertwined with political, environmental and larger societal issues. By nature of association, residents participating in cultural activities will be more aware and more socially connected. • Arts and Cultural Vitality – Creation of such art centers throughout Los Angeles will provide access to physical space for creation and an intangible system of support that nurtures artistic endeavors by providing local touring networks and monetizable opportunities.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>To date, we have held partnerships with several schools in Los Angeles including Pio Pico Elementary, Sixth Avenue Elementary, the UCLA Community school and Dorris Place Elementary. Our flagship partnership is at Dorris Place Elementary. Dorris Place has worked very closely with us to isolate students struggling the most and place them in an after-school program. With our tutors working with their students, we have found major improvements not only in test scores, but in attitude as well. Dorris Place represents the model we hope to replicate in every school in the district that is home to underserved communities. Outside of schools, we have also partnered with School On Wheels, whose mission is to enhance educational opportunities for homeless children in grades K-12 in the Los Angeles area. Our platform has enabled their volunteer tutors from around the nation to continue to tutor students who have been forced to move to new homeless shelters. </p> <p>All of our partners have benefitted from our services and will see those benefits increased many times from an enhanced focus on the individual needs of the student. This is what the APPM provides. The individual experience will help teachers and administrators identify problem areas for students and fix them with Learn To Be tutors at their side. </p> <p>Ultimately, the true benefit for Los Angeles will come when all struggling students are provided the individualized attention they deserve and the APPM combined with Learn To Be tutoring can serve that function. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Cypress Village Underground Tunnel Art Walk Gallery and Economic Vitality
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Cypress Village Underground Tunnel Art walk, will have amny benefits for the great city. It will be the pilot program and example on how to utilize an existing historic relic. The media exposure is arming up with confirmations of local media and some main stream media buzz. This grant will enable us to secure its success rate and to expand the concept into different parts of the city and county as well. The economic resonance will vibrate far beyond 2050, because it will allow our city to flourish in the arts above other cities. We lack green space/ parks and this project will guaranteed we create our own community park in the middle of an asphalt street, formerly used to carry cars. Our city is becoming a bike commuting society and the bike corrals installed on the stretch will allow us to promote the new lifestyle. In fact, we have already reduced crime on the corridor by eliminating blight and bringing in trendy awesome community minded businesses and people to help organize the forth coming event.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
DIY Social Spaces
DIY Social Spaces 44 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our vision for 2050 is a city where DIY social spaces are more common than gas stations, Starbucks, liquor stores or police cars. A city where each neighborhood, each set of blocks, has its neighborhood space where people regularly meet, catch-up on the news and gossip, hatch new projects and just enjoy being connected. The challenge in LA is that even the small park or plaza can take years to get approved and built and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more. In contrast, our Community Living Rooms or Salas Publicas, just take weeks to build and cost less than $5,000. The keys elements are: • Tapping neighborhood volunteers wealth of knowledge, skills and commitment. • Creating and building simple, functional designs together using basic, available materials. • Taking advantage of available land—in alleys, sidewalksidewalks, adjacent to churches, temples, non-profits and collaborating businesses • Improving spots where people already gather—at bus stops, by the corner store, at the entrance to the alley. This project pulls people out of their homes, brings neighbors together to work together, builds social relationships while transforming an underutilized space into a play space for the community. It combines DIY culture with community building, with members donating their own time and labor to beautify and change how they use their alleys and local spaces. All of LA also benefits in the following ways from our project: • engages and demonstrates how a small group of neighbors can create their own mobile source of space given limited space across the city • triggers a chain reaction of neighborhood change – once neighbors see the changes they make, they join or invite others to build new projects. • It challenges the car culture – to get out and work with your neighbors to build something that is shared in the local neighborhood. • It creates safe streets and neighborhood engagement in creating in addressing public safety • It builds community networks across communities • It is an intergenerational approach involving neighbors of all ages and all backgrounds.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

With over half a million residents employed in the arts, it’s evident that Los Angeles abounds with talent, and we call upon innovators and arts professionals to share their what they know with others through talks, workshops, and exhibitions. We bring people and resources together, catalyzing an exchange of ideas and knowledge, and encouraging collaborative projects beneficial to Los Angeles – from public outreach to innovative projects that blur the boundaries of art, social engagement, and technology. Funding for public arts education is waning, but we believe that people of all ages and backgrounds should have access to the tools and knowledge that will allow them to realize their greatest ideas. By offering programs designed for various age groups, we will help our students develop their creative talents, and equip them to change the world. We will remove the barriers created by the necessity for highly specialized supplies and equipment, by creating a fully equipped studio space – allowing Angelenos an opportunity to learn in a guided, collaborative environment. Members of the DIYFO community will also be encouraged to contribute their unique abilities to our workshops and events. We will empower talented people to achieve great things, spurring a culture shift that encourages creative community engagement.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Dancescape Ed
Dancescape Ed 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

My project will benefit Los Angeles through: 1. INCREASED ACCESS TO ARTS EDUCATION. As increased emphasis is placed on standardized testing, in many schools there is little room left for an arts curriculum. Furthermore, arts and music education budgets are often the first to be cut, despite the proven impact these programs have. Educatoors working in this space have defined dance as contributing to the development of a positive self concept, and a high self concept has a positive relationship with high academic standards. Studies have shown that students who engage with dance education are more likely to be well versed in critical and creative thinking, as dance asks students to problem solve, to think, to question, and to present material in an original way. The physicality of dance classes give students the chance to experience something other than pencil and paper, and is a progressive environment which allows students to make mistakes, but get better. The performance aspect of the program helps to instill discipline, commitment, improve team building skills, and build self-confidence. It also helps to produce more involved parents and teachers, which helps support a more successful overall school environment. 2. INCREASED ACCESS AND EXPOSURE TO THE PERFORMING ARTS. The Dancescape showcase is an all ages event, and often features student performers. We ensure that ticket prices are affordable for parents, friends, and other family members who want to come and enjoy the show. People have the opportunity to watch more than 150 different performers take the stage in tap, ballet, jazz, modern, contemporary, Bollywood, and numerous other types of dance pieces; many audience members experiences some dance styles for the first time at our events. Many of our performers are industry leaders in their fields, whether it be touring with popstars like Justin Timberlake, or principal ballerinas from the Cuban National Ballet. We select venues with an intimate feel, so that the nuances of the performances can be experienced by all in attendance. We also ensure a fun but comfortable night club setting, so that no patron feels out of place. The educational component of our program plays a huge role in increasing exposure to the performing arts by giving students the opportunity to participate in dance that they may not have had otherwise. 3. COMMUNITY BUILDING. Because we draw from the entire dance community for our performances, people from all over Southern California come together at our events. Also, because we include students from a wide variety of both scholastic programs and private dance studios, the younger performers get the opportunity to meet and perform alongside groups from completely different geographic, socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds than their own

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Dear Los Angeles
Dear Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

I've lived in Los Angeles for 12 years, first moving here from Connecticut to attend film school at USC. Since then, I've seen many people move here and leave, and become angry and agitated about Los Angeles. They viewed it as a city with no art, no connectedness, and no real opportunities. However, the reason I love L.A. and have stayed here for so long is because of the art, the culture, and the limitless potential I find here. I've received and witnessed endless opportunities, and I want to convey that to the people around me. By conveying that excitement, we will mobilize hundreds of people across the greater metro area to get involved in beautification projects and voter initiatives. We can motivate people to volunteer as a social activity, as well as an important lifelong goal. We hope to engage in early outreach, in order to get ahead of the trends and the important movements, instead of just following them.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Departures Youth Voices Mobile Classroom
Departures Youth Voices Mobile Classroom
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

According to the LA2050 Report, education in Los Angeles is “a significant impediment to human development.” A harsh reality for the almost 2 million students in L.A. County. The facts are abundantly clear that a high percentage of students are not receiving the kind of education that engages and nurtures their interests, or offered the support they need to identify and connect their interests to academic success and career opportunities. This is one reason for the large number of disengaged students and dropouts (i.e. lost students) in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD.) Departures Youth Voices knits together these crucial elements in its media literacy curriculum. The program uses digital media as an engagement and creative tool that empowers today’s youth to become civically engaged and active participants in their community. The development and launch of the Youth Voices Mobile Classroom will increase the number of participating students from schools and organizations lacking in digital media resources. Youth Voices students will gain access and insight into the new 21st century digital culture and economy, in which Los Angeles plays a major role. They will become prepared for an increasingly media-centric higher education programs in the world class universities and colleges in the Los Angeles area, as well as for taking on multiple roles in the growing media and technology industries in the city.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Destination College
Destination College 10 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

A good education is key to helping elevate individuals from the cycle of poverty. A 2009 U.S. Department of Education study showed that the average income by a high school dropout was $19,540, those with a high school diploma increased to $27,380, an associate’s degree earned an average of $36,190, and a Bachelor’s degree earned more than double a dropout salary at $46,930. These statistics clearly indicate that the average high school dropout is likely to earn wages that are below the federal poverty level and that the higher the education level, the greater chance for economic self-sufficiency. Study after study has also shown that a higher education will deter one from crime, lowering incarceration rates and also promotes a higher degree of engagement in community and civic activities. This project will lead to a better educated workforce and create a ripple effect that impacts students, parents and families, and Los Angeles businesses by 2050. The Fulfillment Fund will continue to support college access in Los Angeles while broadening our reach in partner high schools, serving more students and creating school-wide impact. There is currently a lack of opportunities for students growing up in economically and educationally under-resourced communities to get the help they need to successfully navigate the college going process. Among our students, the majority - 69% are Latino and 19% are African-American. A combined 80% of the population we serve receive free or reduced lunch. Nationally, for students from low-income families, only 54% go on to college as compared to 84% of their more affluent counterparts. By increasing student and parent participation, we can have a positive impact on these statistics and increase of number of low-income students, in particular the number of Latino and African-American students graduating high school and attending college. Our college matriculation rates over the past two years show that, as a result of our services, Fulfillment Fund students are matriculating to University of California colleges at a higher rate than Los Angeles County as a whole by a margin of 3%. They are also matriculating to California state schools at nearly double the rate of LA County overall (43% vs. 23%). Expansion of Destination College outside of current Fulfillment Fund students will allow us to serve Los Angeles students and families that are most in need by motivating students and demonstrating that college is an viable opportunity no matter what the obstacles or financial concerns.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project will benefit Los Angeles in several ways. First and foremost, it will improve direct care to the thousands of Angelenos who already have existing benign and malignant brain tumors by developing the multidisciplinary Neuro-Oncology program at LAC+USC. LAC+USC Medical Center is one of the busiest public hospitals in the western United States and the largest single provider of health care in Los Angeles County. LAC+USC records nearly 39,000 inpatient discharges, 150,000 emergency department visits, and 1 million ambulatory care visits each year. Secondly, it will help ensure that all residents of LA County have future access to a specialized Neuro-Oncology care, physicians, clinical trials, and emerging therapies for years to come, so that care provided to LAC+USC patients is on par with any National Cancer Center. When new therapies for brain cancer do emerge, having the infrastructure in place to efficiently deliver care to patients with brain cancer will be critical; The proposed clinic will help with streamlined care delivery. Thirdly, it will help develop a Center of Excellence in LA County for many years to come, serving as a structural model and network for additional specialty centers to develop. Finally, research that emerges from this program may have indirect benefits for LA residents with brain tumors for years to come. Although complete elimination of healthcare disparities in Los Angeles by 2050 is a daunting task, we aim to serve as a model program for how a group of practitioners/providers with converging goals for patients can be a Center of Excellence despite limited resources, and reduce healthcare disparities within our treatment focus area.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Digging Deeper/ Making Connections/ Doing Better
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Some suggest that museum’s have largely supplanted churches as institutions that are emblematic of American cities. For the California African American (CAAM), situated in the heart of LA, this is idea applies as related to the on-going challenge of engaging a multiplicity of demographics and subjects matters. At CAAM we go beyond daily programming to invest in developing human infrastructures and relationships that will serve the unmet needs of the local and larger community, and bring together the experiences of generations. It is in this context that we seek support for our multifaceted vision to “Dig Deeper, Connect the Dots & Do More.” CAAM is physically located in a neighborhood that was residentially Black through a good part of LA’s history. It is also in the midst of a fairly dramatic demographic shift. While nestled across from USC, the 2000 US census reveals an Exposition Park neighborhood that is 21% African American, 57% Latino and 11% White. This is also a very working class neighborhood grappling with difficult socio – economic issues such as 40% of families living in poverty with an African American unemployment rate at 13.8%, higher than any other ethnic group. CAAM has met this shift employing youth; providing wider opportunities for people of all backgrounds as a part of our exhibitions and programs; welcoming all as a part of the story of art and history that we recount from an African American voice; and promoting artists as entrepreneurs to strengthen their position economically. Even in the United Kingdom, where tradition is almost holy, they recognize that museums in the future will be “less about us as the guardians of collections and delivering our services to communities and more about us facilitating communities to celebrate their own heritage and create their own experiences using our resources (collections, buildings, people etc).”(Keith Merrin) Since our 1977 CAAM has embraced these concepts. Progress in the past 10 years in the past includes an increase in collaborations and outreach despite the economy. We are responsive and are comfortable letting our audiences have a say. This is what CAAM has done, but we need to better connect the dots between what has worked, where we have found surprise gems, change as needed and reach a new better. We exist on a mission that requires the integration of all facets of life for public engagement and enhancement. A world that requires multi and cross-cultural, discipline, education, economic, skill recycling and social integration is not new territory for CAAM. This is not and never has been a “traditional” museum, and we are proud to be grounded in such a wide berth, but now is the time for us to dig deeper into our foundation to find ways to connect successful initiatives, and incorporate in necessary elements in order to reach better.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Discovering LA’s Forgotten Landmarks: Celebrating Our Diverse Cultural History
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles has never been a monolithic city or county. The cultural and historic landmarks in LA chronicle the major developments in the city’s formation, in which people of diverse ethnicities played a crucial role. By increasing awareness of these landmarks, our project will enhance understanding and fill the knowledge gaps in LA’s history. Beyond this education, our project will increase traffic at the lesser-known landmarks. For example, there is a plaque commemorating La Mesa Battlefield, where the last battle of the war on the California front was fought in 1847, by the railroad tracks in the tiny industrial area of Vernon. Generating interest in this landmark could spur development, beautification, or perhaps green space around that city, which currently lacks parks. Specifically, this project will benefit cultural vitality in LA; ultimately, it will work towards reducing the inequity that is inherent in the county. People of diverse ethnicities were instrumental in LA’s founding and continue to play a critical role today. By making forgotten historic landmarks visible on the LA landscape, we can create a more holistic sense of place that includes all those who live in it.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Do Good Bus | Free Rides
Do Good Bus | Free Rides 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

If Do Good Bus can host multiple rides per month and offer one of them for free, we can give more Los Angelenos an opportunity to help their communities. In one year, over 1,000 people will be newly connected and if we add Do Good Field Trips to that number, we end up with 1,000 newly connected kids as well. <br> <br> One of our goals on the bus is to encourage continued support and inspire people to do good on a regular basis. For us, that doesn’t always mean returning to the cause we just visited. During a ride, passengers are not only exposed to meaningful causes they are also introduced to what it FEELS like to give back. We encourage them to harness that feeling and search for ways to find it again in their every day lives. We strongly believe that inspiration in people will continue to shape Los Angeles into a more connected place. <br> <br> In addition to one free ride per month and Do Good Field Trips, owning a bus would give us a unique opportunity to help Los Angeles in a hyper-local capacity. With 24-hour access to a vehicle equipped with supplies and enough seats for 30 willing volunteers, we’d have the capability to coordinate last minute trips to help our neighbors in a time of emergency or disaster relief. This might be the most exciting element of owning our own vehicle. <br> <br> One ride at a time, Do Good Bus can begin to shape Los Angeles into a more connected city; one with informed and inspired residents who can help one another.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Dodgeball, Prosperity and the Common Good
Dodgeball, Prosperity and the Common Good 45 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

We believe a more physically active Los Angeles means a healthier Los Angeles, but exercise is just one of many benefits and advantages The Yacht Club can bring to the neighborhoods that need it most. We also offer a safe and fun place for kids to hang-out by creating positive experiences and engaging activities, helping LA City Rec and Parks centers to become a living and breathing part of the community and a focal point for those living within it. Additionally, the art and educational programs we offer are designed to build vital skills that enhance human development, such as: confidence, critical thinking and an entrepreneurial spirit, which studies show results in more engaged young people that are more likely to avoid the juvenile court system, stay in school, and even go to college. In addition to health benefits, The Yacht Club offers Los Angeles a host of other benefits, from improved public safety and social connectedness to environmental quality. While many people living in Los Angeles have the desire and the good intentions to get out and help their community, many feel so removed from the problem that they don’t ever rustle up the determination to get involved. The Yacht Club has developed a system to draw them into the LA City Rec and Parks centers to understand the need, to experience the sense of community, and to engage in a movement of change, ultimately creating a sense of investment in their own neighborhoods - we’re shedding light on how vital it is that participants get involved in shaping our surroundings.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Dream Resource Center
Dream Resource Center
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles will benefit from higher rates of high-school graduation and increased civic engagement among youth. The proposed project will thereby advance the UCLA Labor Center’s commitment to promote access to higher education for underrepresented communities. We expect our Dream Resource Center model will provide information, leadership development opportunities, and infrastructure for building support networks among immigrant youth to be replicated on campuses throughout the city. This will increase opportunities for immigrant youth to participate in leadership development programs, promote civic engagement, and encourage greater access to higher education. Positive immigration policy change is currently being debated nationally and will happen within the near future. Immigrant youth leaders trained through this program will achieve their educational goals, emerge as leaders in their own communities, and advance policies and programs to promote immigrant integration.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
EMA PLAY:  Dance, Create, Think, Make the Future
EMA PLAY: Dance, Create, Think, Make the Future
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles will benefit by having a culturally diverse event that they can attend for free. Los Angeles based chosen artists will benefit from being showcased. Some downtown (mainly restaurant and club) businesses will benefit from increased business. The City of Los Angeles will benefit from having a cultural event that will inspire attending Angelenos to participate in our future. All showcased artists and vendors will be LA based.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
ENDLESS ORCHARD
ENDLESS ORCHARD 19 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project is uniquely tied to Los Angeles by history. Much of the land on which the city is built was once citrus orchards, most of them razed over the last century for building sites. Almost the only trace that remains is in old postcards of endless orchards with a backdrop of snow-covered mountains, the vigorous fruit contrasting against the icy peaks. These cards fed the utopian dream of California, a bountiful place where you could live in beauty and comfort. <p> Fallen Fruit’s work has often alluded to this past, a way of holding on to a utopian impulse in the middle of our urban grit. It comes with echoes of democracy, the idea of a just world in which everyone is treated equally and everyone’s needs are accounted for. <p> California has a complicated history, from its first colonization by Spanish missionaries to the rancho system, where land tracts were given to favored people as rewards, and then the Homestead Act, which tried to democratize things. One of the ideas of old West we respect was to take care of strangers and passersby — in a world without infrastructure, all people had was each other. <p> Los Angeles is now bursting with infrastructure, and a lot of it doesn’t work. We have less public green space per square mile than New York City. The idea of the commons was never particularly Californian, but it’s rooted in human culture: a space that’s shared by all, not just to look at but to graze our animals and raise our food. The commons weren’t about ownership (which was shared) but about use: who could use the land and the things it gives us.<p> Fallen Fruit’s public art projects have really arisen in the context of Los Angeles and its strange mix of density and neglect. The public agrarian experiments we propose are uniquely suited to our climate — not just the weather but also the culture. Fruit is a great tool for socially-minded artists because it never exists in isolation. Someone grows it (often in California), someone picks it (often an underpaid migrant worker), and others prepare it, serve it, and then consume it. Our work strives to connect all these relationships in surprising ways.<p> None of the fruit commonly eaten today is native to California, though much of it is grown here. We work with that fact, and see the way a bunch of fruit hanging over the sidewalk in Alhambra is also an invitation. It’s a symbol of bounty and generosity. It’s an invitation to a stranger, perhaps to you.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
ESP Team Teacher Service Learning Project
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project will: * increase academic achievement within Los Angeles * increase the Academic Performance Index of Low Performing Schools within Los Angeles * decrease the drop out rate in Los Angeles * provide a more meaningful educational experience to youth within Los Angeles * promote empathy within our Los Angeles community * create students who are socially conscious and active toward issues concerning our Los Angeles Communities. These results will directly impact Los Angeles because it will ignite a system where prople are socially engaged within their community and are addressing community needs which will positively impact our community.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
EYM's ACCESS / NO EXCUSE
EYM's ACCESS / NO EXCUSE 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Low-income children often begin kindergarten behind their peers. This “achievement gap” is well documented, and often widens as children progress through elementary school and beyond. There are many causes for this inequality, but the results are clear: high school drop-out rates for African American and Hispanic youth approach 50% in some local schools in Los Angeles. What is clear, and is consistently supported by data, is that high quality pre-K programs can have a significant impact in promoting readiness in low-income children. Just as importantly, programs that focus on parental participation and support can markedly strengthen the education children receive at home, especially for children raised in single parent homes. Some studies have shown that pre-K programs have the potential to not only significantly narrow the achievement gap, but maintain these academic gains as the child grows. The challenge remains in providing access to under-served populations. There are many barriers to reaching these under-served populations. Chief among them is access; a lack of nearby learning centers and pre-schools in low-income neighborhoods is compounded by difficulties with transportation. Just as importantly, getting families to buy into the process and believing that attending non-mandatory pre-K programs is of great benefit and importance remains a barrier.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Educating LA's Youth for a Better Future
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

“My dream is to contribute to the work NYA does and pave a way for underprivileged students to go to college….” Carol, NYA Alumna & Sophomore, Macalaster College Youth who do not complete high school will earn less over their course of their lives; are more dependent upon welfare programs; experience higher risk of serious illness and increased rates of drug use and violent crime. When a young person drops out of school, the long term negative effects are borne not just by the student but by the entire community. The strength and success of NYA’s Personal Best program has been proven. Los Angeles’ high dropout rate demonstrates the massive need for this level of individualized academic support. NYA’s Mar Vista/Venice program facility can only accommodate 100 students, yet there are thousands of youth throughout Los Angeles who need the Personal Best program. To expand students’ access to this support, NYA entered into an innovative partnership with affordable housing developers, who are required to provide specific services on site for their residents. Through this partnership, NYA has established three satellite program sites on the campuses of affordable housing developments in some of Los Angeles poorest and most underserved neighborhoods in Downtown, Mid-City and South Los Angeles. In March of 2013, NYA awarded its first college scholarships to satellite site students. Now entering year four of this pilot partnership, NYA has proven the replicability of the program and is ready to expand even further and help more youth in more neighborhoods throughout Los Angeles. Working with current affordable housing partners, NYA has identified over 350 affordable housing developments targeting over 20,000 low and moderate income families throughout the greater Los Angeles Area. In 2013, NYA will bring the program to two new satellite sites and three more in 2014. Each year, NYA will continue to add more satellite sites throughout Los Angeles. In this way, NYA will continue to expand, helping hundreds and eventually thousands of youth make their college dreams come true.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Education by Nature: Los Angeles 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

ExN:LA is a local model that meets the needs of the students, schools and communities served by the Los Angeles Unified School District. Since 1985, CNI has served over 300,000 LAUSD students with our free, outreach Nature Discovery Program and our weekly Community Nature Programs at the Magnolia Place Family Center. We know first-hand the struggles of working within such a large district and the disenfranchisement of our community. ExN:LA is built on the idea that, to improve education, LA-based nonprofit partners, teachers, students and families must work together. Evidence shows the only way to truly affect large-scale reform, whether in education, community or family development is to shift from “program delivery” to participating in a “community of practice.” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan says, “When families learn together and where schools truly become the heart and center of a neighborhood – a community anchor- there are tremendous dividends for children.” ExN:LA is exactly this kind of community anchor. Lesson plans focus on local issues, including nature in LA, the interplay of the city and its waterways, growing food in schoolyards, and changing human behavior to positively impact the world around us. The children we teach are concrete learners – they understand best the things they can see and touch. Project based learning helps children understand their place in the world and develop a connection to its care. ExN:LA helps teachers expose their students to STEM-based thinking that builds future success. Opportunities include modeling of scientific logic; professional development workshops; field trips; and lesson plans aligned with state curricula. ExN:LA benefits Los Angeles by improving the educational framework at large, making STEM subjects more accessible and addressing many of the issues we’ve had teaching STEM subjects to LA’s children. A 2011 RAND study “Preschool Adequacy and Efficiency in California,” found that 40-60% of California’s 2nd and 3rd graders are not proficient in core subjects, including STEM. Larger gaps exist for socioeconomically disadvantaged groups, including Latinos, African-Americans and English language learners, the main demographics in our community. These achievement gaps have early roots: the groups who are behind in third grade were behind when they entered kindergarten. A 2012 fact-sheet from Preschool California supports that claim, stating that early experiences –from the time children are born to the first day of kindergarten – shape whether a child’s brain develops a strong foundation for the learning, health and behavior that follow. “Early interventions for disadvantaged children are more economically efficient and produce higher returns than remedial programs to help teenagers and young adults catch up later on,” writes to James Heckman, of the University of Chicago and Nobel Laureate in Economics. ExN:LA focuses on science and nature experiences for LA’s youngest learners.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Empowering LAUSD with a Transmedia Education Platform for Change
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project will hold all stakeholders involved in and affected by LAUSD's shortcomings accountable. Once voices and concerns are amplified and a masses of Angeleno's are engaged in making critical improvements to LA's education system, the cause itself will have a ripple effect that puts LA in the spotlight to improve its current state of education. By highlighting stories of both cases - positive and negative - from students, parents, teachers, after-school programs, and the like, others in LA struggling with similar issues will be able to learn from and be inspired by one another's experiences. The underlying purpose of the project is to create accountability. By creating a massive, interconnected, real-time "story world" that addresses very specific problems with LAUSD and creative solutions for addressing its shortcomings, those in LA responsible for the problems and issues with our education system will be held publicly accountable. On top of this, after-school programs, organizations, and enterprises available to LA's K-12 students will gain more exposure and support to expand their services once their impact has been highlighted.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Empowering Teens with the Knowledge and Skills to Make Healthy Decisions
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Many LAUSD schools are opting to forego the traditional 9th grade semester-long health class, instead absorbing the minimum mandated CA Education Code HIV/AIDS prevention education into advisory or science classes. Our program is a free service to schools, and includes not only HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness education, but also education on a number of topics that have the potential to impact high school graduation rates, public safety (such as sexual assault and intimate partner violence), and the overall health and wellness of low-income communities in LA. We also increase civic participation and social connectedness in LA County by engaging college students in the communities beyond their campuses.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Empowering students thru arts and education
Empowering students thru arts and education 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The main goal of the program is to prepare students for a post-secondary degree and ensure that they enroll and graduate from a higher institution of learning. This goal will be accomplished through intense academic preparation and promotion of empowerment. A supplemental goal of the program is to engage students in a project based learning environment centered on learning communities. Forming learning communities will help students develop interpersonal communication skills. It will afford students the ability to lead as well as work cooperatively in a productive manner with their peers. Project base learning breeds empowerment through ownership. Students are more likely to be engaged when their objectives are organic. The responsibility to ascertain knowledge is transferred from teacher to student placing the teacher in the role of mediator. This act in and of its self whether or notrecognized by the host is psychologically empowering. OBJECTIVE 1: CONCEPTUALIZE THE ROLE OF COLLEGE Demystifying higher learning and the negative perceptions associated with being an at risk student applying for college. An extensive foundational (preparation) curriculum has been designed to strengthen students’ preparedness and awareness about college. ACTIVITIES: learning modalitiies assessment; highly effective teen workshop OBJECTIVE 2: INDIVIDUALIZED ASSESSMENT PORTFOLIOS Focused instruction for SAT testing tailored to meet students’individual needs. Instructors use test proven material and address students’ learning styles. ACTIVITIES: SAT workshop including practice tests; Best Practices workshop OBJECTIVE 3: STRUCTURING CURRCIULUM THAT EMPOWER STUDENTS Program includes music service learning opportunities that promotes responsibility and empowers adolescents to impact their community. Participants will be given the opportunity to complete an original composition which demonstrates an application of the knowledge attained over the course of the program. The composition will be performed by the student. If students choose not to perform their project must be described extensively in narrative format using the language of music theory, music history, and music productionThe goal of the project is to inspire creativity and empower students. ACTIVITIES: Music lessons and recording/producing workshop. OUTCOMES: Students will be accepted to a four year university.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Engaging the Reluctant Volunteer
Engaging the Reluctant Volunteer 8 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Our project will benefit L.A. by making helping easy, accessible and inclusive. More than that, by bringing people of different worlds together in the name of helping, and focusing on what we have it common, it will be clear what we can accomplish when we work together. Finally, by working to make events impactful, rewarding and fun, we will help build a culture of helping and civic engagement.</p> Along the way, we will fill food pantries, stock classrooms, tend gardens, fix buildings, raise money for worthy causes, and engage, empower, validate and bring together people of all ages, backgrounds and means throughout LA.</p> <p>We are reluctant to give numbers because then the tail can start wagging the dog. Of course, we understand that goals are important: so we can promise to next year give away 20,000 books or 25,000 pounds of food or 5000 bags of clothing; provide 2500 Christmas toys, or raise thousands of dollars to send kids to camp, fight cancer, or respond to a natural disaster. Host a community dinner for 200 every month, create an annual art show and pet adoption and concert. Hold beautification days at 50 different schools. Make large scale capital improvements at shelters, afterschool facilities, or homes for vets or seniors. Engage 50,000 people a year. All are doable, and we've done them and more.</p> <p>Here's the thing: Big Sunday is, perhaps, not the youngest or hippest organization out there. And, while we see how important it is to engage young people, we think people can still help after they're 34. Or 54. Or 94. Big Sunday is nothing if not inclusive, reaching out to and including people of all ages and backgrounds and at all socio-economic levels, letting them know that they're wanted and needed, getting them involved, and bringing them together with other good-hearted people.</p> <p>Full disclosure: We'd considered coming up with some very specific project for this proposal. But having been around for a number of years, we believe that there is no silver bullet. Change comes about through an ongoing, concerted effort. We are proud of the work we do and have done, and an opportunity like this would allow us to continue and expand it. When we started years ago, we said we wanted to be a group that brings people together to make the world a better place, not in response to a catastrophe, or because of a single compelling incident, but because it's the right thing to do. We like to think that we, through the ongoing generosity, goodwill, hard work, humor, dirty hands and big hearts of many, have accomplished that.</p> <p>Then again, by creating an easily navigated system to both meet and fulfill needs, and by helping to bring together our terrific brethren in L.A.'s helping world, we can greatly expand this culture of caring, concern and compassion, and engage even more people in the process of making life better and easier for all Angelenos.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Enhanced Permanent Supportive Housing for Victims of Domestic Violence
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Jenesse's own data and experience in this issue also found that affordable housing and insufficient resurces contributes to the chronic homeless problems of our clients. After completing our program, our clients are ready to live on their own providing a safe, nuturing home for themselves and their children. Nonetheless, being able to do so is not an easy task. Thie high cost of rent and poor credit scores often make it nearly impossible for them to attain adequate housing. Our data reports that , of clients who graduated from our transitional program, 30% had to move in with family, 37% moved to rental housing, 7% leave Jenesse and go to another transtional or homeless shelter, 6% move into Section 8 or other subsidized housing, 3% move to a psychiatric hospital, and 17% are unknown. According to the United Way, 70% of Angelenos cannot afford to purchase a home and renters spend disproportionately more for housing than homeowners. With a rapid increase in demand and a slow increase in supply, the United Way reports that both rental and home prices have skyrocketed over the past few years, with the majority of renters in SPA 6 having to use 50% or more of their income just to pay rent. Jenesse has been studying this problem for years and knows that women who exit our program need affordable, permanent housing. This is why Jenesse Center, Inc. plans to transform some of its transitional housing into affordable, low-income housing. The facilities will accommodate unserved and underserved members of SPA 6 including those who have not previously resided in a Jenesse facility, including emancipated youth. Jenesse will offer tenants self-contained an interactive facility that contains a classroom/computer lab, recreation room, and in-house store. All tenants will be mandated to follow a client responsibility standard that will be explained to them before they move in. Jenesse Center, Inc. intends to assist with meeting the housing needs of the 21st Century and to make sure that residents have the opportunity for safe, affordable housing that meets their ever-changing and ever-growing needs.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Only 10 percent of the individuals who join TFA report that teaching is one of their top career options. Yet 93 percent of our program’s alumni report they support TFA’s mission through career, philanthropy, volunteerism, or graduate study and 63 percent still work or study full-time in education. Our project will develop the next generation of city leaders in Los Angeles who are deeply committed to our students and a stronger education system.<BR> <BR> We have seen the benefits our corps members bring to their individual classrooms, to entire school buildings, and to school systems: <BR> <BR> <b>Teacher Leadership</b><BR> Los Angeles native Beatrice Viramontes (corps year ‘08) taught math and science at John Leichty Middle School just a few miles west of downtown. All of her Algebra students started the year at varying levels behind grade level. By the end of the year, 70 percent of her students were on or above grade level. Algebra is frequently referred to as a gatekeeper subject because it is the first in a series of higher-level math classes needed to succeed in college and life. Beatrice’s class was a stepping stone for even greater accomplishments; so far, her students have been accepted at Emerson College, Northwestern University, San Francisco State, and the University of California Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz and San Diego. Beatrice now coaches and supports groups of corps members working to help future college applicants make their dreams a reality. <BR> <b>School Leadership</b> <BR> Many of our alumni become principals to expand their impact from individual classrooms to entire school sites. Six of our 50 alumni school leaders are at the helm of California Distinguished Elementary Schools, including Frank Lozier (corps year ’00), the principal of Laurel Street Elementary in the Compton Unified School District. Laurel Street achieved a remarkable 927 Academic Performance Index (API) score last year. (API scores range from 200 to 1000, and the statewide target is 800.) <BR> <b>School System Leadership</b><BR> With more than two decades in Los Angeles, we also have 13 alumni impacting whole school systems, including: • Tommy Chang (corps year ’97), Superintendent of Intensive Support and Innovation, who oversees 130 schools and 130,000 students, including a majority of chronically failing schools in the LAUSD; • Gordon Gibbings (corps year ’99) and Chad Soleo (corps year ’01), both Cluster Directors overseeing groups of principals for Green Dot Public Schools; and • Angella Martinez (corps year ’01), Chief Academic Officer for KIPP LA schools. <BR> <BR> This spring, we will welcome the next group of new teachers, who we will train and support over the coming two years. These corps members may be the next Beatrice Viramontes, Frank Lozier or Tommy Chang, opening doors for thousands more Los Angeles students who deserve an excellent education.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
EnrichLA- A Garden in EVERY School!
EnrichLA- A Garden in EVERY School! 37 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will benefit Los Angeles by bringing edible gardens into schools. These gardens cheer up communities, improve campus morale, and act as outdoor classrooms. For many students, these school gardens are their only access to green, outdoor spaces in their neighborhood. By improving the environmental quality of their surroundings, children are more likely to succeed. We have seen first-hand how access to edible gardens can improve test scores and community involvement. Additionally, these gardens address the serious problem of obesity and obesity related diseases among our residents. According to the CDC, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 will contract diabetes in their lifetime. If that child is either Hispanic or Black, the odds of this happening is increased to 1 in 2. In response to the staggering childhood obesity statistics, the Center for Disease Control states that: "Schools play a particularly critical role by establishing a safe and supportive environment with policies and practices that support healthy behaviors. Schools also provide opportunities for students to learn about and practice healthy eating and physical activity behaviors" Our school gardens directly address this issue, not by forcing children to eat healthy food, but by encouraging them through access and education.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

We will build new companies, that create new jobs, thereby revitalizing downtown Los Angeles’ industrial core. Broadly, we will bring back the industrial core of downtown Los Angeles by rebuilding it into the cleantech innovation and commercialization center of the region. As a result, this area will once again provide family-supporting jobs for Boyle Heights, Lincoln Heights, East Los Angeles, Central and South Los Angeles, and beyond. In the next 4 years alone just one of the envisioned projects of the Roadmap – the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator’s La Kretz Innovation Campus—will generate over 1700 jobs from companies who pay $45M per year in salaries and wages and generate more than $85M per year in sales. We will create a new industrial powerhouse dedicated to clean technologies and sustainable jobs. We fully expect that by 2050, the LA Arts and Innovation District on the banks of the Los Angeles River will be the leading cleantech innovation and commercialization hub in the world.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Everything, Everywhere: LA 2050
Everything, Everywhere: LA 2050 8 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Everything, Everywhere will benefit Los Angeles by: • Creating replicable examples of community initiated and supported projects that inspire creativity, participation and experimentation citywide. • Cultivating, strengthening and maintaining Los Angeles’s high percentage of working artists and arts professionals. • Providing access and exposure to a diverse range of grassroots cultural production.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Eye to Eye LGBTQ Organizing Center
Eye to Eye LGBTQ Organizing Center
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project will provide a space for organizing, education, self-empowerment, community-building, and collection action among LA's community members, who are often under-represented in our city's circles of power. By institutionalizing programs for political education, leadership development and ongoing civic engagement, our project will amplify the voices and political power of LGBT people in communities of color, including and particularly women. In the course of a year, we expect to recruit and provide workshops or other opportunities to over 200 individuals, with the goal of sustaining the involvement of at least 30 who will invest in the ongoing development of the center. We will explore the possibility of establishing an independent center and community space. This work is currently led by our existing organization, staff and steering committee, and housed within a broader agency. Ultimately, we believe there is a need and a space for an autonomous space that can continue to evolve and a political organizing center. Los Angeles has a vibrant social justice movement and community of activists. Our goal is to increase the active involvement and influence of LGBTQ people of color and women in our community's collective efforts to improve the city. By organizing this community to address their lives at the intersections of race, gender and sexuality, we believe we can help organize a more inclusive and effective movement for change.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Fandango Obon Project / Proyecto Fandango Obon
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

While our neighborhoods in many ways provide comfortable, safe havens, and especially for immigrant populations, there should exist friendly avenues to enter and exit, and meaningful opportunities to engage across them. Great Leap continues its commitment to use the arts to bridge cultural boundaries. Over our 35 years we have developed methodologies to provide people of diverse ethnicities, religions and other self-identifications with opportunities for deep and meaningful encounters. Important elements of Fandango-Obon are providing a compelling purpose for people to come together, and the creation of an affirming space for exploration and expression without judgment. It is an entrance to a place in time where music, dance, and connection with one’s ancestral traditions can be lived with pride. Our theater techniques, games and other facilitation frameworks help participants bond with people of other backgrounds, often for the first time. Once such a “barrier” is unlocked, it can be more easily be opened in future encounters across the city. We practice assertive outreach to ensure that our gatherings are not only cross-cultural, but also intergenerational, so that young people can learn from elders who may have deeper understanding from direct experience with their cultural heritage. Geographical dimensions of L. A. will be utilized in unique ways. The L.A. River separates Boyle Heights and Little Tokyo. Though only a short walk across a bridge, residents of the respective neighborhoods generally do not interact, other than in passing. Fandango-Obon will give impetus to cross the “bridge” – on foot, bicycle or via the metro. A workshop at the Nishi Hongwanji Temple just west of the 1st St. Bridge, will welcome a mainly Latino community into a Japanese American setting. Conversely, residents of Little Tokyo will travel the short distance to Boyle Heights to be welcomed by our workshop partner Building Healthy Communities. Additional cross-cultural engagements include a workshop at A Place Called Home (APCH) in South Los Angeles, bringing Japanese Americans to a center with mainly African American and Latino youth. APCH is located only 3 miles south of Little Tokyo down Central Avenue, an historic cultural Mecca of its own. Fandango-Obon will elevate awareness of Angelenos’ common histories within geographic proximity. For example, how many of us knew that Boyle Heights has had established Japanese and Jewish communities in the recent past? Mutual understanding can lower cultural barriers and help us “create a circle dance” that respects our uniqueness while building trust and stronger community relations. We see the potential for this project to change stereotypical perceptions that separate us. As our city and nation continues moving toward people of color being the majority, we want L.A. to stand out as a place where arts and culture are robust and accessible to all and are used in innovative ways to meet our challenges.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Farm on Wheels
Farm on Wheels 15 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Farm on Wheels will benefit Los Angeles by creating new community hubs that provide Angelenos access to healthy, affordable food. Like farmers markets, each truck will serve as a place for people to have a more hands-on experience with food shopping. Many residents of our city are currently denied access to fresh produce despite living near some of the most productive and diverse farmlands in the world. A lack of capital, resources, and mobility have combined to create large areas of Los Angeles with few grocery stores and an excess of fast food chains. Farm on Wheels will provide healthy alternatives to the processed foods that dominate low-income areas and give more frequent access to farm fresh produce to those who can’t make it to their weekly farmers market. In the long term, this access will translate into better health outcomes for customers. Steady sources of fruits and vegetables will supplement diets dominated by unhealthy, processed foods. Substituting in these healthy alternatives will help in the fight against obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. We envision Farm on Wheels as a roaming community hub. Through affiliations with community gardens and local farmers, we will facilitate produce exchanges and the sale of low cost goods to encourage community agriculture. Another community benefit will be educational programming that teaches kids the benefits of healthy eating and localized agriculture. All of this activity at the cart will strengthen community bonds and provide new ways for people to connect with food.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Financial Enrichment and Management (collegiate class of 2018-2019)
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Statistics from the California High School Performance Reports presented by the State Department of Education indicate that only 63.5% of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) students graduate from high school. Those scoring above 50 percentile is even less. One area school, Fairfax High, has only a four-year competition rate of 42.3%. Without intervention, many of those students will drop out of school; many more will graduate without the necessary skills needed to succeed in life. Our classes will enable students to enter the workforce with more positive and realistic aspirations. Students statistically expected to underachieve will be empowered to do the opposite.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
First Star UCLA Bruin Guardian Scholars Academy
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will benefit Los Angeles by addressing the abysmal educational outcomes for the foster youth population of Los Angeles, the largest in the nation. Current outcomes for foster youth in Los Angeles are dismal. After leaving foster care, approximately 64 percent of young men experience incarceration , and approximately 60 percent of young women become pregnant by age 20 , and 24 percent of these young people will have experienced homelessness , creating a repetitive generational cycle of chaos, poverty and poor outcomes that are expensive in both human and fiscal terms. Of the approximately 5,200 youth who age out of foster care every year in California, the cost to the state, counties and cities is estimated to be over $165MM per year for those that are incarcerated, become homeless, and/or pregnant. See Appendix V. On average in Los Angeles County, only 50 percent of foster youth graduate from high school , far underperforming the average of 70 percent among youth not involved in the foster care system . Furthermore, only 3 percent graduate 2 or 4 year college , even though over 70 percent express a desire to participate in higher education. A study of dropouts by UCSB calculates that for each youth that drops out of high school in California, the economic loss over their lifetime is estimated to be $386,666 per youth.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Food Forward: Connecting Angelenos Through Local Food Abundance
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project will impact Los Angeles by actively engaging over five thousand residents (in 2013 alone) – of the most diverse backgrounds – in gleaning and recovery programs that build community, increase civic participation and renew the belief that we can all play a direct and vital role in reducing hunger among Los Angeles’ most vulnerable. As we continue to promote our mission and accomplishments, we believe we can educate thousands more residents about their important role as a human bridge that connects the abundance of Los Angeles’ untapped resources to those in need. The end goal of these efforts will be the distribution of several million servings of fresh fruits and vegetables to hunger relief agencies, which will directly benefit over 500,000 hungry and food insecure Angelenos annually. According to the LA 2050 report, high-poverty neighborhoods typically have less access to healthy food options and fresh fruits and vegetables, which negatively impacts the health of people living in those communities. Our work to distribute fresh produce offers a solution to the current crisis plaguing many of our low-resource communities. The produce Food Forward rescues is feeding a wide range of people in Los Angeles: 58% of the donated produce goes to Latino populations, 53% of it goes to women, 39% of it goes to children, and about 10% of it goes to elderly. This is critical work given the marked increase in hunger, homelessness and food insecurity documented by organizations such as the Study of Homelessness and Poverty at the Weingart Center, the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank. Food Forward is proud to offer community members a multitude of ways to become engaged. Our programs cover large portions of Los Angeles County – from Santa Monica to Covina and Claremont, from Hollywood to Woodland Hills, and from Pacoima to Downey and Torrance. Individuals of all ages, demographic and socioeconomic backgrounds, and physical abilities have the opportunity to volunteer time (at more than 50 food recovery events each month), offer their properties for harvest, or directly recover food themselves. Our website indicates which events have Pick Leaders fluent in Spanish, Portuguese, Mandarin, Korean or Vietnamese. These events not only engage volunteers in harvesting activity but also educate them on hunger, food waste and the untapped agricultural legacy of the Los Angeles region. We understand that the Los Angeles population is aging and we pride ourselves in offering various opportunities for aging and less able-bodied individuals. Additionally, we indicate which events are appropriate for families with small children. We also offer a number of events that are easily accessible by public transportation, which increases accessibility and volunteer diversity throughout all our programs.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Food Truck + Food Desert = Win Win Win!
Food Truck + Food Desert = Win Win Win! 69 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>There is no reason that the simple pleasures and benefits of fresh food that are enjoyed by citizens in Santa Monica can’t be found in any other corner of the city. Like a small house that is expanded room by room, until the wiring is a disastrous fire hazard, the LA sprawl has created pockets of neglect that leave citizens with unequal opportunity and weaker connections to the prosperity that the rest of Los Angeles enjoys.</p> <p>And childhood obesity is a problem that is having a tremendous impact on not only the state's physical health but also its financial health. According to a report by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy, California spends more than $21 billion in public and private money on healthcare and other costs because of obesity, which increases the risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and other diseases later in life. Access to better basic nutrition tends to prevent longer-term chronic diseases, adding a buffer against the ramifications of lack of insurance.</p> <p>The CC Food Desert Food Truck project will prove that it’s possible to bring affordable access to fresh, healthy foods into neighborhoods in South or Central Los Angeles through new approaches, while exploring ways that the trucks could deliver even more benefit. For example, a fleet of trucks could: create new jobs, provide education around eating habits and the causes of childhood diabetes and heart disease, offer new flavors and cuisines in areas where fast food is the only option, and create a sense of festivity with a regular schedule, building more social cohesion into neighborhoods. </p> <p>But this is just the beginning. Los Angeles could fast be positioned as a leading innovator in food security issues, by taking this rapid iteration approach in the context of public/private partnership – testing everything from multi-use trucks (meals combined with basic health monitoring from time-to-time) to franchises for anyone interested in starting a new business. The point is to START! We can’t wait for more task force reports or think tank strategies. Involving residents in creating the city in which they want to thrive would be a success in itself. We give power back to the people, while we facilitate a vision for a healthier Los Angeles.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Found LA: Festival of Neighborhoods will benefit Los Angeles by offering Angelenos the opportunity to discover and re-discover their city through authentic connections with neighborhoods, their residents, and cultural treasures. At last year’s festival, Jamie Kim led a group on a tour of the Kwanumsa Buddhist Temple in Koreatown. She said, “It was a fantastic opportunity for the temple to open its doors to a non-Korean speaking audience. It's when people come together that ideas become real and understanding deepens. That's very magical and I see that as one of the most important aspect of these neighborhood tours. So many people from the temple came up to me to tell me how happy and proud they were of the tour!” Angelenos can participate as volunteers and/or as tour goers. Volunteers will be recruited to lead, organize and support tours. A planning committee made up of individuals from across the city will work together to plan and promote the event beginning in May 2013. Funding from LA 2050 can support an enhanced marketing and public relations campaign to share the event and its benefits with a wide audience. The campaign would allow time for building interest in the festival through promotional materials (videos, print materials, etc.) highlighting the benefits of Angelenos engaging more deeply with their city. A strong focus will be on the food component of the Festival. Images and anecdotes of dishes, restaurants, and chefs (amateur and professional) will be used in the promotional materials. Volunteers from each participating neighborhood will be engaged to create buzz among their social networks – online and offline. All of these levels of participation will support to the goal of social connectedness.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This past year, LAUSD shortened the academic school year, laid off hundreds of qualified teachers, cut almost all after-school, art and music programs, and reduced funding dramatically. Ironically, students have then been asked to perform higher on California Standardized Tests. Our Dreamers already contend with substandard living, nutrition, and educational facilities. IHADLA aims to fill these gaps and beyond with the understanding that a better life for these children means a better life for all of us. IHADLA specifically chooses different program sites throughout Los Angeles so that we make the most impact possible across the county. By providing the children with the greatest needs with IHADLA’s “whole-life” programming, we are dramatically increasing their opportunity to succeed. Higher graduation rates, and healthier lifestyles, mean that they are less likely to rely upon the public welfare system and also less likely to cause crime, which leads to a decreased burden on the prison system in California. High school dropouts are four times more likely to be unemployed as those who have a college degree, and are more likely to require federal assistance. They are also more likely to be delinquents, as eighty-two percent of prisoners in America are dropouts. Most of all, by supporting IHADLA, Angelenos are making an investment in the future of our city. The future innovators of science, technology, social science, etc. are standing before us at 99th Street Elementary School in Watts. They have extraordinary potential. However, most of their parents never finished high school, and even fewer still know what it’s like to earn above the poverty line. Who, if not IHADLA, will lead these children towards towards their dreams? To turn our backs on them would be to turn our backs on our own community, and our economy, and all of our futures.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Front Line Leaders Academy: Creating  Change that Lasts
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles’ population is aging but has historically been relatively youthful in comparison to the rest of the country. Research by CIRCLE, a leader on youth civic education and engagement, shows that “low levels of conventional measures of civic engagement among non-college youth translate into inequalities in political and civic participation by race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and geography.” The LA-based Front Line Leaders Academy we are proposing will empower a new, emerging generation of Angelenos to connect with their communities and work on their own campaign book, which addresses a problem or issue in Los Angeles; engages the greater Los Angeles community; cultivates a progressive community; and builds emerging activists into life-long contributors to Los Angeles. Through this project Los Angeles will be infused with diverse, young civic participants who bring new and innovative ideas and are active in determining the policies, practices, and institutions by which they will seek community improvement that will create opportunities which ensure that youth remain in and contribute to the Los Angeles community over the long-term.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Fuel LA's Creative Economy, Help UNIQUE LA Build The Creative Lab!
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Unique Creative Lab will directly impact Los Angeles is multiple ways and will benefit, and further fuel all sectors of the growing creative economy: 1) By directly increasing the amount of small business owners and entrepreneurs in the LA region. 2) By providing applicable resources for individuals, groups, organizations and communities to see their ideas to fruition. 3) By creating a diverse center of collaboration that reflects on and includes all demographics necessary in accomplishing a more creative and sustainable LA. 4) By providing curated programing to the public that will generate valuable and innovative discussion at a grassroots level. 5) By providing a co-work space available to creative professionals from across the US and the world, as allowing them to participate in the mission and goals of the Unique Creative Lab. 6) By bringing national awareness and media attention to our community and the joint mission of LA2050 and the Unique Creative Lab. 7) By becoming a successful and inspirational model of action for other communities and cities to follow.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Future Leaders Initiative - Listen to the Leaders of Tomorrow.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Future Leaders Initiative has both an immediate and long-term impact in Los Angeles. The 100 individuals initially involved in the program will feel an immediate social connectedness to each other and their community. This inter-generational relationship building will make a powerful impact across generations. The mentorship relationship provides professionals with an important volunteer opportunity that has an effect long after the mentorship is over. The student finds an adult ally that actually listens and cares about what they have to say and contribute. To give voice is to give a stake in the public discourse, and that is what the Future Leaders Initiative strives to do. As adult stakeholders, participating professionals may be inspired to volunteer more or become more involved in local government. As young stakeholders, students will become more civic-minded, attend more volunteer events and be motivated to simply vote in order to get their voice heard. And with involvement of many community partners throughout the process, we are breathing new life into a city where people care, citizens care, and neighbors talk to each other. In the long-term, the same students who were active in the program may be the next business executives, city councilmembers or nonprofit leaders of 2050. They already have experience in collaborating and communicating with one another due to their work within the Future Leaders Initiative so the social connectedness is already present. These are the individuals that others follow. If they set a good example and affect change in their social spheres, a domino effect of social awareness, civic engagement, and increased volunteerism among Los Angelenos city-wide is possible. We are simply asking for adults to listen and for the youth to take action.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
GLOBALGIRL MEDIA HIVE NETWORK 8 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Anyone who lives in Los Angeles is aware of the glaring disparities between wealth, education and access, and how these schisms play out in the media. Girls in our target communities are grappling with a 45% high school dropout rate, gang and drug violence, high rates of teen pregnancy, and the overall challenges of growing up with limited resources. It doesn't help when they are also bombarded with highly sensationalistic reporting and negative stereotypes in film, television and music videos, rather than providing positive images and role-models. Being able to tell one’s own story and believe in one’s own voice is the beginning of being able to advocate for all forms of social justice. GGM believes its model of interactive, peer-based media training through which young women seek to exert both voice and influence on issues of public concern can lead to real systemic change. Our training provides a fun, connected, and personalized education experience that recognizes girls’ strengths in technology and media, areas where they don’t necessarily gravitate. This in turn helps them stay focused, stay in school, develop and demonstrate skills and abilities for jobs and economic development. The potential of increasing access for women and girls to new media technology is exponential. Once one young woman experiences the transformative benefits of the program, she often becomes a “transmitter” introducing others in her community to her ideas and work, creating a ripple effect of change. Girls who are feeling disconnected can start to feel “connected” throughout our hive network, seeking out mentors, apprenticeships and other GlobalGirls from across L.A. and other countries. What we are really doing is advocating for a girl-driven global “digital citizenship,” where girls harness social media for social change, sharing and transferring their new knowledge with other girls who interact internationally on our website, games, apps and blogs, who in turn build on that knowledge and remix it for their own needs, then pay it forward by sharing/resharing that knowledge. In contrast to our target area’s dropout rate, GGM graduates have a 100% high school enrollment/graduation rate and a 90% college enrollment rate. Further, 69% have continued to report for the L.A. bureau beyond their initial training. Girls who have taken our training talk about the power of connectivity, authorship and how making their own media gives them confidence to build brighter futures. In a recent Ted Talk, GlobalGirl Rocio Ortega said this: “GlobalGirl Media taught me for the first time the value of my own voice, I worked with Tebogo form South Africa, and although we have similar dreams and ambitions, we learn from our different experiences…I thought I was alone in my struggle with my father and my culture. My opportunity with GGM has helped me to speak my mind and express my ideas-- we’ve not only become global sisters, but advocates for change in our community…”

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Gardens, Gardens - Everywhere!
Gardens, Gardens - Everywhere! 5 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The building of neighborhood gardens in the vastness of Los Angeles will help the city in many ways. We have learned over the last ten years that a garden that is shared by community and students builds a strong support system. It beautifies the city, creating green lush food and flower gardens, adding trees and community gathering areas. Growing and eating locally helps the ecology, reduces the carbon footprint, reduces excess trash, and creates healthier individuals. Most importantly, it creates community; a garden has no limits as to age, race, gender, creed, culture or color, or economic status. A garden brings together people at an equal level to work together and develop trust and support. It reconnects people to each other, making our city rich in positive relationships working toward the good of the community, not just the individual. It will bring educational opportunities to schools , churches and neighborhoods. Each garden will exemplify the culture of the community around it and the network of gardens will share knowledge across the city to each other.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Grades of Green - Los Angeles Youth Corps
Grades of Green - Los Angeles Youth Corps
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Grades of Green’s LAYC will benefit Los Angeles in several important ways. </p> <p>First and foremost, each participating school and school community will receive direct environmental benefit from that school’s Green Project, be it a Walk to School Wednesday or Trash-Free Tuesday Lunch Campaign, an e-Waste Collection, a Campus-Wide Detox, a Compost System Implementation, a clean up of a local park or beach or whatever Green Project the team chooses to implement. Results of the Green Projects will range from fewer carbon emissions, less trash sent to local landfills, proper disposal of electronic materials, the elimination of toxic chemicals on campus and so on. </p> <p>Additionally, each of the 10 participating schools will become a “Grades of Green School” with access to over 40 free, fun and hands-on environmental education tools and activities they can continue to implement on campus for the years to come. The schools can build on their experience and success and take on additional green activities as they are ready. Statistics indicate, and our experience confirms, that when schools implement programs like the ones we have detailed on our website, the schools typically save money, test scores go up and students learn valuable lessons about the power their individual actions can have in helping to protect the environment. </p> <p>Moreover, we have found that by educating and inspiring our kids to care for and protect the environment, we are raising environmental awareness in our communities through a “trickle up” approach. That is, when students learn, for example, about the “4Rs” – reduce, reuse, recycle and rot (composting) – they often go home and ask their parents to help them pack trash free lunches or set up recycle and/or composting systems at home. Students also take these ideas to their teachers and administrators and ask for their help making their schools cleaner and greener. We have even seen students empowered by our education programs petition their local governments for environmental measures. In Manhattan Beach, for example, Grades of Green kids were the impetus behind the City banning the use of plastic bags. Hermosa Beach students were credited with convincing their City Council to ban the use of Styrofoam containers in local restaurants. The LAYC will inspire and empower students to care for and protect the environment; those students, in turn, will inspire and empower their broader school community, including their parents, educators, community leaders and businesspeople to care for and protect the environment. This ripple effect will benefit the entire city of Los Angeles. </p> <p>Finally, and most importantly, we are shaping the minds and habits of Los Angeles’ next generation of leaders, teachers, voters, executives and parents – the people who can make a difference in what Los Angeles looks like in 2050. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Green Jobs in a Zero Waste LA
Green Jobs in a Zero Waste LA 9 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>The exclusive franchise that meets our zero waste goals (all waste recycled, composted or otherwise processed) will create over 2,800 new jobs even while 80% of recycling is exported. With robust new infrastructure for recycling and remanufacturing that ends export of recycables, an additional 11,500 jobs can be added, building to nearly 50,000 jobs in these industries in LA by 2050. </p> <p>While this project can be a huge generator of jobs, if the region does not develop new recycling infrastructure, recycling/remanufacturing will continue to be exported overseas. Absent this change, within the next decade, an estimated 11,500 new manufacturing jobs will be lost— and we estimate that every job sent overseas could mean seven jobs in our region. For example, upon implementation of the exclusive franchise, if plastics and compost infrastructure is developed, it will immediately create 6,000 jobs that would otherwise go out of the country.</p> LAANE, Isidore and our other partners in this work will ensure that the jobs created in waste hauling, diversion and remanufacture pay family supporting wages, offer health care and are safe and green.</p> <p>E-waste is one of the most promising areas for job creation in recycling. Now, over 200,000 tons of e-waste end up in landfills annually, though it is toxic and illegal. The benefits of the proper stewardship of e-waste are considerable. Electronics can be de-manufactured for valuable materials such as titanium and platinum. Handled correctly, these increasingly rare commodities, along with other materials, can be remanufactured to benefit LA workers, industry and the community. </p> <p>LA will benefit from incubating manufacturing businesses that make new products out of high-volume recycled materials like compostable organics and plastics as the demand for high-quality compost from farmers and recycled plastic goods for remanufacture increases. The demand from residents and businesses that prefer products made of recycled materials will boost the economy. </p> <p>At the core of the issue is making sure we have high-quality materials for businesses that need them the most: processors and remanufacturers. By keeping a "closed-loop" on recycling, we ensure that we have more materials in the recycling stream, we can attract and incubate entire recycling supply chains, and we are able to create more jobs. Part of our research will include exploring promising new policy strategies including government procurement policies and tax incentives as a means of encouraging the expansion of this industry – one that already has created 128,000 jobs in California.</p> <p>The implementation of the exclusive franchise will not only lead to new job creation and the uplift of existing jobs, the project will include significant environmental benefits leading to a zero waste city, cleaner air due to newly required clean-fuel trucks, and streets that are safer and relieved of nuisance.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Greening 7th St. in Skid Row/DTLA
Greening 7th St. in Skid Row/DTLA 7 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

As the re-purposing of downtown Los Angeles continues apace, an eclectic mix of urban functions is taking root including commercial, residential, recreational, and social. The industrial district or Skid Row section of downtown currently hosts functions as diverse as wholesaling, retailing, warehousing, nightlife, housing as well as an array of social services. But in many of these areas there has been a lag in commensurate infrastructure development (which stands in stark contrast to other downtown districts which have experienced significant attention and investment in recent years). While this lag is evident on many levels, one in particular stands out: greening. As the industrial district/Skid Row area increasingly accommodates a diverse set of activities, in many cases it continues to exude a grim sun-bleached austerity more in keeping with it's original single purpose function. Our project of greening 7th St. in downtown's under-served industrial area will not only improve community aesthetics but contribute to sustainability by addressing the urban heat island dynamic as well as improving the health and well being of it's growing population of residents and employees.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
HYPO-PARK
HYPO-PARK 9 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

</p>The Hypo-Park will benefit L.A. by:<p> </p>1. Providing a more efficient and effective use of taxpayer dollars to create higher quality recreational facilities, on a greater range of available lots.<p> </p>2. Providing recreational opportunities that allow for the kind of active, challenging and fun uses that attract children--and burn calories--than the generally more passive, leisure-orientation of existing park space. Intensively programmed, yet small enough in size to make easier to acquire, it is aimed at directly addressing childhood obesity, which has been shown to be linked to a lack of per capita open space in Los Angeles, particularly in economically depressed and/or higher density areas.<p> </p>3. Engendering a stronger sense of community cohesion by acting as a kind of social activity hub that is centered upon health, yet offers an assortment of complementary and supporting uses that make it as convenient as the service stations it replaces.<p> </p>4. Taking advantage of the soon-to-be disappearing corner gas station (post-oil) by supplanting it with a better, cleaner and healthier use: a new type of "body shop".<p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Harmony Project
Harmony Project 30 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Harmony Project exists to serve low-income families, for whom the program is provided at no cost. Harmony Project founder, Dr. Margaret Martin, saw how music can shape intellectual development in underserved children and bring hope and greater well-being to families facing substantial challenges. With rare exception, we accept only those families whose income is below 185% of federal poverty level (this corresponds to the eligibility criteria for the Los Angeles Unified School District’s free/reduced lunch program). The neighborhoods we serve must have at least 50% of students eligible for the lunch program. Currently, students’ age range is from 6-18, with an average age of 11; 59% are female and 41% are male. The demographics of the 1,659 unduplicated youth we serve are: 70% Latino, 10% African-American, 10% Asian/Pacific Islander, 2% White, and 8% Mixed/Other/ Unknown. By virtue of their poverty and the neighborhoods in which they live, Harmony Project’s target population is at risk for juvenile involvement in gangs, drug and alcohol abuse, aggression, school drop-out, teenage pregnancy and parenting, depression, and suicide. Most of our programs are located within Los Angeles’ twelve Gang Reduction & Youth Development Zones designated by the Mayor’s Office, neighborhoods up to four square miles in area where documented rates of violent gang crime are 400% greater than elsewhere in the city. The study and practice of music provides a wide range of benefits in terms of cognitive and social development (e.g., improved academic performance, self-esteem, behavior). With cutbacks in public education, no music program in Los Angeles is providing the type of program that can deliver these benefits. The RAND Corporation’s 2004 report entitled, Gifts of the Muse: Reframing the Debate About the Benefits of Arts, highlights that “the most important benefits require sustained involvement in the arts.” Even with the many arts organizations in the city, no other commits to students for their entire childhood, providing a hands-on, year-round program with high expectations, and other program elements research has shown to be effective in fostering positive changes in participants. Harmony Project is providing services to communities that otherwise remain isolated and invisible. The students and families participating in Harmony Project today are the future of Los Angeles. We are creating the next generation of community members who will be educated, productive members of society and who will be eager to seek out, support, promote and participate in a Los Angeles rich in culture and music. These participants who graduate today will come back to invest, teach, and support social programs that will benefit new generations to come.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Heal This City
Heal This City
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>EDUCATION: With the momentum we've experienced this past year as part of developing the program and curriculum for Westchester Enriched Sciences Magnets High School, there's no question that teachers and principles recognize the value of Lab-type greenhouse farming as opposed to traditional raised-bed farming. It's hard to overstate the value of this to high-school education. Teaching seed propagation, benefits of a varied crop mix to high-school students markedly improves test scores. (See studies uploaded, below)</p> <p>ENVIRONMENT: With increasing climate change, extended droughts are continuing, further limiting food production in the Central Valley and farming communities on the outskirts of Los Angeles. Bottom line, food prices are projected to spike sooner, not later. It is crucial to begin transitioning from wasteful and ecologically damaging farming practices that yield 4-6 harvests per year to intensive, high-production circulating-water farm methods that use 5% of water used in conventional agribusiness. Energy prices are also trending upward and this, too, affects cost and availability of foods. Without question, this project is tied to Los Angeles' economic viability as an agriculture industry state. With farm production shrinking in the Central Valley each year, Los Angeles could step into position as a high-volume producer of fresh foods and vegetables, improving the likelihood that agriculture will continue to be a strong element of the local and state economy.</p> <p>The food desert issues and homeless problems in in Los Angeles are also at a critical juncture. There is no doubt that a vibrant urban agriculture economy will make a huge difference to Los Angeles' ability to maintain law and order, should production in distant rural settings undergo continued shrinkage as a result of changing climate, drought, rising energy prices and the need to scale back carbon emissions that trucking foods from farms to urban centers causes.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Heal the Bay's Healthy Neighborhoods, Healthy Environment Initiative
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our Healthy Neighborhoods, Healthy Environment Initiative’s Environmental Corps campaign will benefit our fellow Angelenos by creating an entire community of educated and empowered individuals working to increase the amount of safe, clean, and healthy open space in the region, while also benefiting local waters and watersheds. We will work throughout the targeted district from kindergarten through high school, as well as working with parents and district staff, to ensure that they are all receiving consistent message points. Most people are unaware of how they impact the environment both in negative and positive ways. Our programs will increase understanding of basic scientific concepts as they relate to the environment, issues of pollution, and methods of conservation and stewardship. We will then take it a step further and work with the community and implement effective strategies of conservation such as community and school cleanups; creating learning gardens on campuses that increase permeable space; and provide students with easy access to green space, organizing campus recycling programs. Additionally, we will work with the communities to empower them to take on projects that they are passionate about as they relate to creating a healthier environment, providing access to experts, funds and volunteers to implement these projects. Our Speakers Bureau program is the easiest access point into our programs, providing information and conservation strategies to students and adults of all ages through assemblies at the schools. Elementary and middle school students will benefit from the Youth Environmental Education Program at Heal the Bay’s Santa Monica Pier Aquarium (SMPA), which provides hands-on, standards-based classroom field and lab-based programs. We will target elementary school students through our Aqua Explorers program (a multi-class lesson for 3rd/4th graders in partnership with LA Neighborhood Land Trust, Children’s Nature Institute and reDiscover; Lunch n’ Learn (a combination classroom presentation with an educational beach field trip); and Coastal Cleanup Education Day (which takes 2nd-5th graders through an intense day of exploration, education, and stewardship at the beach). We will target 8th grade students with the Story of Water 4-week program, leading to a school-wide behavioral change project. Creek 101 will work with 6th-12th grade students in a 3-part class and field based education and stewardship program. Youth/Teacher Summits will provide in-depth focused training to students and adults throughout the district. Our new Digi-Green program will use social media and digital technologies to share ideas, experiences, and generate civic engagement and stewardship opportunities to all ages.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Helping Small Businesses and Independent Contractors in Los Angeles Be Very Nice.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

My project will benefit Los Angeles in numerous ways. First, the toolkit will serve as a great resource for entrepreneurs in Los Angeles by giving them the tools and confidence necessary to excel in business and in philanthropy (at the same time). Second, the toolkit will plant the seed for potentially thousands of new businesses in LA, all of which will be actively giving back to their respective communities and the world at large. It is a win-win for Los Angeles and the world in which it resides as well as the people and businesses within LA. If this grant is received, I will personally provide up to 5 hours of free consultation on best practices for integrating our model to the first 100 Angelenos that obtain a copy. That is 500 hours of service that I am willing to give to the people of LA, a value of $100,000.00 which is the exact dollar amount of this grant. It all comes back around :)

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
High School Students Shape the Future of Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will benefit Los Angeles in a variety of ways. • CityLife students-as-adults will know how to access “City Hall” and the planning process in order to provide input into the urban planning process. • Because CityLife students will understand the importance of the arts and their role in building and maintaining strong communities, they will support and protect various arts projects in their communities as well as throughout the city. • CityLife students will “spread the word,” reaching out to and working with students in neighboring communities. • CityLife students will become well educated citizens of the future, which according to the LA2050 Report, is the first step toward improving the City. • CityLife students will learn about a whole range of career possibilities in urban planning, politics and government, and related fields such as urban planning, architecture, law (land use…), environmental engineering, the arts and more. • Perhaps some CityLife students-as-adults will run for office and become public servants. • CityLife students will help improve the quality of their neighborhoods and communities through bottom-up rather than top-down policies, planning and activities. Each time one neighborhood improves, it has a positive impact on the surrounding neighborhoods. • CityLife projects and murals will bring information, interaction, beauty, whimsy and art to the community. • CityLife alums will model their varied and innovative ways of seeing, thinking and acting.

See Idea Details
remind me
Challenge Winner!
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

With more than 1,000 gangs and an estimated 100,000 gang members, Los Angeles County is the gang capital of the world. The City of Los Angeles is spotted with large areas of concentrated poverty where many of these gangs operate and where crime levels are higher than the city-wide average. Many of the clients we serve at Homeboy Industries live in neighborhoods where elevated levels of poverty and violence negatively impact public safety, public health, and perceptions of human vulnerability.<br> <br> Providing our clients with productive alternatives to involvement in gangs can dramatically improve their safety and the overall wellbeing of their families and communities. Because of the transformative power education has on healing and public safety, Homeboy Industries Education and Curriculum Department adapts traditional and alternative learning strategies to better serve men and women whose lives and communities have been impacted by poverty, violence, incarceration, and separation from their families. We provide hope through education and co-create a solid foundation based on kinship and reciprocation. By using these strategies and imbuing our clients with hope, rather than despair, we help them make safer decisions, lead healthier lives, and become assets to the safety of their communities.<br> <br> This curriculum is integrated with Homeboy Industries’ comprehensive model of gang intervention services, and impacts several of the other indicators in the LA2050 challenge.<br> • Education: The classes we offer also help improve the educational attainment of our clients. Many who come to us without high school diplomas earn a degree or a GED with our help. Homeboy Industries also partners with Learning Works Charter High School to provide gang-impacted youth with a supportive environment in which to earn high school diplomas.<br> • Income and Employment: We provide on-the-job training to 300 people each year. Through this training, men and women who had little work experience and few job skills are able to receive training, achieve industry-recognized credentials, build resume-writing and interviewing skills, and receive support in finding jobs outside of Homeboy Industries.<br> • Health: Homeboy Industries provides free basic medical services for clients and community members, and helps them get enrolled in health insurance plans. We also provide free mental health, substance abuse and psychiatric counseling.<br> • Environmental Quality: Among our most successful programs is the Solar Panel Installation Training & Certification Program. Through this program, community clients receive a state- and nationally-recognized certification in a growing field that has the potential to improve the health and well-being of the city and their own communities.<br> <br> In everything we do, Homeboy Industries connects people to one another and works collectively to transform individual lives, families, and the city we call home.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Human Resources L.A. Artist Residency Program!
Human Resources L.A. Artist Residency Program! 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

While Los Angels is designated a thriving global art market it is now just approaching designation as a global arts city. Recently initiated endeavors including PST 2012, the first L.A. Biennial at Hammer Museum and upcoming PST 2017 are placing Los Angeles as a powerful center for culture and the arts on the international stage. A artist residency, which surprisingly Los Angeles does not yet have, would act as an important platform to support generation of high caliber artist works, discourse and exchange. This residency could grow to support a cross section of arts institutions within Los Angeles and artists working within them through concerted participation. Through our participation with 18th Street Arts Center in Santa Monica, Southern California’s largest artist residency program, we would hope to create public art works that tie together the larger geographical landscape of Los Angeles. In December 2015 the L.A. City Metro is scheduled to open it’s Bergamont Station and 17th Street Stations completing a long awaited thoroughfare connecting central Los Angeles to the west side. 18th Street is an early partner with Metro to select public arts commissions designated for these new transit sites. Meanwhile, HRLA is only blocks away form the existing Chinatown station. Both institutions would like to partner to implement a public arts program in collaborated effort with Metro in the future. Our focus would be to engage the ridership of Metro and support artists’ projects that address the unique geographical web that is Los Angeles. These geographical bridges would parallel generational bridges and serve to elaborate upon the rich history of 18th Street Arts Center and it’s support of an older generation of west side artists by creating platforms for exchange between the two residencies. Both 18th Street and HRLA have existing exhibition venues and publication presidents that can support the public extension of work produced from these exchanges. The core immediate audience and community for Human Resources are artists and art appreciators living on the east side of Los Angeles. This community is diverse in terms of age, race, gender and socio-economic status with community members ranging from the early-20s to their mid-60s. The Artist residency program would allow us to continue to grow this community and extend it further out into the public sphere.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Igniting Imaginations Today, Ensuring Arts Vitality Tomorrow
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

We believe the arts are essential to creative thinking and participation in the arts plays an important role in the development of our children. Thought leaders in education and government officials agree. Today’s educators, politicians and business leaders spend a great deal of time and resources discussing the pressing need for a trained future workforce in the fields of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in order for the country to remain competitive in tomorrow’s economy. However, many astute leaders know that a letter is missing in this equation, the letter A (Art and Design), to spell STEAM. The arts are the lynchpin to success in building the workforce of 2050 simply because through the arts, students learn creative problem solving, effective communication, innovative thinking and the ability to navigate complex situations. They become better citizens and professionals across all fields and industries, as well as more thoughtful contributors to society, because they are able to more effectively express themselves and think creatively. As the former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, Rocco Landesman said at the Arts Education Partnership National Forum in April 2010, “The arts provide us with new ways of thinking, new ways to draw connections…and they help maintain our competitive edge by engendering innovation and creativity.” United States Education Secretary Arne Duncan also added, “The arts can no longer be treated as a frill… arts education is essential to stimulating the creativity and innovation that will prove critical to young Americans competing in a global economy.” In the midst of arts funding cuts in public schools, the Levitt program offers a meaningful solution. All Levitt programming is free of charge and family friendly. We create value across the board because our Los Angeles and Pasadena venues are accessible, conveniently located near public transit, and available to all who wish to participate. By offering first-hand involvement in the arts, Levitt’s program will help build the Los Angeles leaders of tomorrow by providing rich arts learning experiences, and in turn helping to build a better Los Angeles for the next generation. While the Levitt program is nationwide, two of our six pavilions are located in Los Angeles County – Pasadena (Memorial Park) and Los Angeles (MacArthur Park). A total of 100+ concerts are presented from mid-June to the end of August each year in the greater Los Angeles area – free of charge. The wildly popular children’s programs reach tens of thousands each season, and many families attend these concerts on a regular and often weekly basis. By adding an educational and interactive component to the children’s programming, we will have the ability to engage more youth in Levitt’s work and have them leave the concerts with not only a memory of the interactive activities and concert but also possess an increased appreciation for the arts.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Improve The Quality of Life Through Education and Community Support
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

OUR PROGRAMS BRIGHT FUTURES SCHOLARS LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM The Program extends itself to all targeted high achieving (3.0 GPA) students, including low-income students completing high school against insurmountable odds. The goal is to provide these young people with the tools necessary to quest for success. A vital component in this program provides "group mentoring" as well as "individual mentoring"from our communities finest. Committed mentors include congressman, senators, assembly members, mayors, county supervisors, physicians, clergy, corporate CEO's, attorneys, scientists, engineers, artists, educators, law enforcement officials, managers and administrators. Bright Futures Scholars participate as Junior Council Persons (representing their mentors and schools all over the nation). Monthly Scholars television tapings are aired on Public Access Television, and can also be viewed online all around the world. HEALTHY, WEALTHY & WISE A multi-cultural health program geared to youth (of all ages) and families. The program further extends itself to addressing health issues and concerns of at-risk and low-income youth and families. Health education, at all levels, is provided to assist in maintaining healthy living and positive life choices. SMOOTHING THE ROUGH EDGES "UNVEILING THE JEWELS WITHIN" A pre-training, pre-screening program designed to target individuals' ages 14-25 that need assistance in polishing &nbsp;employment,, personal adjustment, professional and marketability skills. Participants are prepared to be competitive in corporate America. STARS FOR STRIKES A second chance program that allows juvenile first offenders an opportunity to turn their lives around. Juveniles, referred into the program from the Juvenile Justice System are given an opportunity to redeem themselves, build self-esteem, and develop character while learning to make positive life choices. ART FROM THE HEART A program in which children are able to express them selves through their passions in art be in visual arts or audible. Through painting, photography, or other visual arts or through the audible art of playing an instrument the children learn to release their emotions in a safe and productive format.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Increase Voter Turnout, Neighbor to Neighbor Communication and Gov't Responsiveness
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>First, citizens will have a useful tool through which they can communicate easily & clearly with their neighbors, & understand one another’s concerns, eliminating some of the disconnectedness that can characterize city life in LA. While online social media exist, as do online petition tools, the key to this project is combining the tools & organizing them to focus on a specific public goal in order to make use of their potential for improving quality of life & for creating a sense of community.</p> <p>The current system of Neighborhood Councils in the city is a great idea and plays a vital role, but is not always easy for all citizens to access since meetings are held at specific times & places when not everyone is available. Using the online tools improves accessibility.</p> <p>Secondly, city officials will have access to a means for understanding public concerns and ideas & will be able to improve responsiveness.</p> <p>Third, voter turnout will increase. City residents will have a stake in the local elections since they can play a role in bringing issues to the ballot or informing candidate positions.</p> <p>Fourth, as residents know their voices are being heard, & are able to witness their own impact, barriers to collective action will be reduced and other civic benefits will accrue such as increased levels of volunteerism and community participation.</p> Finally, public policy will be improved in the sense that it will be more responsive to public needs.Only time will tell what specific policy initiatives and legislation will ensue to improve the lives of Angelenos, but a historical example provides an illustration of the power of public communication.</p> <p>Forty years ago residents in an area of Niagara Falls, NY, experienced higher-than-normal rates of miscarriages, birth defects, cancer, and other illnesses. Families suffered in silence, their struggles known only to their physicians and to close family or friends. When one family mom told a town meeting of her concerns about the environment near her home, other families chimed in with similar stories of illnesses. As they shared, they realized they were not alone, & that the high incidence in their neighborhood of sickness could not be a coincidence, but must point to a larger problem. The neighborhood came to be known to the nation as Love Canal and before they were finished, a committed group of housewives gained national attention for their concerns and forced into being some of the most important environmental-protection legislation of the 20th Century. And it only happened once neighbors began to communicate & discover they were not the only ones with a particular set of concerns or experiences. If they had not talked to & heard one another, they might have simply continued to suffer in silence. In today's “town square,” the Internet, citizens can share, ideas, voice concerns, better understand one another, & ultimately organize for action outside of the town square.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Increasing Capacity for College Going
Increasing Capacity for College Going 6 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will help improve the college-going rates at high schools that have the lowest college-going rates within the Los Angeles Unified School District. Many students who are eligible for college choose not to attend college because they receive little support on how to navigate the college-going process or lack the information on how to apply. By pairing mentors with high school seniors who are college-eligible, they can successfully guide them through the college application process. The high school graduation rate in California ranks in the bottom half of all U.S. states, with the Los Angeles Unified School District’s own graduation rate well below the state’s, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Budget cuts have severely affected the amount of college counselors at the schools. A shortage of counselors limits the support that students receive regarding the college application process. Traditionally, California students' access to counselors varies by grade level, and 29 percent of California school districts have no counseling programs at all. The ratio of students per counselor in California averages 945 to 1, compared to the national average of 477 to 1, ranking California last in the nation. In Los Angeles, the average ratio is 800 students to 1 guidance counselor. Many under-resourced schools have guidance counselors, but not dedicated college counselors. Students attending private schools and public schools in affluent parts of the city are afforded very different access to college information and support, often supplemented by parents employing private college counselors to shepherd their children through the complexity of college applications. Thus the gap between those who have access to resources and those who don’t remains stark; the implications for college graduation rates and lifetime earning potential are obvious. By having volunteers serve as mentors, they can alleviate the burden of college counselors having to work with enormous case loads and students can have the one on one interaction needed to understand how to navigate the college admissions and financial aid processes.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Innovation Saturday for Los Angeles Youth
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

There is an exciting groundswell of entrepreneurship and innovation in Los Angeles that must be extended to our city’s low income youth. Youth in Los Angeles who live in under-resourced neighborhoods suffer at the crossroads of two major crises affecting our city: the education crisis and the economic crisis. These crises disproportionately affect our city's African-American and Latino communities, who bear the burden of struggling schools and a depressed local economy, where better paying employment is difficult to find. When a segment of our population is cut off from full participation in the economy, the broader community suffers. A youth innovation conference specifically targeting our low-income youth works at the intersection of these crises to provide a fresh outlook for youth confronted by their community’s challenges. By directing resources and opportunities toward these under-served youth, our goal is to educate and motivate students to adopt an entrepreneurial vision for their own future. This conference will introduce students to the skills necessary for entrepreneurship (project planning, future forecasting, opportunity recognition, financial planning, public speaking, negotiating), and our digital library of resources will serve as a lasting source of information to enable our youth to think beyond their environment and to pursue opportunities that help them realize their full potential.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Inspiring Healthy Futures
Inspiring Healthy Futures 10 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Prototypes is often a last stop for women and their children who have immediate needs like access to shelter and food, but also complex mental health and substance use issues. With 11 locations in Los Angeles, and serving 12,000 people annually, Prototypes currently reaches underserved communities as a critical safety net for individuals seeking intensive and individualized treatment. Prototypes works to make sure that health disparities are reduced for the most underserved communities, increasing this population’s overall health and access to care. Additionally, Prototypes has made infrastructure changes in preparation for healthcare reform ensuring that our services continue to reach underserved care as individuals gain access to health insurance. Prototypes’ unique social service model fills a much needed gap in care in Los Angeles and is directly benefiting children who may have not received services or who may have been sent to the child welfare system when their mothers entered residential treatment. Each day, Prototypes provides children with shelter, food, counseling and therapeutic daycare in a safe and nurturing environment alongside their mothers. The women receive intensive and integrated services that give the tools to care for and support their children, ensuring their health and that their opportunities for success are not denied. This project works to remove health as a “hindrance to human development” as we envision a better Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Jobs for LA’s Cleantech Future: the FLoW Multiplier Program
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The FLoW program will create new cleantech companies in Los Angeles. This will mean high-quality, better paying jobs for the underserved communities in Los Angeles. It will also help provide a skilled workforce and idea pipeline for the already growing cleantech community in the region. By basing these companies here in Los Angeles, LA will become the test bed for the next generation of clean, energy efficient technologies, which will meet the region’s ambitious clean energy goals, and will improve environmental quality.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Jumpstart: Preschool Changes Everything
Jumpstart: Preschool Changes Everything 12 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>The benefits of our project are both short-term and long-term for Jumpstart children and families, as well as the Los Angeles community. </p> <p>In the short-term, the children we serve will get the type of education that wealthier kids get, laying a foundation for success throughout the rest of their lives. One hundred children will benefit from Jumpstart’s intensive program, designed to promote the language, literacy and social development that children need to succeed. The cornerstone of the Jumpstart program is the Jumpstart session, a 2-hour period during the school day in which our volunteers lead a series of highly-intentional, structured activities that develop children’s vocabularies, promote their oral language skills, and introduce them to fundamental concepts across a range of subjects that they will need to understand in order to begin kindergarten prepared.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the communities we serve will also benefit from the books and resources that Jumpstart provides – both in the classrooms it serves and in the homes of children and families. By hosting literacy-themed events in the community and through regular communication with parents and caregivers, we will also share strategies for how to incorporate learning and literacy into everyday life.</p> <p>In the long-term, given the extraordinary returns of investments in early education, the children we serve today will live healthier, more fulfilling lives and Los Angeles will derive the ensuing social and economic benefits.</p> <p>But, by partnering with you, we have a chance to attack the problems of both access and quality. Providing disadvantaged children with an excellent early education experience is the best way to get Los Angeles where it needs to be. However, despite what the Los Angeles 2050 Report calls an “obvious payback on investment,” early education does not receive the funding it needs and is perpetually in danger of being cut. For example, according to ECEWORKS!, a project of First 5 Los Angeles, “90% of brain development happens before the fifth birthday. [But] over 95% of education dollars are spent on programs for kids older than five.”</p> <p>The challenge is to generate support for the importance of both greater access and higher quality early education experiences for disadvantaged children in Los Angeles. Jumpstart and the Goldhirsh Foundation are natural partners in this endeavor. Jumpstart possesses immense knowledge about early education and child development, a proven program, and partnerships with many of LA’s leading universities and early education providers. Meanwhile, the Goldhirsh Foundation has earned a reputation as an innovative grant maker and convener. Most importantly, the Goldhirsh Foundation has the platform to broadcast our work together, mobilize support for early education, and work with community leaders to develop a collective impact approach to addressing this problem, which is at the root of so many others.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
KIPP Through College
KIPP Through College 114 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The neighborhoods of South and East Los Angeles, where KIPP LA students and alumni live, face astonishingly high levels of illiteracy, drug abuse, gang violence, and juvenile crime. Schools are overcrowded and underperforming; virtually all traditional public middle and high schools are failing according to No Child Left Behind. Overall, fewer than 10 percent of students in these neighborhoods attend a four-year college or university after graduating high school and only 4 percent go on to obtain a degree.</br></br>Today more than ever, students in underserved communities need an outstanding education to prepare them for success in life and to overcome the cycle of poverty. Research suggests that by 2018, 63 percent of jobs will require some higher education. By comparison, only 36 percent of jobs will be available to those with a high school degree or lower, leaving those without higher degrees access to even fewer jobs than they have today. Over the course of a lifetime, college graduates will earn on average $1.6 million more than those without a degree.</br></br>Unfortunately, the youth of South and East Los Angeles are highly unlikely to graduate high school college-ready or go on to graduate college. According to The Education Trust West, only 22 percent of LAUSD students graduate with the requirements necessary to enroll in a University of California institution. This is the case for only 16 percent of Latino students. Research suggests that just over half of these students will matriculate to college and only 41 percent of them will graduate. Based on these figures, we estimate that only 4 percent of students in South and East Los Angeles actually obtain a college degree within six years.</br></br>KIPP LA, on the other hand, is succeeding at helping students from underserved communities “climb the mountain” to and through college. With the unwavering support of KIPP LA’s KTC team, 96 percent of our alumni are attending 140 high-performing, college-prep high schools, and nearly 85 percent are currently attending over 80 colleges and universities across the country. We foresee that our alumni – as self-directed, purposeful college graduates – will also work to improve educational and economic opportunities across Los Angeles. This will mean stronger economic outcomes, such as lifetime earnings and employment rates, in the city’s currently most underserved areas. Thus, supporting KIPP LA is not only an investment in underserved students’ education and preparation for college; it is an investment in the future of our city and country.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Kids Play at Pershing Square
Kids Play at Pershing Square
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The PAB wants to establish a place for kids to be outdoors, dream, play and learn to work with others. So whether kids are playing on the playground swings at recess, or having friends over to swing on their own swing sets, it's more than playtime; it's a time to grow. A playground is a wonderful place for children to release stress. Swinging, jumping, climbing and running are good for children both physically and emotionally. Taking time away from structured activity is an important part of keeping a child well-rounded and healthy. A playground is not just a playground. It's a place for kids to dream, relax and learn to work with others. By nurturing our children in this way, we help create a healthier community. Downtown Los Angeles has a changing demographic with 50,000 new residents and a growing number of children. Currently, here is no playground for them to play, dream and learn. We want to fill that void.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Kids who sling kale eat kale: Launch 5 School Garden CSA's in LA's Food Deserts
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Provide low-income teens jobs, work experience, socent exposure and fresh, organic veg. Weigh the students, measure health impact Bootstrap would-be school-garden based produce non-profit companies and teachers with an executable economic model Insert fresh, organic produce into "food deserts." Support urban/rural farm partnerships in California Identity best practices in the school garden/rural farm CSA model

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
L.A. Kitchen: Neither Food or People Should Ever Go to Waste
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

- empower older Los Angelenos, those not returning to prison because of participation in our program, and foster youth who will avoid their anticipated cycle of life-long system-living - use healthy food to offer meaningful volunteer opportunities - unite diverse populations in the battles against hunger and poor health - help the city redefine aging, making LA more whole, freeing up resources used to address declining health and prison terms, and redistributing it in much more impacting ways Too many volunteer experiences achieve little for those purportedly being served. Our efforts to train at-risk members of our community for decent jobs mean we are pulling men and women out of the service line & empowering them to be part of the solution. Volunteers will see that transformation in action, and demand similar accountability and results from all their community service activities. Financial donors demand detailed accounting and transparency; nonprofits owe volunteers the same respect when they give their time and labor. Second, we will bring together a diverse group of L.A. residents to fight hunger together. We will place special emphasis on recruiting and leveraging older volunteers, men and women eager to redefine retirement. LAK will engage thousands of these experienced community members each year, empowering them to remain active and involved as they grow older. Our intergenerational approach will unite our elders with at-risk youth, especially those in the foster care system. We will also offer a meaningful mentoring program that is specially geared toward preventing destructive, shortsighted behaviors and negative outcomes among foster youth. Many of these mentors will be fellow trainees, men and women returning from years in prison who made the mistakes and learned the lessons the hard way. We will empower men and women who have turned their lives around to counsel and coach young people about the key decisions involved in avoiding prison and addiction. In turn, the younger men and women will help older trainees transition into the cyber-world of today. Helping any one of these populations is valuable. Helping them to help one another is visionary. Third, we will engineer a change in business practices and political debates by educating and engaging individuals as consumers and voters after they come to us as volunteers. The success of our social enterprises will empower nonprofits to launch new enterprises and inspire for-profits to change their approach. When consumers understand the full costs of substandard wages and low-quality food products, the competitive balance of the marketplace will shift. Similarly, individuals will have a new understanding of the vital role nonprofits do and must play in political debates and policy solutions if we are to meet the challenges of this century. We will be nonpartisan, but not nonpolitical.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA American Indian College Education Initiative
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

According to the U.S. Census Bureau in 2008, 155,010 American Indians live in Los Angeles. Los Angeles led all of the nation's counties in the number of people of this racial category. The LA American Indian College Education Initiative will help American Indian students achieve academic success middle school through college for the purpose of becoming successful and positive community roles models in Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA Civic Engagement Lab
LA Civic Engagement Lab 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our overarching goal is to use this integrated ideation, prototype and deployment process to significantly change citizen interactions with each other and government in ways that deepen people's connection to and investment in Los Angeles communities. Over 500 volunteer hours will be dedicated to the NDCH, through participation in the day long event. This project will give those who might not traditionally volunteer an opportunity to use their skills as community organizers, designers, developers, or subject matter experts, to contribute to improving the future of Los Angeles. By partnering with local community organizations, we also hope to attract populations who are distrustful of Los Angeles’ government, or who have had no previous exposure to the inner workings of local government. These might include undocumented immigrants, formerly incarcerated people, youth, low-income people, non-native English speakers, and minorities. Engaging these communities in the process of government, providing them with contacts at City Hall, and ensuring that government services are directed toward these groups is vitally important for a city that continues to struggle with enormous racial and economic divides, and in which many residents harbor deep resentment toward local government agencies. In addition to volunteering, the participants will leave the event with new connections and relationships with other community members, and those connections will be nurtured through the prototyping workshops, where teams that formed during the NDCH will continue to meet, collaborate, and create together. The ideas discussed and prototyped during from the NDCH will be geared toward social connectedness, producing greater involvement in the community by residents. This, in turn, will lead to community input at City Hall that is more representative than what is typically received, resulting in solutions that respond more directly to community needs. But we also expect that relationships formed during the process of Civic Lab will be valuable to participants as they seek to establish networks that can later assist in everything from public safety to childcare to finding a job. By bringing diverse groups of people together, the Civic Lab will create bonds that strengthen neighborhoods and promote the health and well-being of its residents. Additionally, the CCIP aims to have a longer-term impact beyond the region, both in California and nationally, by creating a documented set of practices that other regions can use to come together across cities and sectors in an effort to foster more engaged communities. This will establish Los Angeles as a leader in the space of civic innovation, instilling pride in residents and the local governments that serve them, and encouraging further collaboration between the two.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA Creates! Media Arts Learning Initiative
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Bringing LA’s most recognized industry into the classroom will have immediate AND long-range effects. The LA2050 Report states that 36% of LAUSD students do not graduate high school, adding “That’s up to 20,000 Angelenos entering the modern economy every year and competing without a high school degree.” Per LAUSD staff, this is a conservative number since it does not account for students who drop out before reaching high school. A student’s decision to drop out of high-school is frequently the result of negative school experiences (e.g., academic failure, suspensions) that often begin before the ninth grade. By targeting middle school students, LA Creates! is being designed to appeal to young people at an earlier stage in their education and serve as a catalyst to change this trajectory. To capitalize on the area’s surging creative sector (one out of every eight jobs in Greater LA, per the 2012 Otis Report on the Creative Economy), LA Creates! will work with Consortium and industry stakeholders to help students develop skills identified by local employers as vital to our continued leadership in the creative industries. These skills are needed for arts-related jobs and careers, such as animators and digital effects artists, as well as non-arts STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) careers that also value media arts training, because they require communication, collaboration, and problem solving skills, all of which are developed through media arts education. To ensure that the arts and culture ecosystem in LA continues to significantly enhance human development while outpacing other cities in the U.S. and abroad, “LA must recruit, train and retain the next generation of creative artists” (LA2050 Report). An important aspect of LA Creates! is the development of the new Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in the historic Wilshire May Company building, adjacent to the LACMA campus. This new museum will build on the Academy’s vast archival resources, important ties to the film industry, and robust year-round public programming. It will also complement LACMA’s focus on the visual arts, including the arts of the moving image. Film Independent, an organization that empowers filmmakers to tell their own stories in their own voices, currently works with LACMA on its film programs. Film Independent is a DCA grantee for “Project Involve,” a 20-year diversity program dedicated to cultivating the careers of filmmakers from communities traditionally underrepresented in the industry, and will be a natural collaborator for this project. Moreover, LAUSD will incorporate LA Creates! into its five-year strategic plan for arts integration in public schools, with the final goal of creating a sustainable Media Arts program involving all 85 LAUSD middle schools and reaching the 120,000 middle school students enrolled yearly. The Goldhirsh Foundation award would be a critical first step in launching the initial year of this ambitious pilot.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA Green Teen Summit: 2050 and Beyond
LA Green Teen Summit: 2050 and Beyond 7 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Over the course of the LA Green Teen Summit, these young leaders will identify the “hot topic” for LA that they want to focus on in the coming semester. This might be greening their local community, starting with elevating the rate of waste recovery on their school campus, through to carbon reduction initiatives in support of LA’s goals to reduce its emissions and dependence on fossil fuels. Following the Summit, ACE will support the students in taking action on the key issue that they identified as critical for immediate priority. Taking the skills that they learned, youth leaders will come together in smaller teams to tackle the issue in their local communities, share their ideas for citywide action and campaign for the initiatives that they want to see implemented. ACE will offer mentoring and guidance, connecting teens to relevant partners and helping them to arrange meetings with district authorities, local politicians, and civic leaders. Student leaders will be connected to each other at the Summit and beyond, through online interactions and offline actions that they will take together, supported by ACE. In December, the teens will come together again for a half-day Town Hall meeting with key representatives from the city of LA and local media. Selected student leaders, supported by their peers, will address the panel of guests and lobby for the changes that they want to see in their city. The city representatives will be given the opportunity to respond with a facilitated Q&A session. The event will be set up and publicized well in advance, providing an opportunity for the city authorities to hear the collective voice of youth speak about what they want to see happen now – and over the next 10, 20, 30 years – to ensure a thriving, sustainable future for LA.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA Kids Rock!
LA Kids Rock! 6 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<i><b>LA Kids Rock!</i> will lift reading and math test scores</b><br> “<i>Thank you so much for this program. I have a young man in 4th grade who has a severe reading disability and Skoolbo has been one of the programs he has taken to!!! We are so excited to see how much he has improved. Thanks a million…</i>” – A teacher from Florida.<br> <br>Learning pedagogies underpinning <i>LA Kids Rock!</i> include:<br> • Make learning fun!<br> • Individualized, differentiated curriculum.<br> • Immediate feedback and support.<br> • Fast paced efficient learning.<br> • Multi-layered rewards and motivation mechanism.<br> • Reports and analytics for parents and teachers.<br> • Provide many opportunities for positive affirmation.<br> <br><b>Children will be more engaged and positive in their learning</b><br> “<i>Our children LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this app!</i>” – a teacher from Maine.<br> <br>Engagement and success in learning are essential for creating sustained positive attitudes towards learning.<br> <br><b><i>LA Kids Rock!</i> will support teachers in their vital role</b><br> “<i>One of the main challenges a teacher faces is providing differentiation to their struggling students and their advanced students. Skoolbo allows my students to work at a pace and challenge that is most appropriate for them.</i>” – A teacher from California.<br><br><i>LA Kids Rock!</i> will support teachers by:<br> • Providing powerful learning analytics and reports.<br> • Differentiating learning through sophisticated, in-built algorithms.<br> • Creating exciting learning environments which lead to less behavioral issues.<br> • Engaging and including parents and wider family members in the students’ achievements.<br> • Alerting teachers to critical learning milestones in the student’s progression.<br> <br><b>Lower high school dropout rates in years to come</b><br> “<i>For many students the dropping out process commences in elementary school. The two most consistent indicators of ultimate school dropout are early academic performance and students’ academic and social behavior.</i>” - The California Dropout Research Project.<br><br> Success breeds success, conversely failure often leads to more failure. A happy, successful elementary education will result in a reduction of high school dropout rates.<br> <br><b>Bring the community together to focus on supporting children’s learning</b><br> • We believe society as a whole needs to take greater ownership of education. Each and everyone of us has this responsibility.<br> • <i>LA Kids Rock!</i> will connect parents, grandparents, teachers and community in one common purpose – supporting children’s learning.<br> <br><b>Decrease the disparity between the education “<i>haves</i>” and “<i>have-nots</i>”</b><br>• <i>LA Kids Rock!</i> will be completely free of charge and accessible to every child regardless of economic circumstances.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA Open Acres: Transforming Empty Space Through Collaboration and Empowerment
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles is one of the most park-poor cities in America: the Trust for Public Land found that only 30% of the LA’s four million residents live within one quarter mile of a park compared with 80% and 90% in Boston and New York, respectively. The shortage of parks and open space is most acute in Los Angeles poorest neighborhoods, exacerbating a chronic disease and obesity epidemic that is closely tied to poor diet and lack of exercise. Given the critical need for parks, open space, and urban agriculture and the city’s limited ability to develop these resources on its own, LA Open Acres partners are spearheading an effort to create a new model that capitalizes on the opportunities that exist in vacant and underutilized land throughout the City, particularly in the areas most in need. No public agency or non-governmental entity in LA has comprehensively identified where and how much of these vacant lands exist and the potential for new green space. Limited access to this information disables efforts to re-purpose these sites into better serving uses. However, there is no lack of imagination on the part of community members. Using networks fostered by CHC for over 20 years, LA Open Acres together with communities will use this newly-available and -accessible information to push forward exciting and innovative open space projects that are in tune with particular local neighborhood conditions, needs and visions. LA Open Acres can provide an opportunity for Angelenos to serve as a national model spurring innovation and dramatic change by organizing and advocating for better use of empty and underutilized space. The data, maps, and online networking tools provided by the LA Open Acres Project will allow community members to find information about available empty spaces, and connect with their neighbors to start organizing, in cooperation with landholders, for access to unused parcels. By providing information and resources, the project will allow others to work together to launch initiatives to transform the local environment. Furthermore, this data will inform the development of multiple planning processes occurring in the city now, including the development of a South LA Open-Space Master Plan. This project will allow more people to access information, connect with decision-makers, and participate in the planning process in their neighborhoods to create healthier neighborhood environments.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA Stories — Writing on the Job
LA Stories — Writing on the Job 12 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will directly benefit Los Angeles in three ways. First, it will provide an alternative medium through which we can understand our city and, in particular, understand its landscape of employment and income. By understanding this landscape, we can begin to understand not only better understand the problems that our city faces, but more importantly we can begin to know the right questions to ask as we move out of the recession and into a vibrant, productive city for the twenty-first century. This understanding will be directly encouraged through the free distribution of the volume to schools, libraries, and other public intuitions, providing these organizations an opportunity for community-building events, and directly providing them with a new resource. Second, it will spark positive change through new mutual understanding, shared connections and experiences, and the perception of potential futures. Storytelling is the catalyst for change not only with income and employment, but also with a shared rapport across the entire city, and across its many neighborhoods and communities. And third, it will provide employment and income to the largest and most underemployed group in Los Angeles: storytellers. By partnering with poets, fiction and non-fiction authors, screenwriters and playwrights, journalists, and writers of all stripes, we will foster a community out of what is currently a fragmented yet incredibly potential-filled group, and we will promote a new generation of literary greatness in Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA Street Vendors: A Better Economy through Low-Income Entrepreneurs
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Street vendors are already an iconic part of Los Angeles’ national reputation for culinary excellence and innovation, as well a daily part of city residents’ lives. In low-income communities, almost everyone has a neighbor, a friend, or a family member who at least supplements their family income with street vending. Although street vending as an occupation has existed for hundreds of years, it is often part of the underground economy, which means that it is a highly insecure line of work. Currently vendors are under constant threat from both the city and petty crime, which vendors cannot stop out of fear of police persecution. In addition, because vending is illegal, the city makes no tax or licensing revenue from it and pays fees for policing and storing confiscated equipment. Through partnerships with small business, vendors gain a powerful ally in exchange for helping to revive and adorn empty LA sidewalks in front of those businesses. The creation of a forum that brings formal and informal businesses together will strengthen both sectors through idea-sharing and collaboration. Vendors will increase the capacity of their businesses and be more effectively able to fill market niches by understanding the existing business landscape. In 2050, legalized vending will have moderate costs in the short-term from creating and enforcing new licensing, but will lead to tremendous long-term economic growth benefits. Entrepreneurs on the street operating will no longer fear legal repercussions and for the first time will be able to sustain and grow their businesses, invest more in equipment, and build meaningful relationships with small businesses. And, for those who wish, a legal system for street vendors will create an entrepreneurial pathway for them to grow into their own brick-and-mortar businesses in the City—businesses with a high likelihood of re-investing locally. Additionally, the whole City will benefit from new income from licensing and tariffs. Developing of a venture capital fund to support street vendors will allow the City to invest in its low-income entrepreneurs. The fund will provide capital for vendors to buy new products, certified equipment, hire staff, or even pay for permits. Financial support will not be provided as a loan, but as an investment, in exchange for a minority stake in the business and a commitment from the vendor to work with a “board member” or “advisor” to support the growth of the business over time. At an agreed upon point, the vendor will have the opportunity to “buy out” the minority stake sold; money that will be re-invested into the fund to support other entrepreneurs. Ultimately, support for vending has the potential to organically bring investment streams into the poorest areas and communities of LA. It will allow enterprising individuals to lift themselves up by their own bootstraps, creating their own jobs to provide for their families.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA v2.0: Transforming LA into a World Class Place to Live
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Let's face it. Life right now in the Los Angeles region is a dysfunctional mess. Millions of us suffer every day through the infamous reality of how difficult it is to slog from far-flung housing to jobs, without the adequate commuter options that other cities around the world have, but we have never managed to achieve. With high demand versus available supply, some choose to move to more affordable suburbs and exurbs – but then contribute to the traffic problem (given the lack of adequate transit options), contributing to the gridlock that blocks new housing from being built closer to job centers and bringing down costs in the first place. Revolutionizing access to housing by transforming Angelenos commuting options will transform the daily experience for commuting Angelenos, open up a revolutionary number of new, denser housing options constructed near rail stations and near job centers, and reduce costs for transportation bared by working families, freeing up income to be able to afford housing in the first place. With a functioning transportation system anchored by fast, frequent, subway, light rail, and commuter rail options -- plus bike-friendly and walkable neighborhoods, community fears about developments' traffic impacts won't stop transit-friendly housing from being developed. And LA will be able to build the housing density around job centers needed to meet our housing challenges, making housing more affordable as supply increases to meet demand. Meanwhile, existing areas with more affordable options -- from the San Fernando Valley to traditionally lower-income areas across the region, will gain better access to jobs. And Angelenos with the newfound practical option of ditching their car and commuting by fast, efficient transit options, will see huge savings (estimated at $900/month: http://bit.ly/XFWdVk) that they can use to help them afford their housing costs. OTHER BENEFITS Getting LA a fully-built-out rail system will bring huge gains in quality of life for Angelenos, dramatically changing the game for many, if not all, of the LA2050 indicators, e.g.: * environmental quality: car dependency and sprawl leads to smog and public health problems * income & employment: LAEDC says Measure R’s transportation construction will create 409,080 jobs with labor income of $24.9 billion over a thirty year period (PDF: http://bit.ly/14mznJk); we propose something significantly more ambitious than this, which will create magnitudes more jobs * public safety: improving mobility would improve emergency response and free officers to attend to public safety issues instead of inching along in bumper-to-bumper traffic * social consecutiveness / arts and cultural vitality: Angelenos are less likely to volunteer, participate in nonprofits, or attend arts and cultural events because traffic (and lack of rail alternatives) makes getting there so onerous.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA's Promise: Improving Schools, Empowering Neighborhoods
LA's Promise: Improving Schools, Empowering Neighborhoods
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The zip code of a child’s home should not determine their academic success, let alone their future. In the next 5 years alone, LA’s Promise will expand to feeder schools to create a comprehensive K-12 community and educational infrastructure serving more than 20,000 children and their families at flagship high schools we have helped improve. By 2050, this work will have changed our region, and through all of it, LA’s Promise aims to prepare every child it serves to be college- and career-ready, healthy, and successful in life. Based on its core vision, LA’s Promise focuses on six hallmark programs, each of which will be brought to benefit at least 6,000 students in the short-term and tens of thousands more in the years to come: - Innovative Education, which implements research-based programs including Blended Learning that links technology to learning; Linked Learning that advances career-based learning; and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) career-themed educational and study tracks. - Go for College, which works with partners to create a college-going culture for all students by providing college tours; assisting with financial aid, application, and college fair processes; and by generally exposing the student body to an array of public and private colleges and universities. - Teachers & Leaders, which provides professional development and instructional support to teachers and administrators to offer high-quality education to every student in every class. - 7 to 7 offers an array of before- and afterschool programs designed to make the school site a trusted and enriching community hub from 7am to 7pm every day, and often for hours beyond. - Promise Parents, which offers ongoing parent education courses, volunteer and leadership opportunities, and consistent and ongoing parent communication to ensure parents are aware of the steps to take to secure their child's education success. - Health & Wellness, which has developed three primary activities to ensure access to fundamental health services for every student at an LA's Promise school: (i) health, vision, and dental screenings; (ii) restructuring and supplementing health, PE courses, and activities related to nutrition; and (iii) coordinating health and fitness trainings for parents and youth to promote wellness and disease prevention. Through all of its efforts, LA’s Promise will work to prepare every child in LA’s Promise Neighborhood to be successful, resulting in entire communities being transformed as these children move into successful adult lives. In the coming year the LA’s Promise Neighborhood will see the return of its first set of college graduates, most of whom will also be the first-ever college graduates in their families. LA’s Promise has designed its model to be scalable; in the long-term, the benefits will expand beyond the specific geographic focus of the LA’s Promise Neighborhood to reach underserved and low-income communities across LA.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA, the capital of mindfulness in 2050
LA, the capital of mindfulness in 2050 12 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>This project will create a world class resource for training leaders in the mindfulness movement in the heart of Los Angeles. With new access to a property of 17 acres of pristine nature, this project will enable InsightLA to create a functional space for training health care professionals, educators, and other community leaders to become mindfulness practitioners and teachers in Los Angeles. By 2050, the program will have trained thousands of Mindfulness Ambassadors for the city, including health care professionals, educators, and community leaders, and provided the catalytic support to make Los Angeles a 'mindful city' that addresses health and environmental indicators upstream. In addition, free training resources will be provided online, so anyone can improve their mindfulness and drive positive behavior change in their own lives. This project, while focused on health, attacks all of the indicators at their root, by giving each of us and all of us the tools and training to be more mindful and considerate about the way we engage with the social, political, and natural environment and contribute to our families, our communities, and our city.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LA2050 Youth 4C Leaders
LA2050 Youth 4C Leaders 14 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

By focusing on students in alternative education high schools, Youth 4C will intercept a segment of society that is on track to become inactive participants of democracy. Students in alternative schools regularly enroll in these charter schools after struggling in a traditional school setting, and are up against the high dropout rate that faces students in underserved communities. Often from backgrounds that include poverty, incarcerated parents, and gang violence, these students are most at risk to become part of the statistic that only one out of every twelve individuals with less than a high school education will vote in a Presidential election. The LA2050 Youth 4C Initiative pushes education levels aside and brings forward 70-100 grassroots leaders to pave the path for their community to have an active future in social and civic engagement. Barriers and misconceptions about politics and advocacy will be broken down by illustrating that small steps, such as signing a petition or being involved in a student group, can make a difference in your community and your city. At the end of the project, the LA2050 Youth 4C Initiative will have impacted thousands of students and parents in communities with low voter turnout, low levels of civic participation, and low levels of political discussion. The Youth 4C Initiative aims to have the following impact on Los Angeles: 1) 70-100 youth grassroots leaders from underserved communities trained, 2) 2000 students engaged in an issue advocacy campaign, 3) 1000 parents engaged in an issue advocacy campaign, 4) 500 students and communities members at Youth Advocacy Summit to show Los Angeles there is a future for social connectedness, and 5) a new mindset in these communities that anyone can take action and get involved.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Many major cities have flourishing public art programs that help define the urban landscape and build awareness of contemporary art and culture, yet Los Angeles is lacking in this arena. Through L.A.P.D., LAXART is filling this gap by bringing art to the streets, and inspiring residents to engage with the work. Public artworks can change misconceptions about contemporary art and grow new and diverse audiences, as the art experience changes from a static gallery visit to an organic encounter that is meaningful and inspires dialogue. We are developing a larger audience for the arts in L.A. outside the traditional viewing context, and with repeated exposure, a public that feels ownership of and embraces artwork that emerges locally. L.A.P.D. benefits Los Angeles artists and audiences. The program gives working artists the opportunity to experiment with new methods and media and to consider their work as part of their home environment. Such projects will help L.A. to sustain its position as a hub for art and culture, and allow us to train and retain the next generation of visual artists, knowing that there are possibilities for their creative practice that await beyond the norm. The LA2050 public projects, including two sculptural installations, five billboards, and a painted building façade are part of an ongoing effort to enhance open spaces. Commissions will add to the character of the city, and we hope that local residents will more readily welcome art in their lives with increased exposure in the public sphere. The city will enjoy a larger audience for contemporary art, as the expansion of L.A.P.D will prepare residents to receive the extensive body of work that LAXART will present in The Occasional in 2015.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LAUP/LA2050 Preschool Research Project
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

In the year 2050, LA will need to rely on an exceptionally well-educated population to continue to compete as a world class, industry-leading city. With the world economy shifting from Europe to Asia over the coming decades, LA is geographically poised to be a major leading influence in the world’s economy. But right now, our education system is in peril, and the societal consequences show up in our crime rates, graduation rates, income levels, and subsequently the overall strength of our economy. With this research project establishing LA as a leader in early education research and advocacy, we have the chance to restore our education system and emerge with a strong and thriving middle class. Previous research shows us that early education funding can save at least $14,716 per child just in crimes never committed, reduced justice system costs, increased tax income due to higher earnings, reduced need for special education services, and reduced welfare costs. LA has specific challenges to overcome and local research will help us to develop program to target LA’s deficiencies. Minorities are LA’s fastest growing population. LAUSD is approximately 73.4% Hispanic. Minority populations have the greatest disadvantages in our school system, as do English-language learners. At the same time, the benefits of a preschool education tend to be most pronounced with minority children of lower socio-economic status, with specific benefits in bridging the gap between English and non-English language learners. The US is projected to become a minority-majority nation by 2043, and minorities, now 37% of the U.S. population, are projected to reach 57% of the population in 2060. With L.A. County projected to increase by almost 3.5 million residents in 2050. Quality research on early education will help us to establish our place in the global economy. LA’s students are already at a major disadvantage to our fastest growing competitors. In 2009, US science and math scores came in behind 22 other nations, including China, Japan, South Korea, Belgium, Hungary, Canada, Finland, and Estonia. While other nations are improving, US test scores remain stagnant. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently told a room full of science and math experts of the National Science Board, "We are lagging the rest of the world, and we are lagging it in pretty substantial ways . . . It has huge implications. I think as a real economic imperative, we have to educate our way to a better economy." We need to focus our efforts on the educational infrastructure now, and close the achievement gap to avoid a situation in which our largest population is the least well-educated. We could lead the nation as one of the world’s most desirable places to live, invest, and partner, because of communities that rank as the safest and most desirable in the nation, and have a top-ranking education system that produces socially responsible and well-educated people.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

In some LA neighborhoods, 2 in 3 people are living in or close to poverty! The problem is more than income, it is about the systems that fail to help families get a toehold, and ultimately, discourage them from achieving their goals. Services are often fragmented, bureaucratic, and are built on the stereotypes that uphold the belief that those with less resource are to blame for their circumstance. In contrast, what we find every day in LIFT offices is great resilience, resourcefulness, and endurance that exists in the face of tremendous challenges and stigmas of poverty. LIFT-LA knows that systems built on false premise of who poor people are and what poor people need perpetuate the cycle of poverty (50% of those who move out of poverty will fall back into poverty in a year’s time). It is due to this built-in shortsightedness that billions are spent annually in the fight against poverty without moving the needle significantly over the decade. This is an economic issue for all Angelenos, but also one of social connectedness. A critical piece of the puzzle is still missing: relationships and understanding, aka social capital. We have all faced moments of crisis in our lives when we relied on the guidance and emotional support of friends and family to help us overcome seemingly insurmountable challenges. Likewise, community members struggling with poverty need more than financial assistance; they need help accessing services; they need social connections and emotional supports; they need an empowered voice. LIFT-LA’s model features volunteerism, empathy, and resource connections that are client-centered attending to both immediate needs and long term aspirations. On average, LIFT helps clients secure 2.5 major outcomes – employment, housing, healthcare - per family. LIFT’s model has been vetted by the Robin Hood Foundation to have a ROI of 3:1. LIFT’s approach demonstrates how a human-oriented safety net system might work for LA. The Shaky Ground Campaign combined with LIFTopolis helps to shift the perception of poverty to create the stage for client centered evaluation. Channels for developing empathy are created through our constituent voice strategies. The LIFT app will allow for clients to speak up about how well (or not) they have been helped by a given provider. Constituent Voice is at the forefront of innovation in the public sector; the world largest charity rater, Charity Navigator, recently added constituent voice to its new set of rating criteria. This rating informing philanthropy provides huge incentive for optimal service delivery which would in turn create a more economically just LA. This voice, when heeded, has the power to change policy to more effectively allocate tax and philanthropic dollars to create economic opportunities for individuals and transform communities. Empathy + Consumer driven evaluative measurement = Empowered change!

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
LOLA, the Lifelong Organizational Learning App
LOLA, the Lifelong Organizational Learning App 79 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>A healthier Los Angeles Educational landscape: digital, efficient, forward moving. <p> <p>The G o l d h i r s h F o u n d a t i o n has identified in their report that: Education received the lowest rating, meaning that is a significant impediment to human development. This outcome was based on the fact that the public school system in Los Angeles is failing many of its students. Graduation rates are low and too many kids throughout the county are not completing the necessary college preparatory coursework. Enrollment and investment in high-quality preschool is also lacking. On top of this, continued cuts at the state level are making a bad situation worse. Given that education is such a fundamental aspect of human development with far-reaching effects, the stark disparity in educational opportunities for the county’s students is unacceptable. Let’s start with this question: what do current special education services cost in the United States? According to Nathan Levenson, in a study sponsored by the Fordham Institute special education represented about 21 percent of all education spending across the nation in 2005, or $110 billion, compared with 18 percent in 1996. (Layton 2012) <p>Who are we talking about in Los Angeles? In LAUSD alone, approximately 77,000 students currently have Individual Education Plans, of which some 50,000 students are identified as having trouble with executive function. (Cross & Joftus,2011)<p> <p>In an era of budget cuts, can we do better? Yes we can! The current implementation of 1:1 aides has not proven effective and so far the main tool used when a child needs help –this is tremendously expensive and not a solution that works towards increasing independence.<p> <p>LOLA, a universal tool, requiring a relatively small investment will yield not only a huge learning impact on a large number of students, but also make a tremendously positive budgetary impact. <p> <p>Think about it: the typical 2013 modern-day LA classroom relies heavily on inconsistent, ineffective and costly practices such as: paper agendas, paper lists, verbal cues and one-on-one aides, whereas LOLA creates an individual organizational system opportunity, along with a respectful and private communication system through digital technologies.<p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
La Loma Center: Green Education, Environmental Resources, and Job Training
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will benefit Los Angeles in numerous ways as was discussed above. Specifically, we will have a major impact on the creation natural parks, beautiful gardens, and public spaces to organize community. LA has a shortage of green spaces, we solve that problem. We will empower the community with information and work, hosting regular classes, community workshops, and job training on a variety of relevant sustainability issues. Specific subjects include Arboriculture, Aquaculture, Beekeeping, Soil, Water, Seeds, School Composting, Compost Tea, Vermiculture, Xeriscape, Drip Irrigation, Dry-Stacked Broken Concrete Terracing, Masonry, Carpentry, Metalwork, Edible Gardening, Food Preservation (solar dehydration, canning), Fruit Tree Pruning, Green Roofs, Greywater, Living Walls, Natural Building (cobb, adobe), Natural Pools, Permaculture, Rainwater Harvesting, Urban Agriculture, Rocket Stoves/Ovens, Solar Power, Conservation Remodeling, and so much more. Our facilities will provide a perfect location for school field trips, afterschool programs, regular farmers’ market, as well as special events. We will become the place to go for cutting edge information and resources to improve our environmental health and urban sustainability. Designers and contractors will depend on us for the dissemination of ideas and supplies, hopefully inspiring the replication of the model. DIY people will be empowered by our offerings, and commercial and institutional clients will turn to us for leadership in creating jobs and getting their environmental projects completed with beauty and integrity. Los Angeles currently does not have a place like this in the entire county, there are many pieces to the puzzle, and we are putting them together to help accelerate our economic and environmental recovery.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Learning Equipment Supply Service 6 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

My project will support higher achievement in science in Los Angeles schools, and will contribute to the pipeline of scientists and engineers needed to replace the aging workforce in L.A.'s considerable technology and bioscience industries. As many as 50% of the current workforce in those industries locally will become eligible to retire within the next five years. A larger, more diverse pool of qualified engineers and others will benefit L.A. significantly over the long term. Further, increased familiarity and comfort with science at the middle and high school level will increase the number and quality of local applicants to college and technical programs. A better, more diverse, larger applicant pool will benefit technical employers in Los Angeles such as Baxter Healthcare, Google, Grifols, SpaceX, others whose hiring needs are expected to increase in coming years. In addition to this economic benefit to the area, my project may create a better understanding of scientific issues among the general public, including voters. Such a voting public will have a better understanding of how to evaluate what is presented in the media about science issues relating to public policy, such as energy generation, pollution, climate change, and many other issues. My project empowers future, voting Angelenos by helping them to acquire the background knowledge that they will need to form well-reasoned opinions on local issues of electoral interest.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Teaching at South Gate Middle School for the past four years, our founder supported his students towards record-breaking mastery levels on the California Standards Tests. Now, the smartestk12 team wants to share the success with all Los Angeles county, and eventually the whole country as we all prepare to meet the digital assessment needs of the impending Common Core. There is no secret formula to improved success in the classroom, yet no one can argue in the power of data. Our goal is to make the data tracking process extremely easy and teacher-friendly. For LA county, this means that all 145,000 students PreK to grade 12 can be standards mapped using our website. Also, all teachers, parents, and administrators can be held accountable toward their growth. The current system requires us to wait until August to find out test scores. While the Common Core will be faster, we will only have data to act on by the end of the year, or at most 2-3 interim assessments. Now, with smartestk12, any student can practice every day of the year; and on every subject, including essays. With this much information, our city can eliminate students falling through the cracks, because we will know performance almost instantly. In LA, 1 in 4 students drop out because we did not help them in time, and often we did not know where to help them academically. Likewise, 3 of 5 students do not finish college prep requirements because we push them forward to the next level regardless of any true level of mastery. With a computer adaptive system, a student in one seat can be practicing in calculus and the student in the other can be working on basic number skills. Yet, in each program, the student will be receiving content perfectly suited for their needs and the teachers, parents and administrators involved will be 100% aware of those needs. We can now provide accountability before the end of the year, meaning that LA schools can actually hold data to a teacher or student. And finally, professional development will match the needs of the teachers, because there will be no hiding from intervention needs. LAUSD's chromebook push: While at LAUSD, our founder built smartestk12 and had a 3-year average Academic Growth over Time rating of 5.6 out of 5, placing him in the top 1% in his subject. This means that his students grew far beyond their expected levels, adjusted by previous scores, ELL status, socioeconomic status, etc. However, beyond the adjusted growth, his students showed real performance levels in the top of the city, with over 100 students scoring at the highest level (Advanced), annually. When a system works, it enables critical thinking and more time on quality instruction and meaningful programs for kids. Smartestk12 will intimately work with LA's schools. Currently, several have agreed or have shown deep interest in completing Beta Testing this fall, including various LAUSD schools, KIPP LA schools, the UCLA Lab School and the DaVinci Schools.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Listening, Communication and Conflict Resolution Skills for Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

It will help advance the mission of "a mediator on every block," allowing neighbors, co-workers and family members to better interact and create more profound social connections.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Los Angeles Invisible People Chapter and Film Festival
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Invisible People connects people to the face of homelessness in a direct and meaningful way that humanizes the subject and builds empathy in the viewer. This is way more important and impactful than simple awareness. </p> <p>A Los Angeles Invisible People Chapter will help engage tens of thousands of new stakeholders to take tangible action to end homelessness in Los Angeles. </p> <p>The Los Angeles Invisible People Film Festival will engage young adults to create socially-conscious media on the social crisis of homelessness in Los Angeles. This event, and the media created, will generate awareness and education helping to drive political actions and volunteerism to end homelessness in Los Angeles. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Los Angeles Promise Neighborhood: Transforming Public Education
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

LAPN will transform low-performing schools into high achieving learning centers. The LAPN school transformation model can be replicated throughout the City so that all children have access to an excellent education that prepares them for college and careers. YPI has developed performance measures to track progress toward achieving goals that demonstrate specific and quantifiable ways that LAPN will benefit Los Angeles and make significant progress on the Education metrics within five years. Metric: Test Scores - Increase percentage of students who achieve score at or above grade level on the CA Standards Test in math from 34% to 67% and English Language Arts from 36% to 69%. - API scores will increase to exceed the CA goal of 800 within five years. - English Language Learners who score proficient on the CELDT test will increase by 8 percentage points each year. - Special education students who score at or above grade level in math and ELA will increase by 7 percentage points each year. Metric: High School Completion & Drop Rates - Increase high school graduation rates from 54% to 87%. - Increase attendance rates by 0.3-0.5 percentage points each year; decrease truancy rates by 4-5 percentage points each year. - Increase high school students passing the CA High School Exit Exam by 2 percentage points each year. - Re-enroll 100 out-of-school youth back in high schools each year, and increase percent of out-of-school youth who obtain a diploma or certificate from 55% to 75%. Metric: College-Going Rates - Increase percentage of students passing A-G courses with a "C" or better from 45% to 85%. - Increase percentage of LAPN high school students who graduate with a regular high school diploma and obtain a postsecondary degree, vocational certificate, or other certification/credential from 40% to 72%. - Increase percentage of parents who complete college workshops and demonstrate knowledge of how to support children through the college process to 98% by year 5. - Increase percentage of middle school students with a college-advancement action plan by the end of 8th grade from 65% to 90%. Metric: Preschool Participation - Increase percentage of children from birth to kindergarten entry who participate in Center-based or formal home-based early learning programs from 48% to 73%. - Increase percentage of three year olds who demonstrate age-appropriate functioning across multiple domains from 57% to 77% and children in kindergarten from 41% to 65%. Metric: Afterschool & Summer School Enrichment - Increase percentage of students in the Promise Neighborhood who participate in high quality learning activities during out of school hours from 47% to 72%. When LAPN achieves these outcomes, Los Angeles will benefit from a well-educated workforce prepared for high wage jobs. This results in higher tax revenues and a stronger economy, with less need for expenditures on social assistance.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Los Angeles Review of Books
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

LARB will provide, for the people of Los Angeles, a source of lifetime learning, global in scope and yet local in its perspective and in many of its concerns. Our website will be a meeting place for everyone interested in culture in all its various guises, an open forum for anyone to participate in. --- Our presence in local media, as in our current collaboration with KCRW and our work with KCET in development, will help more people become engaged with the literary, artistic, and intellectual life of the city. Our public programming, like our current collaborations with The Broad Stage, LiveTalksLA, and LAPL’s ALOUD series, will continue to increase in breadth and frequency, bringing a series of newly conceived, multigenre performances to a variety of audiences, building on the work being done on our website. And, in turn, our national and global presence will help bring readers elsewhere an appreciation for L.A.’s contributions to culture; that is, we will post podcasts and video digests of these events on our website and our YouTube channel. Our public programming will enhance the offerings the city already has, and our partnerships with the arts and culture organizations listed below, along with, we hope, partnerships with many more, will help integrate our famously fragmented city. --- We bring the most recondite and specialized research from our major universities, art schools, and colleges and make it accessible to anyone in the city. --- By placing the writers in the worlds of film and television, the literary writers, the popular genre writers, the academic writers, and the newspaper and magazine writers, we build bridges among tribes that have long kept their distance from one another, with benefits in all directions. --- Our work with high schools will help engage students with culture in many different ways. --- We will be a new and vigorous and innovative partner with all of the arts and culture organizations in town in the project of bringing the world to Los Angeles and Los Angeles to the world. We will help recruit, train, and retain the writers and critics required to keep Los Angeles the most important city for arts and culture in the country.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Los Angeles Youth Orchestra Community Building
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project directly impacts the future of Los Angeles through our students. Our students directly impact the greater community through our concerts. LAYO students are proof that playing an instrument and participating in an ensemble positively affects academic success. 100% of our participants graduate high school and most go onto college. The Los Angeles Youth Orchestra positively impacts the community through our audience. People who attend our concerts can't help but share the joy and enthusiasm our musicians demonstrate while performing. This positively impacts the cultural vitality of our city through the participation and support of the arts.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
MADE by DWC: Education and Job Readiness for Homeless Women
MADE by DWC: Education and Job Readiness for Homeless Women 38 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

DWC’s mission is to provide permanent supportive housing and a safe and healthy community fostering dignity, respect, and personal stability, and to advocate ending homelessness for women. Los Angeles is currently the homeless capital of the United States; the Los Angeles Homeless Services Agency’s 2011 count found more than 50,000 homeless individuals in LA County, with a high concentration of those individuals on Skid Row. One-third of these homeless individuals are adult women. Our Education and Job Readiness Program is a direct response to the service barriers and gaps that directly impact Los Angeles’ homeless and extremely low-income women. According to a 2010 Women's Needs Assessment, the Skid Row community has an extreme lack of accessible education and employment opportunities. Among women surveyed, 68.2% lacked a high school diploma or GED equivalent, and only 7.6% had college degrees, the lowest level since the survey’s creation in 2001. Nearly half (46.9%) lacked access to computer classes and/or internet, and 59.4% of women identified educational opportunities as a resource they would most like to see in local community and service centers. Of women surveyed, 90.3% did not believe there were employment opportunities available in the downtown area, and only 4.3% reported income from employment. Women in homelessness are often thrust into instability as a direct result of poor physical and/or mental health, disability, loss of employment, and familial loss, among other issues. As federal funding for affordable housing and social programs faces further cuts, we are investing efforts into providing women with practical skills and alternative income to increase their long-term independence. Our Education and Job Readiness Program will influence the personal wellness and stability of Los Angeles’ most underserved population, while also impacting the well-being of our local community on multiple levels. We will (1) increase direct access to job-training and employment services (2) ensure stabilization of our participants, assisting them in building skills and reentering the workforce, (3) reduce utilization and decrease dependency on high-cost emergency services, (4) mobilize the Los Angeles community through volunteerism and the shopping experience, and (5) improve the overall social, economic, and health outcomes on Skid Row. In addition to providing direct benefits to homeless women, DWC’s programs engage members of the greater Los Angeles community. Volunteers lead many of our SET to Create product-development workshops, offering both practical skills and mentorship to participants. Our two MADE by DWC stores bring in foot traffic and engage our neighbors in the local economy. Additionally, the MADE by DWC product line is offered through several locations across Los Angeles, including Bloomingdale’s in Century City, and several Hudson News locations at LAX, expanding the scope of our public education efforts.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
MASTERY LA: Map Learning & Expertise for Lifelong Exploration
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

1. Map over 1000 masters of Los Angeles to show pockets of expertise and human resources ready to be connected. 2. Help youth discover opportunities to continue their education inside and outside traditional learning environments in fun, interactive ways. 3. Provide a bridge to funding, grants, technology, training and support for transitional youth who may be falling through the cracks through open events with experts on hand to help. 4. Match the masters of LA and the students who are ready to learn new skills for new apprenticeships and guilds. 5. Offer events that contribute to cultural/arts/connectedness within our communities through alignments with partners throughout the Los Angeles creative communities and other LA2050 grantees. 6. Provide momentum for independent learning with tools to track progress and demonstrate skillbuilding for employment. 7. Connect thousands of learning resources already engaging in improving LA and help people find the best community resources for their personal growth. 8. Understand how we learn better over time and help each individual find an individual learning path that suits their preferences and abilities. 9. Improve dropout rates by providing alternatives that are engaging, local and appropriate for the individual learning profile. 10. Encourage mastery learning and 21st century skills by showing the high quality talent already working within Los Angeles and how we can all work together to make a more amazing and creative city together. 11. Work together to envision the city we want to live in at hackathon events and city festivals. 12. Empower students to finish their GED by making it into an interactive game played in Google Hangouts to bring together transitional youth with opportunities to learn and complete goals. 13. Provide easier access to grants and local funding opportunities for foster youth and other young adults who may be prone to homelessness without support. 14. Improve literacy and soft skills by utilizing tablets and mobile devices to creatively engage difficult students in new ways, using music, hands-on experiences and local masters to bridge the gaps in learning. 15. Create ripple momentum for a @MasteryLA campaign to encourage everyone to become a master in their chosen field and follow their passion through social media and events. 16. Encourage youth to share their learning process publically through events, social media, in learning centers and on the EDDEFY platform. 17. Map the connections between masters and students and how these relationships evolve over time to understand how to improve local education and mentorship services. 18. Identify the areas of the city where services need to be focused for future success between now and 2050. 19. Partner with great local resources to grow great relationships between youth and local masters: BuiltinLA, Mentor organizations and Foster Youth organizations: Kids Alliance, ILP, First Place for Youth

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
MLoveizm Supports, Empowers and Inspires Los Angeles Artists
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

MLoveizm Magazine facilitates opportunity to build character, expand thought processes, develop business mindsets and think on a deeper level of production in all areas of art to create movement through value and purpose. We focus on the end goal in order to navigate through the lasting importance of their mission by asking “Will it help others?” We do this by connecting, collaborating, encouraging, and taking practical steps forward in personal and business identity, social networking and creating opportunities to become involved in group projects and production that not only create training but jobs and outreach to places beyond South Central’s four walls. We believe art can create revolutions, change minds, touch hearts and provoke action. MLoveizm hopes to cultivate Artists that create art that will do just that. The ripple effect will be endless and to everyone’s benefit not only in LA but everywhere. We hope it starts in LA.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Make Los Angeles the Innovation Capital of the World
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

LAMCII is focused on six specific areas of concern and interest. They are: Education, Policy, Capital, Comparative, Narrative, and Network. We are developing concrete projects aimed at making a real impact on not just the technology and innovation sectors of Los Angeles, but on how the citizens of Los Angeles interact with the city, businesses and each other. All projects are geared towards attracting, and retaining: diverse talent, entrepreneurs, businesses and capital to Los Angeles. In the last year we have begun: The Texpo Innovation Hubs: LAMCII is working in a public/private partnership with the City of Los Angeles, local universities, and recognized environmentally conscious developers to transform city-owned properties along the Expo line transit corridor into ‘innovation hubs’. Innovation happens with diversity: different businesses and organizations bumping up against one another on a daily basis will bring about new and interesting ideas, projects and solutions. These hubs will provide world-class physical space for startups and new economy businesses as well as community space that serves the dual purpose of providing a resource to local groups, organizations, and citizens and exposing our friends and neighbors to the opportunities inherent within the tech sector. Phase one is underway at the Jefferson Transfer Yard, a 220,000 square foot facility slated to become the first Texpo Innovation Hub. LAMCII has identified four other sites along the Expo line that are earmarked for development in phase two of the project. Following the line to USC and Downtown LA, this will quickly enhance the flow-through of information and innovation. There will be bike rentals available at all of the Texpo Innovation Hubs, a small but powerful catalyst for green commuting, better relationships with the community, and better health for employees and residents. EdgeLA Fellowship Program: We interviewed LAMCII members, many of whom own businesses in Los Angeles, and asked how many open positions are available at their companies. In August of 2012, from 25 members surveyed, there were over 550 open positions at local companies. Los Angeles County produces more graduates and has more residents holding PhDs than any other in America, but from our survey of Los Angeles universities, we know that at least 50% of engineering graduates leave Los Angeles. There is a huge opportunity for a stronger relationship between the nearly 1.1 million college students and businesses in the greater LA area, fulfilling the talent needs of LA’s growing entrepreneurial ecosystem. LAMCII seeks to bridge this gap by working with businesses, universities and city colleges to create the EdgeLA Fellowship program. The program will be a one-stop-shop to connect businesses looking for bright, well-educated talent with students looking for longevity and meaningful experiences. We are working with Internships.com, a local business, to build a platform that makes it easy to navigat

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Make one Healthy Choice... Then Make Another.
Make one Healthy Choice... Then Make Another.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The city of Los Angeles is a salad bowl rich in food and culture. By exposing these mostly Hispanic/Latino youth to the many different cultures, healthy food options and physical activity, we will give them a hands-on learning experience that will allow healthier food choices and create greater cultural awareness. The goal is to create dialogue, not only with the participating youth, but with communities in other parts of Los Angeles, to help create better understanding and awareness of the differences and commonalities amongst Angelinos with a focus on healthy eating, food literacy, and physical activity. By exposing the youth to culture through healthy food options across the abundant landscape of Los Angeles, we will begin to create bonds and bridges between cultures and minority groups. A culture of health and fitness will be promoted in the Latino community that will reduce many of the health consequences of obesity we listed above. This reduces the public health risk that the Department of Public Health has identified about obesity. Thus, a healthier community actually is a less social service reliant community and can benefit all Angelenos in an unintended manner. Healthy eating can also be attributed in minimal studies as having other health benefits such as overall happiness, activeness, better school performance, and community participation. On a business perspective it is accepted that eating healthier also raises economic awareness and can benefit all of Los Angeles. By promoting health and creating discussion amongst the different sectors of greater Los Angeles, we are empowering Angeleno children for the rest of their lives.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Making LA
Making LA 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

de LaB anticipates that our audience will be thrilled to support a yearlong “Making LA” series, in which each person has the chance to meet and interact with the creative individuals--architects, designers and artists--who are shaping and in some cases, reshaping, the future of Los Angeles. Measurements of success will based upon de LaB’s ability to reach new and diverse audiences at rapid speed, which we have done in the past. <br><br> In spring 2012, de LaB’s Subway Terminal Tour spiked the organization’s number of email subscribers by one third in a single month due to the overwhelming desire by Angelenos to understand our city’s great past. de LaB anticipates that new programming that has the impact to affect the way people feel about their city will foster the same enthusiasm. Additionally, de LaB’s goal, as always, will be to reach more and more diverse communities of Angelenos who attend our events, not because of a particular affiliation with the design community, but purely because they love the city in which they live and they want it to be a healthy, sustainable and dynamic place well into the future.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Making LA TraffickFree: ending trafficking 1 COMMUNITY at a time
Making LA TraffickFree: ending trafficking 1 COMMUNITY at a time 20 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

LA will benefit from the trust, mutual support and unity established as all of its citizens are invited to participate in the creation of 10 new TFCs. These TFCs will bring citizens from diverse racial, ethnic, language, socio-economic and educational groups to learn from one another and then develop and lead coordinated and comprehensive strategies that will strengthen the city. Empowered with the knowledge and skills they receive from Oasis USA and its partners, LA’s citizens will be equipped to leverage their resources and networks to engage key stakeholders to use their collective power to build and shape LA. Moreover, building the capacity of LA’s citizens through participating in TFCs can be further utilized in grass roots efforts focused on other key areas of community development. TFCs will host and facilitate numerous trainings, awareness and outreach events, listening groups, workshops, and other community engagement strategies, while also developing and sharing prevention and education campaigns and tools for various sectors of the LA community. These resources will inform and educate a significant number of LA’s citizens on the dangers of trafficking and enable them to identify the warning signs of trafficking. For example, as a result of TFC community engagement strategies, local law enforcement officials will better understand and implement the laws and practices regarding how to serve trafficking victims, identify perpetrators, and manage trafficking investigations. These strategies will also ensure victims of trafficking know what resources are available to them and how to access such resources. As trust and cooperation are built between law enforcement and the citizens of LA, there will be a greater flow and exchange of information and transparency between these two groups regarding victim resources, perpetrator profiles, trafficking routes and hotspots. Greater community awareness, as well as the trust established and mutual support built through shared learning, communication and strengthened relationships will promote safer and healthier choices. When local individuals are empowered with knowledge and resources, recognizing they are not isolated from their peers and community structures but rather connected to supportive and caring networks, it becomes much more difficult for traffickers to operate there. Even more, traffickers will recognize that it is simply not profitable for them to do business within LA. Trust, communication, mutuality and connectedness can be extended to each of the eight stakeholders critical to affecting change for those experiencing isolation and at risk for trafficking within the city of LA. We envision the citizens of LA developing creative solutions that combat trafficking, reduce the demand for slaves, educate and protect those are at risk, and restore those who have been victimized with the full support and resources of this community.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Market Makeovers: NextGen Leaders
Market Makeovers: NextGen Leaders 39 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

East L.A. and Boyle Heights, like many under-resourced neighborhoods, have had their fair share of solutions presented to them by experts, usually from outside their communities. Some of them get implemented. Of those, few are implemented long enough and with adequate resources to take root, to become part of the fabric of the community it serves such that members of that community claim it as their own. The issues around the East LA + Boyle Heights food landscape and poor health outcomes among its predominantly Latino residents are serious and unhealthy food behaviors deeply entrenched. According to the L.A. County Department of Public Health, its population suffers high rates of obesity-related chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and stroke. It has some of the highest rates of childhood obesity (32.2%) in the county. The situation will not change overnight. Because NextGen Leaders are from the community, their fellow community members are more likely to listen to what they have to say. Their actions on behalf of their neighborhoods carry greater weight. They can lead from within, in a way outsiders can’t. Support for Market Makeovers: NextGen Leaders is a long-term investment in the future health of East L.A. and Boyle Heights, a model of home-grown leadership development that could be applied all over Los Angeles. Market Makeovers increase access to healthy foods and broaden awareness and education about healthy eating and behaviors; its engaged community participation results in greater buy-in and a better chance at sustainability. Extending these efforts through the NextGen Leaders will result in a cadre of trained, engaged and experienced young leaders who are deeply rooted in community change and who have worked extensively on projects prior to their 24th birthday. NextGen Leaders have skills in: media production; public speaking and presentations; visual communication; teaching and peer leadership; healthy eating and nutrition; media literacy; and social marketing that are invaluable in many fields. And they are placed in an infrastructure that nurtures their development and allows them to directly effect change, whether in their immediate community or throughout L.A. The NextGen Leaders’ age group falls in-between many philanthropic efforts and services, whether or not they are enrolled in higher education. Their needs are acute. Having worked with teens for over twenty years, we often see youth hit an economic and opportunity ceiling once they graduate high school or reach age 18. Even in college, they are isolated from their communities rather than placed into learning and service opportunities in their neighborhoods, where they can deepen their roots and connections. Scholarship programs often don’t come close to covering the true cost of higher education. Vocational programs tend to train professions, not creative leaders. Through Market Makeovers, we can change this and the food landscape together.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Mentoring through Education Movement
Mentoring through Education Movement 4 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Mentoring through Education will benefit LA by providing innovative, hands-on, and experiential educational services and workshops, with the development of Learning Communities. We expect over 300 students to be served throughout Los Angeles County in high-crime, high poverty communities over the course of the project. However, through the implementation of Learning Communities, the number of individuals served throughout Los Angeles will multiply drastically. Through these teaching communities, LA will benefit by creating more jobs, decreasing unemployment rates, improving the health of LA residents, creating safe environments for residents to live, and inspiring residents to educate their children at a very young age. Mentoring has shown to positively impact the lives of youth all over the world. It has inspired young people to face and overcome obstacles within their lives. Through the Mentoring through Education Movement, this project will revolutionize the way of learning, allowing young people to have a support system as they progress through not only their educational goals, but their lives. Through our embedded mentoring, community service, and restorative justice approach, we expect LA to benefit from our young leaders who are succeeding and giving back to their communities. By fostering young leaders to reach their goals and succeed in their lives, we expect the same individuals to model and inspire other young people to become future leaders. Collaborative Tutoring envisions the increase in high school diploma attainment rates within the Los Angeles County. With this, we expect that college-going rates will increase. It is our goal to build up young leaders that will pave the way for their own children and embed education within their children’s lives.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The trees planted will sequester the carbon dioxide in the air and provide oxygen to breathe. A total of 300 trees can counter balance the amount of pollution one person produces in a lifetime. Trees shade our homes. This saves energy, so people who adopt these fruit trees will receive energy savings. Tress raise ground water tables and are useful in helping to capture, filter, and restore rainwater to the groundwater table. Trees provide many benefits including: • More than 8% of children in Los Angeles – 217,000 – suffer from asthma. Studies have shown that an increase in tree-lined streets could lower that number by almost 25%. • Research presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference (AAAS) in Chicago showed that the presence of trees could cut crime by as much as 7% • Two University of Illinois researchers (Kuo and Sullivan) studied how well residents of the Chicago Robert Taylor Housing Project (the largest public housing development in the world) were doing in their daily lives based upon the amount of were fewer contact they had with trees and came to the following conclusions: there are fewer reports of physical violence in homes that had trees outside the buildings. Of the residents interviewed, 14% of residents living in barren conditions have threatened to use a knife or gun against their children These fruit trees will provide benefits to each individual or family who plants them beyond the environmental benefits that everyone who breathes air in Los Angeles will receive. They will be able to grow their own food. For some families, these fruit trees may be the only access to fresh, healthy food that they have. Fruit trees will help adults and children incorporate healthier foods into their diet. One example of a food desert is South Los Angeles. According to the Community Health Council’s South Los Angeles Health Equity Scorecard, there is 0.10 supermarkets per square mile over 44,000 square feet in size.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Mindful Education for LAUSD
Mindful Education for LAUSD 8 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles benefits when our public education system serves the needs of the child and adolescent in the 21st century: People who can initiate and create the new world of work, playful emotionally resilient socially aware people, and people who can think deeply and with imagination. These 21st century needs will be met when our educational system changes to one that is based on a biologically, psychologically, and ontologically correct concept of the human mind in childhood and adolescence. We call this "mind-fit" education. Mind-fit education is mindful education because it enters the reality of the child. When the curriculum, teaching methods, and methods of assessment work in synchronicity with the student's developmental age and individual strengths and capacities learning is irresistible. Educational success, and life success, begins at the K-8 level. The Mindful Education for LAUSD project will be a test-bed demonstrating its value for every student and especially for traditionally hard-to-reach students. Part of the project will be to track the data-points of success - attendance, engagement, behaviour, and initiative as well as on traditional metrics.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Moving Voices of Los Angeles
Moving Voices of Los Angeles 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>According to the Goldhirsh Foundation's My LA 2050 report, "…the immigrant population that propelled the area's growth in recent decades is becoming more deeply settled, and they're rearing a new generation of California natives." The immigrant experience is a story worth preserving, studying and learning from for both the individual community and Los Angeles as a whole. </p> <p>Moving Voices of L.A. will create accessible and easy to use tools to share experiences and create an online community of storytellers.</p> <p>The Moving Voices of Los Angeles will:</p> <ul><li><strong>Connect communities</strong> </li><li><strong>Bridge generations</strong> </li><li><strong>Stimulate action</strong> </li><li><strong>Lead other cities</strong> </li><li><strong>Provide a picture in voices of its communities</strong> </li><li><strong>Become source materials for future use</strong> </li></ul>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
MyARC: A digital social network that solves educational challenges one project at a time.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Make LA a better place by making connections between students across the city and remapping the LA’s educational network. Funding MyARC will sow the seeds for its continued development via and through LA’s youth. They will take over its development and operations, guided by the ARC staff, our partners, and, eventually, an emergent network located across LA and based around its public school system. MyArc will make LA a better place by forging connections between students, schools, curricula, private enterprise and diverse neighborhoods within the city. The Web has been touted as having the power to connect, to democratize, and to bridge geographical locations into a global village. That potential has been largely withheld from LA’s neediest students in our public schools. But we need to confront and tackle the obstacles to employing digital social networking in education. MyARC does that by proceeding with deep knowledge of current trends in the digital humanities, education reform, and the actual operations of LAUSD, Green Dot, and other LEAs (see our partners). We must refocus education on connections not constraints. MyARC will connect students across LAUSD; it will invite the private sector to support and fund education via MyARC’s online challenges and rewards; it will support the development of an LA-based youth workforce by providing practical, skill-based and project-based learning. Zooming out to larger impacts of this project on LA, we can foresee an investment in our digital-based program for alternative education as striking a match that illuminates LA as a creative destination for education reform-related industries. By connecting these individual nodes into a larger LA-based network, MyARC reforms the social network that is Los Angeles. It connects and benefits individual students, teachers, classrooms, schools, after-school programs, and the community at large. Building a platform to harness the powers of the digital network for the good of LA’s public school students is good for LA. The students of today are, of course, the future of LA in 2050 and beyond.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
NHM Urban Safari
NHM Urban Safari 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The pleasure that comes from seeing a hummingbird, hearing a songbird, catching site of a beautiful butterfly, or spying a lizard are well known to rural and suburban dwellers. These experiences are available even in the heart of L.A, where thoughtfully planted pocket parks can quickly attract a rich array of wildlife. Individuals, city planners, school builders and even factories can, with little investment, create biodiverse locations anywhere. This project will make that know-how widely available. NHM will invite and teach Angelenos to see wildlife and understand what attracts it. By engaging everyone in studying this wildlife, and by making the results of our research widely and easily accessible, we will empower everyone to understand that thoughtful planting, even of a single tree, can make all the difference. We now know that we will spend the next century adapting to a changing climate. How we do this in cities is critically important: most people today live in cities. Quality of life depends on environmental quality, which depends not only on chemical and physical parameters, but on ecosystem health. To manage ecosystem health, we must know the players on the stage. We need to know the species that make up our regional biodiversity. Angelenos adapting to a changing climate depend on that knowledge. Studies like LA2050 have established that a lack of green space is a detriment to many urban environments. With NHM’s Citizen Science programs, we can document the existing wildlife corridors in our city and provide planners, park designers and community members vital information that can help inform park construction, development and community programming well into the future. NHM’s Citizen Science program elevates open spaces and parks from recreational areas to legitimate biological habitats where ongoing study of our natural world can take place. We reclaimed 3½ acres of parking lot to create a giant living laboratory and field site for the study of local wildlife in our South Los Angeles front yard. Visitors step off the Expo Line train into an oasis of L.A. nature and biodiversity in the heart of the city. Our Nature Gardens have been designed by renowned landscape architect Mia Lehrer, and seeded with dozens of plants and landscape features native to the area. It is growing into a habitat representative of wild Los Angeles. Accompanying the Nature Gardens is the 6,000 sq. ft. Nature Lab where visitors can both report and study L.A. wildlife and its distribution in their neighborhoods and across the city.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Narrative Replacement Therapy: Reimagining the Heart of Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Narrative Replacement Therapy for La Placita Nueva will benefit Los Angeles by restoring its historic core, both physically and emotionally. Building off renewed interest in Downtown LA, Grand Park, and the growing transit system based at Union Station, the one-kilometer circle that is the subject area will unite everything from the LA River up to the Music Center, from Little Tokyo to Chinatown through a comprehensive masterplan to draw tourists, new residents, and new economies to the vibrant heart of the city.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
NativLA: Discover the city you thought you knew
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

According to the LA2050 report, the environment where people live, work and play is a key component of quality of life. But in the City of L.A., only 8% of the land surface is public parks and only 29% of L.A. residents live within a quarter-mile of a public park, leaving more than 600,000 children without access. While the city strives to create more equitable greenspaces, NativLA’s mission will be to connect all Angelenos to urban nature opportunities in every neighborhood in the city, inspiring environmental stewardship and fostering a city-wide understanding of how nature sustains life. According The Center for Eco Literacy, nature is our teacher, sustainability is a community practice, and sustainable living is rooted in a deep knowledge of place. “When people acquire a deep knowledge of a particular place, they care about what happens to the landscape, creatures, and people in it. When they understand its ecology and diversity, the web of relationships it supports, and the rhythm of its cycles, they develop appreciation and a sense of kinship with their surroundings. Places known deeply are deeply loved, and well-loved places have the best chance to be protected and preserved for future generations.” – Center for Eco Literacy

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Neighbor to Neighbor: Connecting Los Angeles Through Storytelling
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

By organizing diverse teams to tell a story about a local hero in 15 different neighborhoods across Los Angeles. This project will: 1. Engage at least 300 volunteers. 2. Build community among people of diverse backgrounds. 3. Deepen connection to neighborhoods by highlighting local heroes. 4. Provide basic training to at least 45 novice filmmakers who can transport their skills into the job force.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Can you imagine, a Los Angeles with a large system of parks, gardens, micro-spaces, plazitas, parklets, pedestrian walkways that lead to and from work, play and living spaces? By taking simple ideologies of space, connectivity and landscape, Los Angeles can become a beacon for urban environments around the country. We want the community to be involved in the planning and construction of greenspaces in their own neighborhoods, to make a deeper connection to their environment. The manual will provide communities with a guide for identifying greenspace opportunities and designing cost-effective solutions, and implementation which will help to see projects built in their communities much sooner than later. The purpose of the manual will be specifically designed for communities based on socio-economic conditions but can be used by any neighborhood throughout Los Angeles. As reported in the LA2050 report and several, recent scholarly studies, low-income, communities of color have the greatest need for access to greenspaces. The manual will take in mind specific land use opportunities or restrictions, culturally-sensitive relationships with space, and other unique community characteristics. With this framework, the manual will be able to be utilized and implemented in similar communities and cities throughout the country. By facilitating the process of creating the needed greenspace in multiple communities, the manual will directly benefit Los Angeles as a whole. These are grassroots playspaces, nature spaces, and contemplative spaces. With the implementation of these greenspaces Los Angeles will reap the benefits of planting trees and vegetation that sequester carbon emissions and improve air quality; designing permeable surfaces such as low/no mow grasses and porous paving will capture and clean stormwater; creating beautiful, clean greenspaces will spur economic investment; and providing areas where adults and youth can interact with the natural environment in their neighborhoods will create ample health and wellness opportunities by combating nature deficit disorder. In addition, the manual will create greenspaces that will revitalize neighborhoods: studies prove time and time again the more greenspace a community has, the higher the property values. The aesthetic appeal of the neighborhood due to the addition of greenspace will encourage investment into the neighborhood. <b>These will be greenspaces that will support communities to thrive, not just survive.</b>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Never Built: Los Angeles
Never Built: Los Angeles 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p> The stories surrounding these projects reveal a reluctant city whose institutions and infrastructure—from a fractured power base to risk-averse developers to reluctant neighbors —have often undermined visionary work. Our goal is to change this culture, shedding light on the city's many missed opportunities so that visionary, creative, innovative ideas in the large-scale pubic realm will once again be embraced here. Furthermore, much of Los Angeles is ugly and poorly planned. Another aim is to end the complacency about this fact. We want to connect the inherent appeal of unrealized designs to the daily experience of the built world. We want people in Los Angeles and elsewhere to regard beauty and livability as essential rights in their lives. <p/>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
OPENHealth Central  Putting the "care" back in healthcare
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The personal, community, and healthcare costs associated with treating chronic illness are crippling Los Angeles; the costs associated with not treating such cases are even greater. The influx of newly insured people in Los Angeles is taxing an already burdened system, because a significant number of these families have serious untreated illnesses and challenging social barriers to negotiate. New strategies must be adopted now if we are to make headway by 2050. OPENHealth Central is designed to help clinics better plan and coordinate the in-home and clinical care of patients with chronic illnesses before their conditions grow serious, complex, and expensive. Baked into the shape and purpose of OPENHealth Central is a data-collection regime that aids clinics in improving quality of care and reducing costs. In addition to directly benefitting the patients and clinics using OPENHealth Central, these data will help identify which 'needles' to move across Los Angeles, helping to determine what is achieving positive results, and sharing those insights broadly. These data, in turn, will provide policymakers and clinical practice leaders the information they need to channel resources where they are most needed. L.A.'s current safety-net approach to healthcare (like the rest of the state's) is limited to face-to-face strategies, emphasizing the volume of medical encounters over the value of medical attention. This must change if we are to improve outcomes while decreasing per-capita healthcare costs. OPENHealth Central is designed to increase the volume and value of care encounters while driving down costs, in part by providing digital tools that make it easier to make care decisions more accurately and swiftly. Community-oriented care organizations (such Lybba's collaborator, Family & Parent Centered Care Partners,) strive to achieve the IHI Triple Aim of improved patient experience and care processes, improved outcomes, and better cost controls. But these organizations lack the computational infrastructure to make methodical and swift progress. Without data and the IT infrastructure to direct care resources optimally, even the most dedicated physicians and their care teams have difficulty discriminating between effective and ineffective care strategies. The business model for OPENHealth Central is centered around providing that infrastructure at low cost to clinical practices that would otherwise be unable to build their own. The good news is that people actually will take better care for themselves and one another, especially when they have continuous, personal relationships with healthcare providers who know their case well and can help them achieve lifestyle and wellness objectives. Primary care practices in under-served communities are best positioned to be partners with these individuals, provided they have the tools they need to manage the care of their population.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
OUT THE WINDOW: Videos on LA buses
OUT THE WINDOW: Videos on LA buses 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Out the Windows will benefit Los Angeles beyond its impact for “Arts and Cultural Vitality”. By using the indicator that is performing well, art in the public sphere, Out the Window will assist four other of LA 2050’s key indicators. Health: Perhaps one of the most pressing issues facing bus riders is health access, a key issue being addressed in this proposal. One in five Californians are uninsured, and in many districts of Los Angeles this number is even higher. Out the Window will provide Angelinos with key information about specific health issues and means to address them including motivation and methods to access insurance and enroll in the Affordable Care Act/California Exchange. Environment: With so much of our current health inextricably tied to environmental issues, the art of Out the Window will impact this key indicator with informative videos geared to individuals’ efforts, showing what can we do to improve and protect our environs. Social Connectedness: Los Angeles’ social connectedness will be enhanced through the public exhibition and the interactive aspects of the project. The project will create opportunities for bus riders to engage with each other, local organizations, students and artists by responding to the videos. It will also inevitably incite dialogue with other bus riders, their neighbors, communities, etc. Education: Out the Window will create a more informed, curious and motivated art-making and consuming public. Students who can publicly display their labors will more likely continue making videos. From this increased visibility, a percentage will find the inspiration to utilize the ever-growing means of creating video, encouraging a new generation of video makers, writers, animators etc. to advance the aesthetic and social power of communication in an era of social media. We have already commissioned the following notable artists: • Mel Chin, world renowned artist, to address lead prevention in L.A. • Yoshua Okon to examine food industry and childhood obesity • Poli Marisol to explore mental health in relation to food consumption • Lisa Marr and Paolo Davanzo to look at diverse culture’s health practices • John Jota Leanos to describe environmental justice • Ann Kaneko to show the visible and invisible benefits of Chi Gong

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
One Day in Los Angeles
One Day in Los Angeles 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

One Day in Los Angeles will benefit L.A. by providing a participatory, cause-based media creation event related to civic and social engagement. The event will produce residual benefits across many fields, as local filmmakers will be asked to document hindrances to human development across greater Los Angeles. The archive will provide access to firsthand experiences, giving a first-hand view of the issues that face Los Angeles and, ultimately, an opportunity to create more informed solutions. The undeniable power of seeing the diversity of the Los Angeles experience through a single day enriches the perspective of who we are, interconnecting both our joys and struggles. One Day on Earth has over 100 nonprofit partners. Our staff will engage partner organizations as well as build new relationships with local nonprofits specifically for this initiative. By working with local community organizers our producers will draw attention to real frontline issues. One Day in Los Angeles will present an opportunity for local nonprofits to generate media to communicate their mission and to rally support for their cause. In addition to nonprofit outreach, our staff will focus efforts on inspiring students and educators to participate. Preparing young people to effectively communicate through digital media is a critical tool in expanding civic and social engagement. As with previous One Day on Earth initiatives, One Day in Los Angeles will inspire volunteerism around the issues that matter most to Los Angeles. With the filming event yielding hundreds of hours of media, the geo-tagged archive will be searchable by location, keyword, and subject matter. This robust video resource will be a useful tool for local policymakers, community organizers, and educators to reference and support greater insight into both high-priority local issues and cultural diversity.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Organizing Social Enterprise, Urban Farm in South Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Income and Employment: Over 525K households and 1.9M people reside within six (6) miles of Impact Farms in South LA, a community consisting primarily of African Americans and Latino populations whose unemployment rate is 18.3% and 13.3% respectively. Median household income of $54,314 for a family of four, suggests almost 950,000 people within a six mile radius did not earn enough to cover basic expenses. That 80,000 households within a mile of ImPact Farms, have median household incomes of less than $35K, suggest that over 170K people are living on less than 67% of established minimum requirements. ImPact Farms policies will prioritize hiring and training local community members including troubled youth and those needing a second chance. We will also target local source vendors. Every acre developed will directly and indirectly generate up to 30 full time permanent jobs. Half of these positions are internal and include seeding, managing the growing environment, harvesting, packaging, maintaining fluid systems and caring for fish. Indirectly ImPact Farms wis looking to develop local vendors for operational requirements and will offer funding and training to start ancillary cooperatives related to Impact Farm’s business such as distribution, packaging, and food preparation, potentially adding an additional 15 positions. Together the ImPact Farms network can generate 30X the jobs of a comparatively sized space and cost of a photovoltaic electricity system. In addition, greening and upgrading existing fields and buildings for farming operations will require ImPact Farms to invest $1.5 -$2.5 million per acre in addition to the cost of the property. While some components will be imported our intention is to engage local companies, social enterprises and cooperatives to perform work. As such, estimating labor at 30%, creates local wages for the improvements between $250-750K. Together, bringing the farm closer to the table, every 5 acres developed represents $4-5 million in annual local wages and benefits and an additional $2.5 million in improvement wages. Health: Clearly, more and more studies show that eating a variety of whole, fresh food void of toxins is our best defense against chronic diseases through improving our immune and defense mechanisms. It is in this background of food desert caused mainly by lack of access to a wholesome diet that ImPact Farms makes another important contribution. Improved health via access to affordable fresh vegetables and fruit through community supported agriculture (CSAs), local, corner stores and ImPact Farms store front. Environmental Quality: Compared to traditional soil agriculture, for every acre of production ImPact Farm saves: • 8+ million gallons of water • 40+ tons of CO2 from farms and food transportation • 90+ tons of CO2 consumed locally by plants These estimates are based on farm studies, reported water saving @70% and calculations of plant C02 absorption for 1M pounds of produce.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
PARK-IN-A-BOX
PARK-IN-A-BOX 14 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles has many park-poor neighborhoods and many communities have limited access to usable open space. Obesity levels are high, caused in part by lack of access to active spaces and programs. Park-in-a-Box, with partner organizations, will provide access to underutilized space in underserved neighborhoods, and provide the ingredients necessary for lively and useable open spaces. Through this new model, Park-in-a-Box hopes to draw attention to the need for public spaces within these communities and encourage Angelinos to re-evaluate how we think about public space in our city. Please visit www.park-in-a-box.la for more information about how Park-in-a-Box works (more images after the jump).

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
PLUNGE into the waters of the LA River
PLUNGE into the waters of the LA River 6 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will : 1. Provide a space for informal gathering and recreation in Elysian Valley community. 2. Opportunity for the local community to host and directly involve in the numerous planning initiatives around LA River development. 3. Signature art with environmental benefits that will draw the general public to the river and encourage dialog. 4. Direct improvement to watershed by segregation and release of up to 30,000 gallons of storm water v. release over dirty streets and work areas. 5. Incubate ideas of community members, design professionals and artists. 6. Allow experimentation with novel ways to handle waters in terms of landscape design. 7. Allow experimentation /investigation of control technologies for large urban cisterns. 8. Be FUN.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Padres Creando Exito: Effective educators in every classroom, every school
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles stands to benefit from this project because the academic and social (human capital) development of our students is being shaped by more than 32,000 teachers that instruct over 667,250 students ever year in our public schools. Research shows that 58% of a school’s impact on student achievement is attributable to principal and teacher effectiveness. As a result, attracting and retaining highly effective educators becomes critical to making substantial gains in student achievement that are sustained over time. Research has also shown that parents are a significant influence in the academic success of their children. Although studies often point to poverty as a significant predictor of low academic achievement, when parents and families are given the skills and tools necessary to create a nurturing learning environment, low-income families and children can defy the odds (Davis-Keane, 2007). Additionally, when parents are given decision making roles and considered equal partners in their child’s education, they can become informed and effective advocates for their child’s education. As the second largest school District in the nation, LAUSD is taking a step forward and leading the debate as it currently examines how it can best support its teacher and administrator workforce. We currently have a window of opportunity to engage in this discussion and most importantly to help shape it, so that we ensure that parents and families are seen as crucial partners and part of the solution to arriving at meaningful ways of identifying, supporting and retaining effective educators for their children. By launching a public education and awareness campaign around the importance of having an effective educator in every classroom, every school and offering tools and recommendations on parents’ roles in this issue, we will build critical links between policy development and on-the-ground teacher, student and parent realities, by broadening public accountability to include consumers. Ultimately, Los Angeles will benefit from having educators that are: - identified as highly effective to minimize inequitable access to quality teachers by low-income and underrepresented families; - supported in their profession by receiving high-quality, relevant professional development and resources to improve their craft, and; - retained in the classroom so that students have consistent and stable learning environments and teachers are rewarded for their positive contributions to student outcomes.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Paper Free Studio
Paper Free Studio 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

- About 1/4 of the 37 schools in Boyle Heights of an API of less than 5 will raise their API by 1 or 2 points yearly. - About 1/4 of the 9 schools with an API of 1 will move up 3 points by 2017 - The Paper Free Studio will transform education by showing 200 education stakeholders of Boyle Heights how to do more blended-learning & digital project based learning when teaching and mastering content. Thus, increasing the attendance rates at Roosevelt HS and feeder schools. - The project will teach educators and their scholars how to code, use GIS maps, and expose students to more digital resources to access higher education. - All schools will have at least one paper free classroom. - More digital classrooms in LA will support the 21st century student by giving them the skills to collaborate & think critically, thus, researching information more thoughtfully. - Create a professional learning network of 200 teachers and thousands of students.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Parent and Child Training Program
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

• This project can be replicated throughout Los Angeles once proven effective at Roosevelt High School. Alma Family Services’ knowledge and track record using different Evidence Based Practices and other Prevention and Early Intervention models has led to significant reduction of risk factors that might lead to violent behavior. Implementation of this program will directly affect Roosevelt High School and the community at large by addressing the roots of violence. Several studies have indicated that violence leads to truancy, lower educational attainment and thus lower level jobs. Also, the psychoemotional and financial cost of violence in schools to poorer families is high, affecting their ability to escape the poverty trap. This project aims at reducing youth’s arrests for crimes including vandalism, trespassing, and tagging. Primary and secondary prevention programs have the potential to generate systemic change. Students will be encouraged to practice cooperation and show responsibility towards their own school and community. Family engagement is critical to promote student achievement. Successful students are more likely to become productive citizens and contribute with their community, the City and County of Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Partnership for Black Workers Rising
Partnership for Black Workers Rising
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Partnership for Black Workers Rising will benefit Los Angeles by increasing Black workers’ access to quality construction jobs, holding agencies accountable for ensuring diversity in public works, and creating mechanisms to monitor agency management of project labor implementation. Our mentorship program will prepare young workers for the regulated construction industry. Our grassroots leadership development programs will prepare the next generation of union and community leaders. Our outreach will develop new and durable multi-ethnic alliances to fight for an end to joblessness and build a peaceful and prosperous LA. Ultimately, the Partnership for Black Workers Rising will reinvigorate a tradition of community action and revive areas of Los Angeles where economic growth has all but stalled. Increasing black workers’ access to quality employment will lay the groundwork to build a Los Angeles economy that includes all residents and all neighborhoods. Black workers trained through our programs will have skills to advocate for improving not only access to jobs but also resources to address health needs, neighborhood improvement, and equity and transparency that keeps Los Angeles on the track to economic justice for all.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Pavement to Parks
Pavement to Parks 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

• Adds up to 10 acres of green space and up to 5000 native plants to low-income, park poor communities in L.A. • Creates oxygen. Estimated amount of oxygen produced 3.65 million liters of oxygen per year. • Increases biodiversity in the urban landscape. Species richness of 10 to 30 species per garden. • Interactive nature programs for 500 kids. At least one program will be science-based and will be a long-term environmental monitoring citizen science project. • Develops 20 young environmental leaders. Under mentorship of park rangers and scientists, 20 youth from the community will participate in a continuum of learning and leadership. • Addresses nature deficit disorder for 500 kids. Problems caused by nature deficit disorder include fear of and lack of respect for nature, more time with “safe” indoor activities like computer games, structured sports activities rather than imaginative play -- all potentially contributing to ADD, depression, child obesity, lower grades, etc. • Increase scientific literacy and educational opportunities for 500 children. Potentially increase the likelihood of their completing high school, having greater economic outcomes and greater community engagement. • Building Community Relationships: This project will enable NPS to strengthen community relationships within Los Angeles and help spread the word on native gardens. We hope to build upon this project and continue to create more gardens in additional communities once this project is over. Seeds: The students who will lead this program are future community leaders for Los Angeles. The students who attend these programs and build their science literacy, ecological literacy, and community connections are also future leaders of Los Angeles. • Seeds: These gardens will serve as seeds of community change. We can make more gardens. This idea can spread. • Seeds: If we build it, they will come. If we make space in the city for nature, nature will thrive. • Seeds: These plants will literally make seeds. These seeds can be given away to families, used to guerilla garden medians and neighborhoods, and used to start new gardens.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Peace to Prosperity
Peace to Prosperity 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our CIS GAMES FOR PEACE project would benefit Los Angeles in a number of ways. Specifically, our CIS GAMES FOR PEACE participants come from communities with some of the lowest income and high crime areas in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley. They face a relentless assault of negative influences that often result in drug abuse, violence, teen pregnancy, poor academic performance, even death. By participating in CIS GAMES FOR PEACE, youth and young adults will develop the skills, abilities, relationships and associations necessary to foster self-esteem, persistence, perseverance and positive attitudes to overcome negative influences. Next, the project follows evidence-based models already proven to be effective. Two significant studies, Yin (1986) and Spergel (1989) evaluated strategies typically used to deal with gangs and delinquency. Both studies found that the most effective were: • Community Organization- comprehensive interagency cooperation and community cohesion among grass roots organizations, law enforcement agencies along with job development • Providing Alternative Opportunities-other activities such as sports, recreation, youth service, job training and placement CIS services and our Wrap-around service delivery strategy are in line with the “Spergel Model” and incorporate all elements of the model. Our special connection with youth and sports has been long, consistent and one of the most highly successful elements of the public safety methodology. The 252 baseball, softball, football, basketball and soccer games and tournaments that CIS has conducted have been highly effective tools in enhancing communication, reducing violence and improving the quality of life for all members of the community. The LA Times February 20, 1994 praised the football game that marked the 110th day of the Valley Unity Peace Treaty. Since then, scores of newspaper articles have documented the importance of these sporting events in helping youth avoid gangs and violence. In 2004, CIS hosted the first ever softball game between LA County Probation Gang Unit Officers and former/current gang members to enhance communication and improve relationships. In August 2005, CIS in partnership with the LAPD, hosted the 5th Annual LAPD Celebrity Swing-A-Thon. The most significant and fundamental benefit to LA is that youth and individuals formally considered as “throw-away” are re-energized with hope and can contribute positively to our society. These are individuals that others have “given up on” and who have been called the “lepers” of society. They are gang-involved or gang oriented youth and young adults who, despite their past behaviors, have demonstrated a sincere willingness to turn their lives around and become productive members of society. LA or any city and community can benefit when souls, spirits and minds are uplifted and redirected toward positive action.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Pesticide-Free Los Angeles 2050
Pesticide-Free Los Angeles 2050 30 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The conventional wisdom is that Los Angeles is polluted, smoggy and utterly beyond repair. Residents who don't know anything else succumb to apathy and do little to invest in the quality of their local environment. Beyond helping to create a healthier ecosystem (air, water and soil quality), we believe that Pesticide-Free Los Angeles will elicit an enduring investment in the local environment from a significant and meaningful number of the city's denizens. People are always shocked—then pleasantly surprised—to learn that the city is the last, best hope for the survival of the honey bee. A HoneyLove project will educate, enlighten and inspire the hearts and minds of current and future residents of Los Angeles and as a result will garner the magnitude of investment we need to reduce pollutants and restore the health of our communities. Our project's most tangible offering to the Los Angeles community will be a mobile app that allows users to track the use of pesticides in public spaces, and receive a score card for how their local park, green space, or high school sports field is performing.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Pick-Up, Pop-Up Produce Station
Pick-Up, Pop-Up Produce Station 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The immediate station area, and the larger neighborhood, is notably underserved by grocery stores, both in terms of quality and number. Access to nutritious food in grocery stores is taken for granted in more affluent neighborhoods. In this station area, residents' options are severely limited to fast food outlets or overpriced and substandard produce and groceries. The station serves a moderately dense residential area, with pedestrian traffic around the station throughout the day, and heavy pedestrian traffic at rush hour. The Pop-Up Produce Station will be a community resource besides offering access to nutritious produce by providing work and job training opportunities for neighborhood residents. Our proposal links the products of Mudtown Farms, five blocks from the station, to the pedestrians around the 103rd Street / Watts Towers Blue Line Station, providing convenient, affordable and reliable access, by transit users and pedestrians, to nutritious produce grown in the community garden. Our project will supplement the Mudtown Farms Phase III plan, which recently received a Proposition 84 State Parks Grant to enhance and maintain their urban farm. The Pop-Up Produce Station will act as a vendor outpost to the Farms. Produce grown and harvested at the farm will supply the produce stand, providing the local farmers with a reliable pedestrian consumer pool.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Porous Housing 2050: Housing Typology for DTLA in 2050
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Developing an affordable multi housing complex would contribute to revitalizing DTLA in various ways; provide housing opportunities for low income Angelinos, create work opportunities, give hope to skid row dwellers to find affordable housing, assist in restoring urban beauty, support pedestrian activity for downtown vibrancy, provide equal housing and equal opportunity by creating a homogenous community devoid of social class or ethnic schisms. We feel that if a housing typology serves as more than just a place of residence and advocates itself as social housing, it promotes a sense of community thereby insinuating self-resilience and sustainability. This allows all residents to engage as active members of the community who can socialize without biases. This is particularly important because characteristically the homeless population and low income groups tend to be isolated from mainstream society. While executing this process, there is more possibility to develop on the expansive function of housing such as advanced correlations between housing and sustainability, landscapes, urban-scapes, infrastructure which would foster further evolved typologies. Beyond generic housing complex, developing a new typology connected with public space, urban green space, or mixed-use would also serve as a catalyst to solve problems DTLA faces as urban collective housing which presently echoes a sense of reclusion from one another.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Potluck Truck
Potluck Truck 10 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles is often referred to as a city without a center, a city of multiple cities. Within this vast metropolis, many neighborhoods lack adequate public green spaces to enjoy. Only 4% of Los Angeles is devoted to public greenery, compared to 17% in New York City. Additionally, the inequitable distribution of green space is staggering, and lower income neighborhoods suffer the cost in health challenges and increased violence. Studies prove these correlations time and again. This lack of shared public space affects the ability to build relationships in the city; there are remarkably few locations to claim or meet to eat a meal. Los Angeles needs a responsive public arena - the Potluck Truck! The Potluck Truck is a mobile public space where the diverse publics of Los Angeles may choose to engage with each other and their environment, simultaneously reflecting the neighborhood’s character and the way that nature is present in the city. Using nourishment as a catalyst for social engagement, the Potluck Truck reconnects us to the history of Los Angeles as a chaparral biome and its robust farming history. Los Angeles was not always paved over; until the mid 1950s, LA County was the top producing agricultural county in the United States, surpassing the Midwest. Now only 6,000 acres are farmed in the county. Los Angeles grew as it did because of the fertile soil and year round growing season. The draw to the west came from the possibility of planting one’s desires into the landscape, turning the soil and using the land productively. Downtown Los Angeles was a patchwork of vineyards, Hollywood grew lima beans, Sylmar was the Olive Capital of the World, Watts was home for beef cattle. The Los Angeles Unified School District had required curriculum in agriculture, and specific land allocated for this use. 4-H clubs thrived as youth learned farming techniques, and today, many fallow fields remain in middle schools. The Potluck Truck is a dedicated way to acknowledge, honor and gently reinscribe lost ways of knowing and being with the land, and the value of coming together around food. The Truck is a creative platform encouraging all to participate in a form of art that, implicitly, is the commons. The shared building of ideas, responsive to specific temporary environments, may themselves become more stable in space. Los Angeles as a city suffers from vast divisions and cultural isolation, partly due to the lack of adequate public transportation and the massive area of the city. As an inclusive space, where all are invited to engage with the Potluck Truck, a shared community resource, the mode of exchange is dialogical, not based on economic currency. The Truck functions in a renewable way, constantly fueled by shifting community energy. This platform challenges cultural and economic alienation, and grows an archive of place and connection. Community members become stakeholders in the Potluck Truck, and are encouraged to create programming and events.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Power of the Pen: Writing Together
Power of the Pen: Writing Together 8 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Power of the Pen: Writing Together project will benefit Los Angeles by raising to prominence the value of creative writing and self-empowerment. The joy of sharing our stories can contribute much to the quality of life in Los Angeles. If we want to address the dire high school dropout rate of nearly 50% at many Los Angeles public schools, if we want to shift that number by 2050, we need to plant seeds now that will inspire students to want to write, and engage the community to help make that happen. In order to implement this project, we would assemble a committee of local teachers, students, parents, arts education professionals, corporate partners and experienced WriteGirl mentors and volunteers. The team would develop the slate of writing events, refine curriculum and establish recruitment and volunteer training criteria for the Power of the Pen Writing Guides. Each committee member would receive a modest stipend to help secure their commitment of time and energy. The committee would be led by a paid project coordinator, who would spearhead communications and project goals. The Power of the Pen: Writing Together project would integrate writing, education, arts education and community activism, giving all Los Angeles residents the chance to take part in the educational success of the youth of Los Angeles and connect with the creative energy of their own personal voices.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
PrepareLA – Building Resilience through Community and Volunteer Engagement
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

In recent years, we have seen an increase in major disasters across the globe—Hurricane Katrina, earthquakes in Chile and Haiti, the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, and most recently Superstorm Sandy. However, while the number of disasters has increased steadily from the 1970s to today, the reported loss of life has been decreasing, demonstrating that early warnings, preparedness, and planning can save lives. The Los Angeles region is extremely vulnerable to natural disasters such as wildfires and earthquakes. Sadly, the majority of our communities and residents are woefully under-prepared. If a magnitude 7.8 earthquake strikes—as the U.S. Geological Survey predicts is overdue—the loss of lives and infrastructure damage could be devastating. This is why we must engage our local communities now and start creating a culture of preparedness and resilience. PrepareLA will significantly benefit Los Angeles by: o Creating public awareness through multiple media outlets that provide comprehensive and continual disaster preparedness education; o Promoting volunteerism and opportunities for civic engagement; o Conducting free preparedness education presentations for residents (including youth, seniors, non-English speakers, and individuals with functional needs); o Developing multi-lingual, multi-cultural collateral materials to promote preparedness efforts; and o Offering free first aid and CPR classes to low-income and underserved communities. An example of how PrepareLA is already increasing teamwork between the Red Cross and different community segments is our partnership with Faithful Central Bible Church in Inglewood. Our relationship began four years ago when the church signed an agreement with the Red Cross to serve as a shelter site in the event of a disaster. In 2012, our Coordinator invited the church to deepen the collaboration and become a Red Cross Faith-Based Affiliate. Since then we have worked with them to host a series of outreach events and CPR/first aid trainings for church members and the community at large. This partnership has been particularly fruitful as it has connected the Red Cross with a large number of individuals in a densely populated, low-income area. With support from individuals, organizations, businesses and government agencies, we hope to be able to maintain and expand these types of partnerships and increase the number of Angelenos who have taken the necessary preparedness steps to be ready for an emergency. As we all know, disasters can strike at any time, without warning. While we cannot control the timing, we can work to ensure that we are as prepared as we can possibly be. If a high magnitude earthquake hits the Los Angeles region before the community is prepared, damage and loss will be far greater than if tools, partnerships, and materials are in place. An investment in community education and capacity building now will help reduce the impact of a catastrophic disaster, and will save lives.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Professional women Step Up to help underserved teen girls graduate
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

By year-end 2013 Step Up will serve at least 230 female students in grades nine through 12 in low-income and underserved neighborhoods in the city of Los Angeles who attend four of our partner Title 1 schools. Ninety percent of these students are eligible for the federal lunch program, meaning that the students and their families live at or below the federal poverty level, which is how Step Up defines low-income. The ethnic makeup of our students is 2% African-American, 7% Asian, 84% Latina, 4% multi-racial and 2% Did Not Report. In addition: • Over 85% of their primary home languages are not English. • Less than 50% of Step Up girls' parents or guardians have a high school diploma. • 98% of Step Up teens do not have a parent who attended college. We are open to all girls at our partner schools. There is no GPA requirement. Often our girls are those at the middle to bottom of the pack who lack a cohesive social group. But they have an inner drive that gets them in the door. Once in Step Up we’re able to ignite their potential. The impact of low-income, minority youth graduating high school and attending college is documented well by statistics. But what is not always captured is the ripple effect on the community. Many of our girls have younger siblings. They are acutely aware that their success models a new way of life for their family. They know that they are trailblazing in their communities and that other kids are watching. You can’t be what you can’t see. Our professional women serve as role models for our girls. The girls then serve as role models for their peer group and help set higher expectations for the next generation.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Project 10: Tithing Urban Harvests, Growing Community Food Security
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>Project 10 recognizes its place in a much larger urban sustainability movement in Los Angeles that is providing environmental, economic, and social benefits to Angelenos. Project 10 is part of the much larger urban greening, local food production, and food justice movements. By engaging powerful faith-based allies across the city in planting urban orchards, Project 10 will amplify the benefits of tree planting for food, creating positive effects that will last for decades.</p> <p>Converting the unused land from faith-based institutions into productive green space will increase urban green areas and bring about related environmental benefits. These include temperature reduction, energy conservation, a reduction in the number of smog and red alert days, improved water quality, and sequestering of greenhouse gases. In particular, there is an acute awareness of the need for more green space in low-income urban environments. In this way, Project 10’s approach can have a particularly strong effect on the health of these communities, as religious institutions are very strong players and can become a starting point for cultivating new and improving access to green spaces.</p> <p>Project 10’s other benefits result from shifting towards local sustainable food systems, as a response to food safety and food access issues, as well as national epidemics of hunger and obesity. The focus on planting urban orchards is intentional, as we assert that urban orchards can have a much more significant effect on the long-term food system than annual vegetable gardens. Once established and producing, orchards can produce food for decades, and, in the case of nut trees, can produce healthy food with high caloric value. Orchards are also significantly easier to maintain once established, need far less material (compost, mulch, plastic irrigation supplies), water, and labor than annual gardens, and many orchards will just produce food even if they are left alone for years. And Project 10 is designed to take advantage of existing gleaning networks in Los Angeles that already work on private and public orchards to provide food to local pantries.</p> <p>By 2050 we will: -Create 50 acres of new urban green space -Improve community health, particularly among the “food insecure” by adding over 23 million servings of fresh fruits and nuts to local food pantries. -Remove 4,500 tons of CO2 from the atmosphere -Reduce storm water run-off by 185 million gallons -Conserve 2.3 billion gallons of water (by converting turf and ornamentals to trees) -Improve LA’s water quality by capturing and slowing water at our institutions so it percolates into underground aquifers. -Improve the quality of life in our communities by improving food access in and around our geographically-diverse congregations, decreasing air pollution, noise, temperatures, and increasing property values. -Help reduce medical costs associated with obesity, diabetes, and smog-related diseases.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The RADAR L.A. Festival and the related programs to support L.A. performing artists will benefit Los Angeles in many ways. In addition to creating an exciting international cultural event for audiences, it also addresses two important civic issues: -The unique festival and residency programming will contribute to larger, long-term strategies to utilize cultural activity as a key way to help revitalize transitional downtown neighborhoods that have been adversely affected by difficult economic conditions. Most public and private strategies for improving the quality of life downtown focus on capital construction and physical infrastructure, while the consortium’s proposal provides a burst of relatively immediate programmatic activity, serving as a possible model for how future cultural facilities currently in the planning stage might best be utilized. -The artist-centric programs are designed to help address the crucial need for performing artists to be supported in the creation of new work with infrastructure support, financial commissions, and exposure to national/international presenters and producers. The L.A. performing arts community has been severely under-resourced compared to other major cities, and the perceived vitality of the arts community suffers as a result. Increasing artistic capacity and enhancing the quality of the work created by L.A. artists is as essential as investing in cultural facilities, yet limited funding has stifled the creation of any comprehensive civic strategies to address that issue. By giving diverse artists the resources and exposure they need, they become better equipped to participate in the transformation of a community. As the L.A. 2050 Report cites, there is a need for artists to be nurtured so that they can thrive. While the actual RADAR festival events are serving audiences and artists in many ways, it is the strategic investment in the artists themselves that produces the most enduring results for the artistic ecology of the neighborhood and the region. The consortium addresses challenges that hinder L.A. performing artists: -L.A performing artists are under-represented in the international performing arts touring field, limiting their ability to thrive. -Limited funding and infrastructure to create work and showcase it to leaders in the field, has kept L. A. artists under-recognized, with limited opportunities to tour or compete for national commissions vital to their careers. -Many playwrights, directors and choreographers believe they must leave L.A. to have a career. The vitality and reputation of the region’s artistic ecology suffers as a result. RADAR L.A. helps by commissioning diverse artists and featuring their work alongside international productions, for an audience that includes visiting producers, presenters and funders, and the international symposium prominently features L.A. artists. The success of the 2011 festival demonstrates the potential long-term positive impact that reducing thes

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
RFK-LA (Legacy in Action) Digital Archive
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

1. The RFK-LA Archive Project will amplify 21st Century learning opportunities for students throughout the LAUSD 2. Through a social justice lens, the Archive will promote connectivity between students and with the larger Los Angeles community by: • Using the social networking component of the RFK-LA Archive to engage young people in dialogues throughout the LAUSD • Introducing students to diverse and multicultural perspectives, thereby creating a more cohesive community of learners • Promoting a shared vision of social responsibility across the LAUSD student community • Chronicling the lives and stories of Los Angeles residents, for distribution on the RFK-LA Archive site • Serving as a hub for conversations with the Los Angeles community and beyond, the archives will become a “prestige” project to enhance Los Angeles’ reputation as a city of 21st Century educational excellence

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Re-Connecting L.A. Neighborhoods through Music & History
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

This project benefits not just the local neighborhoods and communities adjacent to the Regional Connector Station, but all of Los Angeles. Los Angeles has many hidden historic and cultural gems tucked away in a myriad corners of the City’s rich tapestry, created and destroyed over many iterations of land development over the decades. Our project sets to proactively preserve and celebrate this unique chapter in Los Angeles’ artistic and cultural history. <br/><br/> Without this project, the City - and future generations of Angelenos - will lose out on the opportunity to permanently memorialize the significance of this site and the incredible story of bringing communities together through music and art. Our project strives to engage not only artists, but the entire city in our activities by inviting Angelenos to share their connections with the site and to join in the celebration of this story at a launch concert or program in the fall. Even though our project will be completed in 2013, it will touch generations of train riders who embark and disembark at this station - connecting them to Los Angeles’ vibrant past and inspiring them to explore the communities around them.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Ready, Set, Gold!: A Students' Guide to a Lifetime of Fitness
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

RSG! has already benefited Los Angeles - see the results below in evaluating our project quantitatively and qualitatively. RSG! reaches approximately 500 students/school (500 x 50 schools = 25,000 annually). It serves as a continual reminder that the 42 Olympians/Paralympians participating in the program and ranging in age from 20 years old to 72 years old are healthy lifelong models for students in fighting the epidemics of diabetes and obesity because they are the examples of healthy living habits and not diabetic or obese. RSG! is a reminder of the pride people felt in 1984 when we held our second Olympics here in Los Angeles; as I travel throughout Los Angeles, those who were here in '84, always have a story to tell on their volunteering, going to an event, and no traffic! And now Mayor Villaraigosa has tossed our city hat into the ring to host another Olympics in 2024. Who wouldn't want another one after London's successfully hosting their third Olympics. And there's a young man or woman in school now who will be propelled to be an Olympian because of what is set down in LA at this time and become like Olympian David Brinton ('88--cycling) who was motivated by watching the Olympics when he was 9 years old or seeing Olympian Paul Gonzales ('84--Boxing) the first Mexican-American to win a Gold medal.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Reclaimed Park Strand Project
Reclaimed Park Strand Project 9 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

On an immediate timeline, the project will benefit the local residents by providing a public park space and a community garden. It will benefit 29th Street Elementary and Delores Huerta Elementary by provide a campus extension for the children to play, as well as create a pedestrian connection between the two. The initial benefits reflect mostly on improving environmental quality, but as the project grows, we are looking to also create a new strand for Connectivity for Angelenos. By 2050, we intend to create a pleasant rout for bicyclists and joggers from USC to the LA River, as well as children returning home from their respective schools to their home somewhere in between the two destination points.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Renewable Financing for Renewable Energy
Renewable Financing for Renewable Energy 13 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

It will create an enduring investment in renewable energy and prove a new model for solar leasing that can scale across the city and country.<p> Specifically, it will install 70kW of solar energy in the first year (7-10 households worth), and will create a revenue stream that will finance another 9kW of solar the following year. Because the investment is compounded and the total revenue grows each year, the impact compounds as well. 9kW in the first year, 10.2kW the second, 11.5kW in the third, etc. Within 6 years, the initial 70kW of solar built will have doubled to 140kW of clean energy that is saving customers on their utilities while producing financing for more projects. <p> It's a virtuous cycle where the more good we do, the more good we can do. We turn our customer's utility bill into an engine for financing renewable energy on their neighbor's roof, and that neighbor's roof, until all of the roofs are full with clean, efficient power plants. The larger we start, the sooner we can reach our goal of removing fossil fuels from our electrical grid.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

By creating a prototype for temporary summer parks on the banks of the L.A. River, River Landing will become a precedent for the entire 51 miles of the river, thus potentially alleviating immediate open-space shortages throughout the city and county. Furthermore, by creating a format by which Angelenos can reinvent how they inhabit the river, future River Landings will both galvanize public support for permanent modifications and allow us to collectively build a new vision of the river through actual use. The river will be the landmark open space improvement in Los Angeles for this century – this project both helps this happen and ensures we know exactly the kind of space we all want and need.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Roving Río Vista: A Park on the Move
Roving Río Vista: A Park on the Move 13 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>A Roving Rio Vista is just one component of a larger effort to make the L.A. River into a great Los Angeles civic space and outdoor destination. Our emerging Greenway 2020 campaign aims to make the entire L.A. River bike-able & walk-able by the year 2020. President Obama recognized the L.A. River as one of only two public spaces in California for his America's Great Outdoors initiative to champion conservation and recreation in the 21st century. A Roving Río Vista is just one of the many public amenities that could be along the L.A. River, encouraging civic engagement and connectivity.<p> Specifically, the proposed Roving Río Vista will: • Expand social connectedness and civic engagement by bringing people together in a common space • Increase community input on revitalizing the LA River – building healthy urban communities • Create active public space along the LA River • Promote the LA River Greenway 2020 campaign to create a continuous greenway for public benefit

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
S(t)imulate LA
S(t)imulate LA
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Planning and building in Los Angeles tends to be an isolated affair, where the public is engaged only when it directly affects their neighborhood. Through a fun game, we expect to reach out to a larger audience to educate them about how planning and building policy that addresses the entire city accumulates to affect broader quality of life issues. We also think the outcomes of this game, our hosted events, and the exhibition of the best scenarios will create opportunities to engage with the City of LA’s planning and building departments on the subject of zoning and development in Los Angeles. Our hope is to identify mechanisms through policy or strategic investment by these agencies that could have the greatest impact on the development of LA through 2050.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
SLAM GUN VIOLENCE
SLAM GUN VIOLENCE 30 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

At risk youth who are survivors of gun violence -- either shot themselves or lost someone to gun violence -- will be given an opportunity to channel their anger and grief into a medium, Slam Poetry, instead of channeling their anger into more violence. At the same time, Los Angeles will benefit from the artistic contributions of its youth and can become a national model for gun violence intervention.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
SOUND SHARE LA
SOUND SHARE LA 11 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Sound Share LA initiative will have a positive and lasting impact on Los Angeles by: - Educating current and future generations by providing free access to the Sound Share LA website featuring exclusive content including hundreds of interviews, performances, DJ mixes and films. - Enhancing education, research and stimulation of tourism by creating a geo-tagged content map and searchable content database, organized by musician, year, neighborhood and genre. - Increasing community awareness of the city's cultural heritage, history and value. - Providing the opportunity for residents to engage with local musicians in a live setting. - Educating listeners around the world about Los Angeles’ diverse musical contributions. The monthly community radio broadcasts will have an immediate impact within the neighborhoods where they occur. The public will come together to explore notable LA music phases in the very spaces these genres thrived. Audiences will enjoy a full day of free programming giving them rare insight into the people and places behind these influential music developments: 1950’s Central Avenue jazz scene, 1960’s Sunset Strip music revolution, 1970’s Laurel Canyon folk movement, 1980’s downtown punk rock explosion or 1990’s South Central rap uprising among many others. Oral histories from the pioneers who forged these music movements will be shared alongside input from the generations who followed in their footsteps. DJ sets and performances will bring the music genres to life. Attendees and those accessing the radio broadcasts will learn about the musical heritage of specific LA neighborhoods. This experience will educate them about truly unique music breakthroughs from Los Angeles. Eventually these radio shows will have a long term impact as they are made available as online archives. The Sound Share LA project will have a direct impact on the arts and cultural vitality of Los Angeles by creating an ongoing document of not only the past but also contemporary music made in Los Angeles. The Sound Share LA website, in combination with quality live events staged throughout Los Angeles, will expose residents to the rich heritage in every corner of our expansive city.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
START SEEING UGLY!  A social app to reveal and transform blighted parts of Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Ugly App is a tool for an ongoing program to benefit LA impacting the way the City solves problems. First, a step beyond the Neighborhood Council system, it will provide involvement of all interested citizens--even those not currently empowered to initiate change in their communities. By inviting L.A.’s citizens to assist in mapping epidemic, interstitial or “left over” sites that are eroding the fabric of the City, the START SEEING UGLY! campaign will challenge Angelenos to engage in finding solutions. It is expected that many participating citizens will be making their first step into community involvement and a sense of ownership in their neighborhood’s surroundings. If they later engage in community meetings to advocate for site remediation and/or to participate in developing public art for public awareness, an informed and engaged citizenry is in the making for Los Angeles. One significant impact could be the engagement of at-risk youth, in activity that guides them away from destructive acts and empowers them to be creative activists and stewards of their environment. This project will allow people who may have a history of disenfranchisement to engage with those that have the power to make change. By giving people a voice that is acknowledged and part of a larger effort to transform sites they helped select, trust will develop and encourage further volunteerism and stewardship Second, the resulting open source database and mapping system will be available to everyone as well as to Los Angeles organizations and agencies in both the public and private sectors, from community farmers to artists to urban planners and financial investors, to be used in the development of intervention strategies for L.A. communities. <br> Finally, START SEEING UGLY!, by design, systematically identifies parcels that denigrate the environmental, social, and economic health of L.A. neighborhoods and provides the model process that can transform them through positive social and environmental change. After generating interest and support in the transformation of “ugly” sites, M&A will work with Council Districts, the Council for Watershed Health and organizations already connected to communities where identified sites are located to embed each place with significance. In partnership with local stakeholders and citizens, landmark works of public art that inspire residents to take pride in their neighborhoods and become creatively engaged in their surroundings will be created and installed. It is expected that this effort will lead to widespread community pride, less graffiti, more vibrant places to walk and play, more activity in common areas of the neighborhood, and, thus, greater public safety. <br> This project will also leave behind a methodology and tool for collaborative investment by all stakeholders, especially underserved citizens, in improving the social and physical infrastructures of Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
STATE OF THE ART LIGHTING FOR CITY PARKS!
STATE OF THE ART LIGHTING FOR CITY PARKS! 36 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our goal with this project is to inspire the use of energy efficient lighting to improve park access and park quality throughout the City of Los Angeles. The result will be safer communities and safer public spaces. Making parks brighter and less expensive to operate allows for increased usage by the communities that are adjacent to the parks during traditionally peak crime hours. This also allows the parks to be used for further after school activities, which will help youth in underserved communities avoid gangs, drugs and the criminal behavior associated with both. Los Angeles is in desperate need of more public spaces for its youth to exercise and gather in safely, and our lights make that possible.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>The goals of STRIVERS.LA are to increase graduation rates, involve employers in their employees’ success, and help grow an educated, responsible workforce for the city of Los Angeles. This project will focus the new technology of STRIVERS.LA on students in Los Angeles, and by partnering with LACC we will engage some of the most ambitious, but also some of the lowest-income students in the LACCD. Serving residents of Los Angeles' Metro urban cluster, LACC's student population is among the most diverse in the nation. Of the College’s more than 18,000 students, 54% are immigrants to the United States and 50% are first-generation college students. Current LACC students are low-income, with 70% receiving a Board of Governors waiver for tuition and 53% receiving some form of financial aid. A number of students are even homeless and hungry. Through our partnership with LACCF, we will be able to engage directly with this population, helping to bolster the employment that most students use to support their educational goals and improving their likelihood of completing an associate’s degree or transferring to a four-year school. By increasing graduation rates and educational achievement, STRIVERS.LA will increase the number of students who go on to earn “family supportive wages," improving the overall economic health of Los Angeles. </p> <p>In addition, this will be the first public-private technology partnership initiative for LACCF, beginning opportunities for innovation partnerships focused on the advancement and success of LA’s college students.</p> <p>Using LACC's student population as proof of concept, we hope to scale our efforts to reach all campuses in the LACCD and eventually have a presence in the Cal State and UC systems as well, improving key indicators for students and graduates throughout the Los Angeles region.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Safer 'Hoods Through Arts, Action, and Community
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Every Angeleno, regardless of class, race, or zip code should have the opportunity to live in a safe neighborhood. Ensuring that all people have access to safe parks, streets, and violence-free neighborhoods creates a more unified and stronger Los Angeles. However, there are communities in our city that continue to suffer from violence and higher rates of crime. With these racial and economic disparities, we are failing as a city to ensure everyone has an equal opportunity to reach their full potential. Organizing mass based cultural events as a part of a larger community organizing strategy to address public safety benefits Los Angeles in several ways. 1. Ensuring South Los Angeles has safe neighborhoods through prevention is good for everyone. Los Angeles benefits from advancing policies and strategies that prevent crime, rather than deter through punishment in several ways. Everyone benefits from having less people in prison and leading positive lives. It saves taxpayers money and allows for greater use of resources on programs that Angelinos care about like parks and recreation, youth services, and education. By advancing community driven solutions that create safer parks, schools and libraries, we not only increase public safety, but we also tackle equity and opportunity. More students will graduate, more families will stay in the community, and more Angelinos will take advantage of the rich history, culture, and institutions South Los Angeles offers the city. 2. Large-scale cultural events in South Los Angeles promote civic engagement. Just as important as the change we create, is the way in which it is created. By believing in everyday people, developing their leadership, and creating opportunities for them to work together the best and most sustainable kind of neighborhood transformation is created. Getting people involved in the solution is a critical component to sustaining it for the long term. We seek to ensure that residents not only come to an event but also become involved in our public safety campaigns. Typically, events are one time in nature, and benefit the community for its set time. By making these events a part of an on-going organizing strategy, it moves beyond a one-time event into something meaningful throughout the year. 3. Brings positive attention to communities labeled as dangerous Many communities throughout Los Angeles regularly hold entertainment events that bring thousands of residents together and help to establish a neighborhood identity, sense of pride, and build connections among attendees. Whether it’s the Sunset Strip Music Festival, or others, these events serve to put these communities on the map, and engender positive associations and good will. Unfortunately, South Los Angeles is at a deficit when it comes to these types of events. Our events will build community ownership, promote social connectivity, and bring public attention to successful community driven efforts.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
School Based Mentoring
School Based Mentoring 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Youth who participate in the program shall improve in the following areas and therefore benefit Los Angeles. • 85% made progress in their overall school performance. • 74% participated in class more. • 58% improved their classroom behavior. • 58% had a better sense and interest in the future. • 64% developed more positive attitudes towards school. • 64% developed higher levels of self-confidence. • 80% avoid adolescent pregnancy; • 84% experience higher levels of self-esteem; • 76% do not begin using alcohol and drugs • 62% become more aware of educational and career options; and • 53% experience improved relationships with their peers and family members.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>In a recent study, obesity has cost Los Angeles County over $10 billion yearly in increased healthcare costs and reduced productivity. If the obesity epidemic continues, the impacts on our economy and health care system due to chronic diseases are dire. For children, being unhealthy will hinder them from obtaining a quality education, and eventually gainful employment and full participation in society.</p> <p>Addressing the obesity crisis directly in Los Angeles with our comprehensive School Fuel Program that will impact the nearly 650,000 LAUSD students’ health indicators such as obesity within the first 3 years of the program. If successful, the program is projected to reach 2.5 million students by 2050 based on current enrollment numbers. </p> <p>In addition, research shows that schools with high breakfast participation yield tremendous student results. Numerous independent studies show that serving students breakfast significantly improves their cognitive and mental abilities leading to increased reading and math scores. Other studies have linked breakfast to improved attendance, fewer disciplinary office referrals, fewer visits to the school nurse, and reductions in late arrivals to school, and most significantly a reduction in the likelihood of obesity and type 2 Diabetes. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Self-Sustainable Artistic Community
Self-Sustainable Artistic Community 55 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

According to the LA 2050 report, workers aged 25 and below have the highest unemployment rate of any labor force group. The experience of unemployment is one of the strongest negative impacts on subjective well-being. Once unemployed or working an entry-level position, it is a struggle to afford housing in a healthy environment. Health is compromised as affordable homes are only available in neighborhoods with heavily polluted air that may cause cancer. Time is spent working to afford the cost of living. More than half spend 30% or more to afford housing. They become disconnected from the community. The fundamental nature of human social bonds is a crucial determinant of well-being. Neighborhoods with perceived social disorder and a lack of collective efficacy are more associated with crime related outcomes.   Individuals become polarized and trapped in this cycle. They gather to live in an area but are disjointed from one another. They lack the education and skills to create a positive change for themselves. <br> ValhalLA benefits Los Angeles by creating a different cycle. <br> Houses are affordable. Earthships and Superadobe are created from recyclable materials. They have been tested, proven, and permitted in LA county. While both Earthship and Superadobe designs are revolutionary, they have not yet been integrated. This insemination promotes the recurring theme of innovation and collaboration. It involves experts in both fields and offers a long term solution to the increasing need for housing. Low material and operational costs allow homes to start at $7,000. <br> The habitat utilizes permaculture principles. Its structure has zero carbon footprint qualities and zero emission. This has immediate and large scale effects on environmental quality. <br> People are healthier with an improved environment and organic, locally grown food. <br> According to LA 2050, the current cost of living and unemployment rate place the future vitality of arts and culture at risk. Public arts expenditures are below the national average. There is a lack of arts-nurturing policy. ValhalLA members work together to give back to the city. They produce progressive art and maintain a beautiful environment. This heightens social connectivity, which, in turn, promotes public safety. Those who feel they can work with friends, family, and neighbors to bring about positive, collective change are more likely to report feeling safer. <br> ValhalLA educates others with knowledge that prepares them to change their own direct community. Others learn self-sustainable skills that enable them to seek and find employment in an emerging market with increasing demand for sustainable, low cost small business and residential buildings. <br> ValhalLA introduces an innovative concept; the functioning base for all ideas that have changed the world.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Serious Game: Los Angeles 2050 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>We expect to see a broader awareness of the specific challenges Los Angeles will face in the era of climate change, a better grasp of what each individual can do here at home, a clearer understanding of how each choice affects another, increased collaboration and communication among stakeholders, education, empowerment, participation, vision, a shift in priorities, more local vocal engagement.</p> <p>We will be able to move more quickly in deploying the critical changes necessary to adapt to a shifting climate in a timely, cost-effective way while at the same time not merely protecting but improving the livability of the city and its environmental function and quality. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Shall We Dance in LA?
Shall We Dance in LA? 12 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our dance programming will benefit Los Angeles in many ways. -We will be programming to LAUSD schools that desperately need support. We are doing this at no cost to the LAUSD or to students; -Through our projects, we are enabling communities like Sylmar, San Fernando, Arleta, and Pacoima to diversify their community-based cultural events. Two such events, the Sylmar Health and Wellness Fair and the Sylmar Olive Festival are coming up, and we are already on board in terms of providing performances and other support. -The second aspect of our proposal creates a new dance/arts festival. While this first year will, at this point, be one day long, this is only the beginning. Our focus is creating events for our students to showcase themselves and connect with their peers, community members and leaders, and dance professionals. This winter's event will have a corresponding event at the end of the spring school semester. Summer students will also have their own culminating event. Alumni of our programming will be welcome to continue in our projects and events, creating a sustaining community/family. As a small, new organization, For Learners of All Ages is using these events to create and support more programming and public activities across the 10 communities we are pledged to serve: Sylmar, San Fernando, Pacoima, Lake View Terrace, Sunland, Tujunga, North Hills, Mission Hills, Panorama City, and Arleta. Our activities will also serve as a model for other parts of the San Fernando Valley, and the city and county of Los Angeles, creating sustainable, duplicatable programming with documented, peer-reviewed results that translate on school records, greater and broader cultural and business activity, and overall community value.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Shared Housing Helps Los Angeles Become a National Model!
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

LA’s future as a thriving metropolis relies on providing a housing supply that supports individual stability, keeps people connected to the places where they live, and makes communities more vibrant, diverse and supportive. Shared housing does this by capturing the inventory of available units, rather than relying solely on the production of new units. A staggering 73% of low-income homeowners and 93% of low-income renters spend more than 30% of their income on housing. By pursuing shared housing as a strategy to address affordability challenges, the project will close the gap between inadequate income and the high cost of housing. In 2012, individuals enrolled in ALA’s shared housing program reduced their rents costs by an average of 50%. Moreover, Los Angeles sets trends for the rest of the nation. With a strong shared housing program, we have the opportunity to become a national model for integration - rather than marginalization - of vulnerable populations.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Sister Blocks
Sister Blocks
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

It would, in simple hands-on fashion, create a connectivity in Los Angeles that would be felt everywhere and cost next to nothing.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Skid Row 2050
Skid Row 2050 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The goal of the project is to create an inclusive and consensus-based model for healthy community development. We plan to develop policy suggestions and design possibilities of the built environment in Skid Row, transforming the lowest-income area of Los Angeles. Additionally, we want the existing population in Skid Row to have a vested interest in their community and increase a sense of ownership and buy-in for the area. <br/><br/> The ultimate goal of this project is to create a living product that creates an infrastructure for development and inclusion that fosters growth and transformation in the area. This community plan will raise awareness to a part of Los Angeles that has constantly been swept under the rug. This project will bring attention to a problem that is often marginalized and seen as someone else’s problem thus perpetuating the social injustice. By bringing homelessness and the lack of affordable housing to the forefront, we can begin a dialog that puts the most vulnerable at the center of the conversation. The Downtown Renaissance has never included Skid Row; this is an opportunity to make sure it does not continue to be left out of the conversation. <br/><br/> We aim to expand the dialog around the impact and possibilities of housing. Rather than just defined as a roof over one’s head, we hope to activate and push the performative aspects of housing. We want to redefine housing as intentional components of daily life that have been thoughtfully designed, developed, and operated. We strive to serve as an example of how housing and the built environment can transform lives and be an active part of the fabric and identity of Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Slake: Los Angeles
Slake: Los Angeles 19 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles, the gateway to Latin America and the Pacific Rim is criminally disadvantaged when it comes to disseminating and distributing the work of its artists, writers and intellectuals. This is primarily the means of production (and locus of prejudice towards Los Angeles) in publishing remain in New York. In it's brief history, Slake: Los Angeles, A City and its Stories, has competed with the best journalis in the world and won. Slake has been honored by press clubs, Pen Center, Livingston Awards, Franco American Foundation, and the prestigious Best Of American series five times (in two eligible issues). This is a remarkable feat and it's been accomplished because nobody know and can harness LA's talent better than Slake and its editors, Joe Donnelly and Laurie Ochoa. Los Angeles needs and deserves a prominent voice and forumn for its creative and intellectual talent to present to the world. Los Angeles is critical to the 21st Century, the privileges and problems of which will unfurl in LA first.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Smart Growth for All: Affordable Housing Near Public Transit
Smart Growth for All: Affordable Housing Near Public Transit 12 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project will use legal and policy tools to help lift up the voices of residents and community organizations engaged in planning for transit-oriented development in Los Angeles. If the process of developing TOD plans meaningfully incorporates such voices, those plans will result in documented benefits of equitable TOD, including affordable housing for residents with low income around major transit stops; increased community access to jobs, healthcare, and fresh food; increased public transportation ridership; increased public investment and economic activity; and reduced traffic congestion, greenhouse gas emissions, and commuting times. Most of all, as Los Angeles develops its transit infrastructure, it will do so in a manner that allows it to retain its socio-economic, racial, and cultural diversity, and that does not push out existing communities and residents. A number of affordable housing advocates and community-based organizations have sought our legal assistance in influencing local TOD planning processes and in advancing affordable housing and anti-displacement policies near transit in South and East LA. Particularly after our success in achieving innovative policies to advance affordable housing and economic development in the Cornfields Arroyo, there is great momentum to achieve similar innovations in other local plans and in citywide planning processes. Specifically, through this project: • Organizations working to advance affordable housing near transit will have legal tools and increased capacity to shape the development of their neighborhoods; • The views of community-based organizations serving low-income people in Los Angeles will be represented in TOD planning processes; and • Proposed California transit legislation will contain language that supports low-income communities.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Smartphone App for Civic Crime Reporting
Smartphone App for Civic Crime Reporting
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

CitySourced Crime Reporter will make it easier for citizens to report crime to the appropriate parties for better response from law enforcement groups. We also believe that increasing the visibility of what crime is happening and where, will make it easier for policy makers to come up with targeted data driven policy and for Angelenos to be informed voters on crime prevention policy.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

URBAN TxT’s hacker space will benefit Los Angeles by creating an innovation hub in one of the areas with the highest number of youths and the lowest number of educational opportunities. The open access to technology and educational resources will keep kids off the street while arming them with the skills they actually need to not just survive, but excel in life. An innovation center that doubles as a technological sanctuary will make our younger generations more appealing to future employees, prepare them to be the best professionals in LA, and more importantly, give them the business and technology skills so that they can start their own ventures. Detention rooms in our South Los Angeles high schools are filled with African American and Latino males. High incarceration and dropout rates plague male students in South Los Angeles as on average 54% of them will not graduate high school. Those who graduate school are often times unprepared to enter the workforce. This creates a growing skills gap for STEM positions in which demand outweighs the supply of a skilled workforce, especially in South LA. URBAN TxT’s hacker space tackles the root issues and turns what is now a weakness into a strength. The hacker space is part of a larger vision that will turn LA into the breeding ground for the next wave of innovators and visionaries of the world. By giving a person of any age, background, ethnicity or religion the skills to innovate and a safe place to do so, we unleash vast amounts of untapped potential that would have otherwise been wasted. URBAN TxT’s hacker space will be the catalyst that will turn a poverty stricken, gang infested and crime riddled area into a case study for what could be if the right people assets and capital were in place. The hacker space will spark a movement towards more collaboration in learning, innovative use of resources and spaces to drive new ideas and a dedication to education and personal growth unlike anything the city has seen before. A technology driven community space like URBAN TxT’s hacker space will open up a world of opportunities to all members of the community. This space will encourage everyone to innovate, use its resources to find job opportunities and online educational programs and to discover what the world has to offer through technology. The hacker space will spark more than just our youths, it will spark unity and forward thinking within an area that continues to fall behind the rest of the city and the country. Community members will be encouraged to take advantage of free online classes through programs like iTunes U while connecting with people all over the world with software like Skype of Google+ Hangouts. The benefits of URBAN TxT's hacker space go well past South LA. The organization will create a team of ambassadors to share knowledge and the vision for technology and education merging together. The team will share findings with the city, while inviting everyone to be a part of it.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Speak Up When You're Down: Maternal Mental Health Improvement Project
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Perinatal or maternal depression encompasses a range of mood disorders that can affect a woman during pregnancy and around the time of birth. Mothers who suffer from perinatal depression are at-risk of delivering a pre-term baby, a low-birth weight baby and/or a baby with elevated stress hormones. They are also less likely breastfeed, use car seats, electrical outlet covers or smoke detectors, place her baby on his/her back to sleep, or talk, play or show books to her baby on a daily basis. A mother suffering from postpartum depression is also more likely to abuse drugs and/or alcohol, display anger and disengagement with her baby and use corporal punishment. Children of women who are suffering from perinatal depression may display poor weight gain, low self-esteem and behavioral problems. Most importantly, depression in the postpartum period interrupts healthy bonding between mother and child, leading to impaired cognitive, behavioral, and emotional development in early childhood and beyond. Of the approximately 150,000 live births occurring in Los Angeles County each year, over 22,000 women experience clinical perinatal depression. Women who live in disadvantaged populations are particularly susceptible. Recent studies have demonstrated that in households below the federal poverty threshold, as many as one in four mothers of infants is experiencing moderate to severe levels of depressive symptoms. The most recent Los Angeles Mother Baby (LAMB) Survey results identified close to 40% of Hispanic and African-American women as experiencing some degree of perinatal depression. Highly treatable and often preventable, perinatal depression and related mood disorders are often not diagnosed and/or treated due to lack of screening and inaccessibility of informed treatment. In fact, 19 percent of women in Los Angeles rate their mental health as fair or poor during their pregnancy, yet 42 percent of new mothers were not asked about feeling depressed during their hospital stays, well baby appointments or 6 weeks postpartum check ups. Through its Speak Up When You're Down: Maternal Mental Health Improvement Project, the Los Angeles County Perinatal Mental Health Task Force will increase awareness of maternal depression and its impact on the mother, child, family and community at large amongst pregnant and postpartum women, health care and community providers and county policy makers. As a result, by 2050 all pregnant and postpartum women will be screened for maternal depression during their prenatal visits and postpartum check up and all women who are high-risk for maternal depression will receive treatment.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Only 25% of participants in most job training programs increase their annual wages (Jobs for the Future). Over 85% of Streetcraft youth triple their annual income. Within five years Streetcraft will spread this impact throughout Los Angeles county, becoming a countywide initiative with retail hubs in 20 locations working with over 20,000 young people a year. These retail hubs will house our engagement programming, apprenticeships, and provide a commercial marketplace for products designed by streetcraft artists as well as engage 1000 students a year. Our engagement programming will reduce graffiti and illicit street enterprises; the apprenticeship program will increase youth’s annual income and provide concrete technical skills and work experience; and the micro venture program will increase the annual income of students by 50%. Finally, communities where streetcraft hubs are located will see youth unemployment decrease by 5%.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Student Eco Riders
Student Eco Riders 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Transit is expanding in LA County thanks to voter-approved Measure R. We’ll get seven new light rail, subway and bus rapid transit lines over the next 30 years – or possibly sooner if our efforts to accelerate the construction are successful. Building ridership for the bigger and better transit is key to getting the environmental benefits we’re after. Santa Monica College’s efforts are producing concrete results. A traffic study from 2010 found that whopping 40% of Santa Monica College's 34,000 students and 1,800 staff used the bus to get to campus in the morning. That’s huge when you consider that in LA County less than 7% of people use transit to get to work now. In 2009, LA Community College District offered a deeply discounted transit pass to students ($15 for 6 months) and students took nearly six million transit trips that year and reduced VMT (vehicle miles traveled) by 42 million miles and CO2 emissions by 36 tons. That’s the kind of impact we need to address climate change. In San Bernardino County, Omnitrans estimates that student ridership has risen from less than 5% to over 20% following a pilot program with free transit passes. College students are the ideal group to win over to transit for several reasons. First, they are a significant part of the population, in fact, over the next decade about 10% of LA County residents will be enrolled in community colleges alone. And students are more mobile, more open to trying new things, more environmentally conscious, and more creative when it comes to stretching their limited budgets. Learning to take transit, or experimenting with living “car-light” makes a lot more sense to college students than it does to the general public.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Student Health = Student Success. Improving student health and readiness to learn in LA
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Every day more than 680,000 children attend school in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Many of our students have little or no access to essential preventive and primary health care. In some classrooms, one in three students are obese and are already on the path towards chronic health care conditions such as diabetes or heart disease. In some classrooms, one or two students will develop Type 2 diabetes before graduation and four teenage girls will contract a sexually transmitted infection. One in three young women in LA will have an unplanned pregnancy before their 20th birthday and many of them will drop out of school as a result. We know, and the research confirms this, that kids that are healthy are better able to learn and achieve academic success. The Wellness Networks provide a launching pad for a range of public health interventions in the schools to address these serious issues and improve children’s health and community health outcomes. Wellness Networks use a community-based approach and strategies to address health concerns. Research has shown that school-based strategies are effective in improving health and student readiness to learn. Place-based approaches call for engaging the community where people live, work, learn and play to understand their resources, identify their needs and engage them in culturally appropriate ways. Through the Wellness Networks and using evidence-based strategies, The LA Trust, in partnership with LAUSD and other key allies, is working to: - Increase access to preventive and primary health care services - Improve access to dental care for children by bringing in mobile dental clinics for preventive screenings, cleanings and treatment - Engage communities in healthy living Improved access to health information, health promotion interventions, and health care services will have a positive impact on the students and the overall health of the community. The long-term goals The LA Trust seeks to achieve improve student academic outcomes and population health over the next five to seven years, achieving outcomes such as: - All students are career and college ready (in line with District goals) - Decrease chlamydia and teen pregnancy rates - Decrease overweight and obesity rates - Increase insurance enrollment - Improved asthma management

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

According to a 2012 article in the Huffington Post, “more than 51,000 homeless people live in Los Angeles County, from Antelope Valley to the South Bay, with double-digit percentage increases in the number of families, seniors and veterans over last year.” The LA2050 website quotes that “Los Angeles is considered the ‘homeless capital of the country.’” Swipes for the Homeless is especially prominent and beneficial in Los Angeles because of two main reasons. Firstly, the statistics tell all – there is a strong need for support and services for the local homeless population. With such a large homeless population and shelters lacking in resources, every act of giving and every helping hand counts. We hope that Swipes for the Homeless has helped – and will continue to – alleviate the strain on homeless shelters and missions in Los Angeles. In addition, Swipes for the Homeless has two very strong chapters that are based in Los Angeles – UCLA and USC. UCLA is our oldest and most established chapter, with a fully self-sufficient and independent team that runs smoothly every quarter. USC is a relatively newer chapter, but during their first donation drive in Fall 2012 the Trojans managed to collect 2,300 pounds of food! Despite the friendly rivalry between both schools, here is a wonderful example where students from rival universities can work together for a greater cause. Combined, our UCLA and USC chapters prove to be a strong force that is united in its mission to fight homelessness in Los Angeles and its surrounding areas.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Sustainable Works Presents Dr. Keeling’s Curve
Sustainable Works Presents Dr. Keeling’s Curve
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

By telling the story of climate change in the form of a provocative play, starring a well known and respected actor, we will reach thousands of people who might otherwise not have been exposed to this crucial information.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
THE i.am.angel EAST L.A. INCUBATOR PROJECT
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

An East LA incubator project will benefit ALL of Los Angeles, not just the east side. Here’s WHY: - Our incubator program creates a better overall startup ecosystem for the entire city of Los Angeles, by creating a LARGER and more DIVERSE pool of entrepreneurial talent. The future needs solutions that involve EVERYONE. - Our incubator program will foster entrepreneurship in struggling communities that are often burdened with crime, violence, and unemployment. By providing education and opportunity, we will enable people to start successful legitimate businesses, or gain the high-demand and high-paying skills needed to work in tech, rather than doing illegal things. This has a halo effect on so many other factors. Not only could it boost the local economy, creating jobs for local young people, but they will also be more likely to stay in the neighborhoods and continue to improve them. It could reduce crime and violence, and increase safety in these struggling neighborhoods and surrounding areas. The East LA incubator program can serve as a model for other similar communities around the world. - Our incubator program will give seed funding, supporting the creation of startups that provide value to the local community, especially those focusing on social good. Our project could be funding the future hottest LA startups promoting arts & cultural vitality, education, environmental quality, health, housing, income & employment, public safety, and social connectedness.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
TRUST South LA 2050: Affordable Homes, Sustainable Neighborhoods
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles defines urban sprawl, with hundreds of miles of roads and freeways that have shaped the City over the past five decades. We all recognize that it is time to rethink, replan, and rebuild Los Angeles to be more compact and less dependent on cars. However, one of the challenges to this vision of smart growth is the many thousands of acres of single-family neighborhoods scattered throughout the City, which do not have lots that can accommodate multi-family housing. TRUST South LA is developing an affordable housing prototype for more families to comfortably live in these types of low-density residential neighborhoods – starting in our own South LA backyards. Furthermore, our model for single family affordable housing will require minimal government subsidy, which is critical in a time of reduced resources, creating the potential for large scale replication even during these lean times. With funding from LA2050, this demonstration project will provide an effective advocacy tool, as TRUST South LA and others pursue the capital subsidies from public and private sources necessary to implement this cost-effective housing model. As a unique concept, TRUST South LA’s model creates affordability by acquiring properties discounted through the foreclosure process, and then doubling density to decrease the land cost per unit – essentially cutting our land cost in half for each home. Utilizing a mix of rehabilitation and manufactured homes, we can deliver the finished units for $175,000 per home – which is approximately HALF the cost of new multi-family construction. TRUST South LA will create permanent affordable housing – on land held in perpetuity by the community through our land trust – for 50% of what it currently costs to construct permanently affordable rental units! With a successful demonstration project, we can transform our City’s approach to creating affordable housing in low-density neighborhoods. Additionally, our long-term goal is to create scattered-site limited equity housing cooperatives held on our community land trust, providing resident-control and resident-ownership with long-term affordability. Unlike affordable for-sale developments that lose their affordability after a subsidized homeowner sells, community land trusts circumvent the loss of that initial subsidy through community ownership of the land, which passes the benefits onto future generations. Initially, until the limited equity coop model becomes feasible through increased subsidy sources and by taking the model to scale, we will provide rental housing under the ownership of our member-controlled non-profit. Finally, as we keep families in their neighborhoods - and create good bike, pedestrian and public transportation infrastructure in those neighborhoods - we get more Angelinos out of their cars and into the streets. This means less greenhouse gas emissions, lower obesity rates, safer streets, and more connected communities throughout LA.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Teachers Leading from the Classroom
Teachers Leading from the Classroom 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Three factors make our work particularly impactful in Los Angeles. First, we are providing a safe space for teachers to learn about education policy and talk about the challenges and best practices in their schools. By engaging individual and groups of teachers during and after school, we have been able to hear from thousands of classroom teachers in hundreds of schools in Los Angeles. Second, we recognize the power of teachers, but also understand the power of building a broad network of teachers, parents, community leaders and policy makers. We break down the barriers that all too often separate parents from teachers or policy makers from classroom practitioners. Through our forums, teachers network with policy makers. We are also part of three local and state coalitions that bring parent groups, faith groups, civil rights groups and community organizations to ensure elected, district and union leaders hear the ideas of solutions-oriented teachers. Most importantly, we believe in the power of teachers taking collective action on behalf of our students. As elected and district leaders call for specific policy reforms, our members have been able to ensure that those leaders hear the voices and policy ideas of teachers who understand the needs of our students, the concerns of their peers and the implications of policy on school communities. Our members have presented research-based policy ideas to school board members, union leaders, state legislators, media and civic leaders. They have sent their voices to the California Supreme Court, Sacramento legislature as well as their district and media.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The A LOT Initiative: Using Art to Activate Vacant City Lots
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Arts Council for Long Beach and its partners have embarked on a unique, initiative that blends arts participation with community redevelopment. The A LOT Initiative will improve the vitality of traditionally underserved neighborhood and enliven the areas through arts participation. A LOT encourages the presence and participation in cultural opportunities by bringing art into communities. It furthers support of cultural participation by creating art opportunities in areas where previously there was limited to no access to the arts. A LOT allows new audiences to experience art in their neighborhood. While the current structure and focus of the initiative is on underserved neighborhoods and residents in the Long Beach area, the project's concepts can be applied throughout the region.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Beacon Network, presented by Jovenes, Inc.
The Beacon Network, presented by Jovenes, Inc. 4 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

As beacons are guides that steer wayward ships into shore, non-profits and social service agencies help our clients overcome the obstacles they face on a daily basis. The Beacon Network online resource directory provides an easy, efficient way for youth and others in need to find resources - housing, job training, educational opportunities, legal assistance, after school activities - without the need for a case manager. We believe that this fosters independence and a sense of control. In addition, the system can be used by caseworkers to quickly find a complete list of opportunities for their clients. We see that many organizations, despite being geographic neighbors, are not connected with each other and need ways to share information about available programs, resources, and events to each other’s clients. By adding web-based tools that target both the youth of our community and the agencies that serve them, we have an opportunity to increase the level of communication across agency lines and improve our shared neighborhoods. The project would increase usage of TBN and engage homeless youth. Homeless youth are one of the most socially disconnected sub-populations in the city, yet everyday we hear our youth say they want ways to give back to the community. We believe by creating leadership and developmental opportunities that are combined with the promotion of TBN, we are able create an empowering experience for youth that also provides them with marketable skills. Expanding TBN would benefit Los Angeles in the following ways: 1) Increase access to vital resources in high-need communities. 2) Provide training and leadership opportunities for homeless youth. 3) Provide a replicable, tech-based model for other areas of LA to create neighborhood based solutions and connections. 4) Continue building and strengthening the lines of communication between non-profit organizations and provide the best combination of service and care for a community in need.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Big Draw LA
The Big Draw LA 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

By using both traditional and non-traditional venues such as parks, public libraries, community centers, city streets, parking lots, theaters and train stations, we are able to reach underserved Los Angeles populations that may not seek or view art in their day-to-day activities, and engage them in the act of creation. Participating in art making and cultural activities leads to a stronger community and enhances human development at the individual level. As before, we expect that numerous museums, schools, cultural organizations, galleries, and even retail outlets will participate this October in The Big Draw LA. By having all the events marketed jointly, participants who participate in an event in their own neighborhoods first may be enticed to visit an unfamiliar venue for another event later in the month. By further diversifying the array of presenting venues, we want to be sure there are drawing events close to residents from across the Los Angeles region. While one may not expect to see a drawing activity at a park or on a local street during daily activities (commuting through a transit station, a weekend shopping day, a race or other sports activity, a farmers market), its ease of access may encourage people to stop and participate. The benefits of unique sites can work both ways. Our organization would like the extra resources to provide all art materials, resource guides, and other public awareness materials to our Los Angeles partners—making it as easy and accessible as possible for a traditional or non-traditional venue to host a Big Draw LA event for their surrounding communities. For many people, the notion of drawing can be intimidating. Most do not consider themselves to be artists; yet we know that drawing is something rewarding everyone can do. The informality of the highly participatory experiences, the familiarity of the venues, and the thoughtful planning of the presenters fosters a positive experience. In our previous three years of BDLA, we found that many participants simply discovered our flagship “Make Your Mark in the Park” event while walking through Exposition Park or Grand Park to get somewhere else. These people stayed and seemed delighted to have discovered the opportunity to “get back to drawing,” and were willing to not just watch their children draw, but to draw with them, and happily took a sketchbook to “do more” as they left. By bringing activities close to home, and in many cases, integrated as an extension of other activities the family is already engaged with, it is more likely that they will choose to participate, and feel it was a fulfilling experience worth repeating. We hope that this will bring active participation in cultural and artistic activities to the many pockets of the Los Angeles area.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The CITYstage Arts Discovery Project
The CITYstage Arts Discovery Project 6 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

A diversity of LA’s stakeholders stand to benefit from the CITYstage Arts Discovery Project including inner-city youth, LAUSD schools, local artists, professional artists and venues, arts non-profits and the local community. Below outlines the specific benefits each group would acquire along with a list of advantages gained from their participation. Inner-city youth would gain: opportunities to participate in and contribute to the cultural landscape of LA; chances to explore and develop their creative mind; access to after-school arts programs that provide safe and productive environments; pathways and possibilities for success in the future including higher education and careers in the arts and other creative industries. LAUSD middle and high schools would benefit from: outside resources to address the lack of comprehensive arts programming in public schools; improved academic achievement, student retention and graduation rates; solid research to build the case for lasting policy and curriculum change in support of the arts in schools. Local artists would gain: a venue for sharing their talent and art; a supportive space for experimentation, growth and development of their craft; free event marketing resources for greater visibility of up-and-coming artists; financial support for their participation. Professional artists and arts venues would benefit in the following ways: growth of a new generation of young audience members to sustain future support; access to previously untapped markets (inner-city youth and the under-served communities of LA); direct financial support to metropolitan arts/cultural venues with an additional 450 attendees per year; opportunities to make the “formal” concert arts more accessible to our youth in the form of discount group tickets, “talkbacks” with youth after performances, “sneak-peeks” into rehearsals, guest lectures, and artist workshops. Arts non-profits would gain: opportunities to collaborate with other non-profit arts providers that will strengthen youth arts programs across the county; a model for collaboration between local arts programs. The LA community, as a whole, will benefit from: weekly opportunities to participate in free classes and performances that celebrate the diversity of LA; a stronger business climate due to the growth of creative industries; a better-informed, connected and engaged citizenry; the development of a more vibrant and inclusive arts community; a public mandate for greater arts support in schools and the community. In order to change the future of Los Angeles and further enrich the arts and cultural vitality of the city, projects like CITYstage Arts Discovery need to engage all members of our community-regardless of race, income or geography. It is through this inclusive approach that we will see continued growth into 2050 and beyond, ensuring Los Angeles as a model and leader in sustained arts and cultural vitality.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Caine's Arcade Challenge
The Caine's Arcade Challenge 154 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

We envision a city in which creativity is a core social value and a critical skill developed in every child; where the innate passion, curiosity and creativity of children is nurtured in schools, homes and communities everywhere; where all children are taught to be creative thinkers and doers, and encouraged to make their very best ideas happen in the world. The Caine’s Arcade Challenge will celebrate and develop the creativity and social entrepreneurship of children on a grand scale throughout the Southland. The Challenge will also showcase the role adults can play in fostering these traits. Specifically, the Challenge will engage 10,000 children, 500 teachers, 100 schools, building over 100 cardboard arcades, and raising over $25,000 for local charitable causes. Student participants will become more creative, more entrepreneurial and more empathetic. Teacher participants will become more proficient at project-based learning and more networked to each other locally and globally. Other adult participants who attend events on the Day of Play will learn about the simple things they can do to foster creativity in children. The scale of the event will raise public awareness about the value of creativity. Over the course of the Challenge, project-based learning and social entrepreneurship will proliferate throughout the city. A website designed for the Challenge will capture content from the various participants: photos, videos, lesson plans, activity kits, blogs and other content will showcase the ingenuity of students and their teachers, and become sources for inspiration and the mass proliferation of project-based learning beyond the scope of the Challenge itself.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Connections Program
The Connections Program 20 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Studies show that students tend to drop out of college because their expectations—academic, social, or both—don’t match up with the reality of college life. Ill-prepared students also suffer from lack of motivation, inadequate preparation, and poor study skills. The National Center for Education Statistics indicates that dropout rates are particularly high for African American and Hispanic students. Other student populations at greater risk of dropping out include those who are the first in their family to attend college, and those who have limited English proficiency. The Connections Program aims to reverse this trend among those at-risk students in our city, and remove any potential barriers they may face as they prepare themselves - academically, financially, and emotionally – for college life. Students in Los Angeles could benefit greatly from the Connections Program. Although the high school dropout rate for LA Unified improved slightly last year, the graduation rate dipped. According to the California Department of Education, 61.6% of LAUSD's Class of 2011 received their diplomas, compared with 62.4% who graduated in 2010. “…At the rate California is going, it will take us 13 years to close the graduation gap between Latino and African American students and their white peers,” said Arun Ramanathan, executive director of Oakland-based Education Trust-West. "It’s time we stopped talking about this problem and invested in the strategies that top districts and schools are using to fix it.” The Connections Program aims to fix the graduation gap between low-income and minority students and their more affluent peers by offering comprehensive support services to our students during their time at Bright Star Schools. Most Bright Star students enter our schools lagging behind their more affluent and white peers. Connectors meet with the same students for up to six years to provide consistent support and guidance, build trust and familiarity with their families, and work with those adults in their student’s life (teachers, counselors, parents, coaches, etc.) to coordinate services. Students establish strong bonds with their Connectors that help develop confidence and give them the encouragement needed to achieve their goals. Through this program, we are preventing any student from falling through the cracks of the educational system and ensuring that they fully prepared - academically, emotionally, and financially – to attend a four-year university and enter the 21st Century workplace. Since its inception, the Connections Program has proven to be an effective strategy that increases academic success among students of color and removes those obstacles that prevent college enrollment and graduation.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The County Resident from District 3
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>The internet and 24/7 access to media and better information than ever will allow for a better informed citizenry, better suited to monitor its precious government resources. Corruption can never thrive in an environment where the sun is shining and the 'fresh-eyes' of the public are asking questions and getting answers. </p> <p>Scrutiny is teachable. </p> <p>Inspiring young and old to be more civically engaged through comedy and straight talk. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Reduce Food System Environmental Impacts: Through their commitment to purchase at least 15% of annual food purchases from sustainable and local sources, LA institutions will contribute to our region’s environmental sustainability targets by reducing chemical inputs (such as pesticides and fertilizer) and food miles. Institutions are also encouraged to reduce meat consumption—a key strategy for improving public health and sustainability—as livestock farming is one of the most significant sources of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Influence Food Production Decisions: Increased demand for fairly and sustainably produced food from large institutional purchasers will encourage LA area farmers to shift towards more environmentally and socially sustainable growing practices. With more institutions adopting GFPP, we will provide market opportunities for farms that decrease or eliminate chemical inputs; avoid the use of hormones and antibiotics; conserve land, soil, and water; protect and enhance biodiversity; and reduce on-farm energy consumption and GHG emissions. Strengthen the LA Regional Food Infrastructure: We will build market relationships between GFPP purchasers and GFPP producers by working with partners to establish a LA Regional Food Hub. A food hub, supported by regular institutional demand, will provide necessary infrastructure to scale up the supply of local Good Food and make wholesome Good Food options affordable in small neighborhood markets in underserved LA neighborhoods. Climate Change Adaptability: Locally produced and sustainably harvested produce and fish ensure food security by avoiding disruptions in the supply chain or lapses in quality control. Moreover, a region that can generate its own food is less susceptible to fluctuations in the national and global food supply. It is also important for us to ensure that everyone living in the LA region has access to Good Food. LAUSD is a vital part of this goal. As the second largest school district in the country, they provide lunch to 650,000 students daily, 80% of whom receive free or reduced meals. Additionally, City government facilities reach at least 100,000 residents daily, through nutrition programs, employee cafeterias, and concessionaires. We will also work with universities and hospitals to expand GFPP. GFPP will ensure increased access to fresh, high quality local food to those who need it most. Create Local Jobs: Rebuilding our regional food system can create good, local jobs throughout the food chain—in food production, processing, distribution, food service, and waste. A localized food system can greatly benefit the LA economy because small, local farms, suppliers, and their employees are more likely to spend income locally, re-circulating 2 to 4 times the capital they spend. For example, through LAUSD’s GFPP commitment, local farmers, processors, warehouses, distributors and workers could receive at least $13 million annually.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The HeArt Project: Arts Education ends the Dropout Crisis in LA
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

HP is one of the only arts organizations in L.A. that works exclusively with alternative high school students. Students attend alternative high schools (continuation and community day schools) for reasons including failing grades and behavioral problems, teen pregnancy/parenting, gang involvement, expulsion from their home school districts, or prior incarceration. Most are low-income minorities, and all are at high risk of dropping out for good. Our students have experienced high levels of transience and failure, perceive a lack of future possibilities, and have difficulty recognizing the value of their contributions and connection to others. As a result they are often unable to envision a future where they embark on fulfilling careers, feel a meaningful connection to their community, or identify and pursue substantive goals. We have witnessed through the years -- and research in the field supports our experience -- that the arts are a particularly effective mechanism to inspire hard-to-reach youth. Many HP students are part of rampant cycles of poverty, gang involvement and violence that perpetuate themselves within their families and communities. HP helps students help themselves and chart a new course in life. HP students connect with professional mentors, contribute to a positive peer network, graduate high school, and pursue substantive goals. By investing in their own potential, these teenagers transform into fulfilled and responsible adults with a stake in their communities. HP’s work is significantly underscored by a major report just recently released from the National Endowment for the Arts, “Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth” (2012), which compiles findings from four longitudinal studies. One example from the study is that in two separate databases, students who had arts-rich experiences in high school showed higher overall GPAs than did students who lacked those experiences. And further, high school students who earned few or no arts credits were five times more likely not to have graduated than students who earned many arts credits. This significant effect of the arts on the graduation rate of at-risk teenagers mirrors what we have witnessed in our 20 years of service.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Giving 200 leaders of the LA2050 initiative a potent tool for dealing with stress and actualizing their highest potential will translate to more creative solutions, more effective programs, and more profound results.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Los Angeles Giant Harp Project 8 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Giant Harp Project is extremely unique. It celebrates the temporal transformation of Los Angeles architecture, along with providing world class entertainment for free. This project makes arts education accessible to all through workshops designed to engage multiple communities regardless of their age and physical or mental abilities. Because String Theory has been celebrated by the finest venues of LA, the city has already embraced the phenomena of the Giant Harp. However, it has not been accessible to people without the means to buy tickets to the shows. Artists for Literacy and String Theory are excited to partner with Los Angeles in pioneering the effort to bridge the gap between artists and audience. Without compromising artistic integrity, The Giant Harp Project, believes that the integration of work created by the public (via our workshops) can fortify the actual performance of String Theory and honor the collaborative potential between artist and audience. At its core, this process is about engagement and discovery by both the artists and audiences at a profound level. We also believe that the Giant Harp Project is coming at a time when LA is going through tremendous transformations at the community level. When choosing the 3 neighborhoods for our residencies in 2013, we have the opportunity to lend a hand to community stakeholders who are ushering in these changes. For example, the 6th Street Viaduct / Bridge project won’t begin until 2015. The Boyle heights communities impacted by the project have a 100 year history of the bridge to celebrate before it’s torn down. Our Giant Harp Project can speak to that legacy on several levels and also serve a community that is in dire need of an arts infusion. Another location that is compelling to us is the 5 mile radius of the Magnolia Place Community Initiative. They are engaging more than 70 county, city and community organization to bring over 5000 families a comprehensive health and education overhaul. Their innovative coalition has room for a residency like ours to invigoration the public’s excitement and participation around this initiative. Our residency will include grassroots outreach into the communities before hand so that we don’t just come and go without making a true and lasting impact. As proof of concept, Artists for Literacy was funded by the California State Library in 2005 to do a similar project, not with art, but with the celebration of free literacy projects. The advocacy campaign was very successful and those best practices will be used for this project. We also believe in the serendipity of being exposed to the arts and what transforms in people. The Giant Harp Project is designed to inspire the inner artist in everybody. Over the past 10 years, String Theory has proven this theory to be true. Countless people who have participated in our workshops have embraced and accessed an artistic part of themselves.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Los Angeles Service Academy
The Los Angeles Service Academy 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>LASA inspires young people to think about their region and their future and how these are intertwined. We aim to foster ties of community and connection between diverse groups of teenagers as we collectively explore how greater Los Angeles works. Along the way, we will offer assistance to those students by way of collegiate counseling and mentoring internships across the basin. Our LASA graduates will have foundational understanding of Los Angeles history and institutions as they move on in their education and into career paths. By maintaining connections to one another and to what we learn together, LASA students and graduates will create new and lasting ties across region and background, ties which we hope will grow as LASA grows and as our student participants move into positions of public service in their lives and careers.</p> <p>LASA aims to change the lives of its student participants and, in so doing, change the future of Los Angeles for the better.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Million Reusable Bag Giveaway
The Million Reusable Bag Giveaway 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

BUILD EMPLOYMENT AMONG AT-RISK COMMUNITIES Both Green Vets LA and Homeboy Industries provide good jobs in a supportive atmosphere to at-risk communities which need strong support. The Million Bag Giveaway pilot project will provide predictable workflow for both companies to make 25,000 reusable bags for 3 months as California Greenworks raises funds toward the eventual goal of giving away 4 million reusable bags, one for each resident of the City of Los Angeles. A fully-funded order for 4 million bags will then provide financial backing to create a stronger infrastructure for both companies to increase hiring from these two worthy at-risk communities, so that they might build out their reusable bag manufacturing infrastructure and prepare them to fill more orders in the future as plastic bag ban trend spreads from city to city across the United States. PROVIDE FREE REUSABLE GROCERY BAGS TO LOWER-INCOME COMMUNITIES AS PLASTIC BAGS ARE PHASED OUT The Million Bag Giveaway pilot project builds upon the environmental success of the City’s ban on single-use plastic bags by providing, free of charge, reusable bags for lower-income residents, so that everyone can celebrate the success of cleaning blight out of our neighborhoods and waste out of our rivers and oceans without being concerned about the 10 cent fee that will be charged at the grocery store for the use of single-use paper bags. HELP COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE BY SPREADING ENERGY EFFICIENCY LADWP has announced its historic goal to move the City of Los Angeles completely off of coal power by 2025 and dramatically reduce the City’s greenhouse gas emissions well below 1990 levels. To accomplish that effectively, the City must meet robust energy efficiency goals among all communities. The project provides an educational pamphlet distributed within each bag, giving residents information and tips on LADWP-funded energy efficiency and water conservation programs, so that the environmental benefits to the City can be even larger while simultaneously shrinking utility bills for customers. BUILDING BRIDGES BETWEEN COMMUNITIES The Million Bag Giveaway Project will build a bridge of Social Connectedness and shared goals between two previously disparate communities who share similar challenges around assimilation and acceptance into mainstream society.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Moebius Incubator: A New Step for L.A.'s Entrepeneurs
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>We aim to improve L.A. by building on of one of L.A’s bright spots in the employment & income sector: it’s startup scene. LA is rated as the 3rd best place in the world to start a company (see Startup Ecosystem Report: http://reports.startupcompass.co/StartupEcosystemReportPart1v1.2.pdf), with its two weaknesses as support for entrepreneurship and the mindset for it. L.A. is well established as a haven of production talent and investment capital due largely to its relationship with Hollywood. The question becomes: how to leverage these natural strengths for the greater good of L.A.?</p> <p>We believe that entrepreneurship can become the new family-run business. As the information economy allows businesses to reach unprecedented scales, we see a potential for large-scale business to flourish here. The strong culture of family-run and immigrant-led businesses show that L.A. has been a great boon to individuals with drive. Our incubator, by explicitly engaging the design and engineering pieces needed to work in the information economy, aims to make develop entrepreneurship as a career path available to all — not just those primed for it. We believe that entrepreneurship can be a leveling force agains the great socioeconomic disparity present in L.A., by opening up a path to all that yields both personal financial reward as well as strong support for the local economy. </p> <p>Our first project aims to start 10 new companies in Los Angeles. With success, our incubator will run a spring and fall round in 2014, continuing that rate. We estimate our companies will grow by an average of 15 people in their first 2 years and 50 in their first 5 (based on the Ecosystem Report.) Assuming an 80% success rate of initial funding seen in Los Angeles by incubators such as LaunchpadLA, we expect to seed an incremental increase in jobs available over the next 5 years. Our hope is to add jobs — a projected 150 companies over 7 years with a total of 3,000 employees — as well as the contribution to a culture which can identify its own needs and turn them into its own jobs, addressing both the symptoms and the roots of the problem.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The Pulse of Los Angeles: Assessing the Watersheds
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Today, we know that many Angelenos don’t have a strong connection to the systems they rely upon and have only a vague idea of the impact of climate change on their lives. The truth is that if we don’t figure out how to live with the environment and within our water constraints, Los Angeles will fail as a major city. In thinking about how to catalyze the necessary changes, the Council for Watershed Health looks to its organizational “Vision 2025.” We envision a future for LA with clean water, reliable local water supplies, ample parks and open spaces, revitalized rivers, and vibrant communities. Looking at our own experience and examples throughout the region, we believe the creation of a report card is the most effective way to describe the progress towards this vision for all Angelenos to make them believe it is possible, and then update them regularly on how things were going. In creating a clear and easily understood way to regularly inform Angelenos about the health of our environment, the Pulse of Los Angeles project will create the knowledge needed to embody ecological health, social equity, and economic vitality. By using water and watersheds as the organizing principle, the Pulse will reconnect people to their landscape and waterways. It will become one of the critical tools for changing how people imagine the city, pointing the way towards so many of the changes we now hold dear. We recognize that human well-being is intrinsically tied to clean air, access to clean water, parks, and natural open spaces, and healthful food. The services provided by healthy ecosystems are essential to healthy communities and healthy people. In developing a tool that measures, values, and tracks progress towards urban water resources sustainability for the Los Angeles area we will catalyze the changes that lead to a healthy environment and strong economy.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The Salamander Project will excite, inspire and motivate students, parents, and school operators to rethink the future of Los Angeles and its public education system and kickstart a meaningful, bipartisan, reform-focused dialogue. At the end of the grant period, The Salamander Project will have built a fully functioning Innovation Space at the Locke campus and conducted ‘creativity generation’ activities with 500 students. Beyond the grant period, No Right Brain Left Behind will continue to work with Green Dot to further develop the HackerSpace in a Box while building an online community with content, lesson plans, and inspiration where teachers using similar devices and DIY learning can upload their findings and classroom experiments. Green Dot will partner with other product developers in the creation and piloting of new digital learning tools, curricula, and lesson plans while providing a demonstration site for others in the education community to glimpse the possibilities of the future of public education in L.A. Just a month ago, the Los Angeles School Board elections inspired only 6% voter participation across Los Angeles, despite general awareness that our public schools are in crisis. Voter participation in the communities most dramatically impacted by poor political decision-making is even lower and illustrates a resignation to the idea that the status quo is unalterable. More than ever, the city’s communities require inspiration and motivation to believe that something better is possible. Already, Green Dot invests significant resources in educating and training the adult communities in which we work to equip them with the tools necessary to become empowered and authentic agents of change. The Innovation Space will allow parents to access ‘Creativity Generators’ themselves and connect with other communities just as their children connect with students from around the world. The Salamander Project will show parents that a successful, positive, and thriving public education is a very real possibility and in doing so, inspire greater optimism and civic engagement. Beyond our own students and their families, the Innovation Space will host visits and demonstrations for other school leaders interested in developing similar spaces of their own. The project will result in an affordable ‘blueprint’ of how to replicate the Innovation Space at other schools across the city. It is our hope that a network of such Spaces would connect students, teachers, and communities from across Los Angeles and contribute to wide-scale collaboration and understanding. In providing a working model of a truly 21st century learning environment, we hope to excite, inspire and motivate others to rethink the future of Los Angeles and its public education system and kickstart a meaningful, bipartisan, reform-focused dialogue.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The South LA Hub: Strengthening Nonprofits in South Los Angeles
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

With the city’s massive physical landscape, our slow move towards an integrated public transit system, and the fast-paced lifestyle many of us lead, it’s not easy for Angelenos to connect with one another. Without mechanisms to facilitate interactions, or organizations ready with the skills, strategies and tactics to effectively encourage public engagement, Los Angeles will have more of the same fragmented, often unengaged communities. Our goal is to build up Los Angeles organizations that focus on civic engagement, voter turn-out, neighborhood-based advocacy, and local community building to change this. With stronger, more collaborative, and strategic community organizations, Los Angeles residents will receive better services, become more informed, and find new pathways to participate in community. In time, this means higher voter turnout, greater civic discourse, heightened community collaboration, and new organizations and campaigns coming from the ground up. These neighborhood based initiatives would be made of people with skills to tackle almost any issue – from crime and violence prevention to low-performing schools and public health. UCLA’s Luskin Center for Public Affairs’ report on the state of non-profit organizations in Los Angeles County found an extreme service gap in low-income communities – nonprofits exist in the lowest numbers in poor neighborhoods. This means that, at present day, the people in Los Angeles who have the least support are those who essentially need it the most. Our focus on South Los Angeles represents a desire to reverse the service gap by strengthening the organizations that already exist so that they might more effectively engage Angelenos. The regional emphasis also represents our long-term commitment to serving underserved communities of color. We strongly believe that the South Los Angeles Hub is the first step in designing an engagement model that can be replicated city-wide.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
The power in an hour: Putting time for teachers back in a principal's day
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Across Los Angeles every morning, 750,000 students enter their classrooms. Each of these classrooms is led by a teacher. And each teacher should have a leader who can come into their classroom, observe their instruction and help them to grow so that those 750,000 students get the education that they need to be successful. Our LA2050 proposal will enable this to happen at a dramatically greater scale. This project will identify great ideas, develop them into tools that can be replicated, and test them for efficacy. Once they have been demonstrated to be effective they will be ready to be shared across the hundreds of schools that exist in LA. For example, a tool that saves a principal <b>an hour a day</b>, spread to schools across Los Angeles would translate to nearly a <b>225,000 hours of coaching and support</b> for teachers in their classrooms during each school year. By 2050 this would lead to over <b>8 million</b> additional hours spent developing effective educators in LA.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Think Before You Trash
Think Before You Trash 4 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Grain of Sand - Granito de Arena brings inner-city children to the beach, and pairs them with local surfers and environmental speakers for a day of learning, surfing and beach clean ups. Through fun and mentorship, young people understand that the beach is just as much theirs as everyone else’s and it's up to them to take care of it. The children develop an understanding of: the negative effects of water and land pollution, the impact that individuals and communities have on the ocean, the profound effects of recycling programs and the importance of wiser buying choices. Furthermore, exercising in nature through surfing encourages children to become more active and healthier.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles is called "the Entertainment Capital of the World." It has a creative economy that generates close to $4 billion in state tax revenues, employs a million people in Los Angeles and Orange counties, and accounts for $100 billion in sales/receipts in L.A. County alone. Yet there are whole areas, whole neighborhoods, often for miles on end, where there are no bookstores, no movie houses, no art galleries, no cultural spaces. These culturally barren sections include South Central L.A., East L.A., the Harbor, and the Northeast San Fernando Valley. The arts are concentrated in downtown, the shoreline, Hollywood, museum row, and such. We are not opposed to these vital tourist-laden centers of culture and commerce. But we need a neighborhood arts policy in Los Angeles so that every community can benefit from cultural store fronts, independent bookstores, public art projects including murals, workshops in all the arts, digital arts, and more. Tia Chucha's Centro Cultural's "Art Transforms Community" workshops prove this works in any neglected and resource-limited area of the city. Flavored by the people of the Northeast San Fernando Valley, Tia Chucha's is a model of how every community can have its own cultural wellness center -- they can name it for someone else's aunt if they wish. The point is that the arts are they key "log," the one stake that when moved opens up a logjam. The arts reach across ethnicity, race, religion, and culture. The arts are the unity-in-diversity that finds commonality and wholeness to one of the most divided and contentious cities in America.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Transforming Lives, One Show at a Time
Transforming Lives, One Show at a Time
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

By working in the greater Los Angeles community, on stage and in schools, using the medium of theatre, CRE Outreach confronts many challenges that at-risk youth and the disabled community face. Our work provides a constructive and creative forum for participants to bring issues to the forefront and let their voice be heard. Our programs actively engage the most under-served individuals to live better lives and empower them to successfully navigate through today’s society.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Transforming Los Angeles Schools Using the Parent Trigger Law
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p>For far too long, meaningful power in regards to education policy has essentially rested in the hands of distant school district management and teachers unions. This has led to policies that far too often make little or no sense for children trapped in Los Angeles’ failing schools. </p> <p>We believe that fundamentally altering that power structure by introducing parents as real power players in a strategic way is the best way towards transformative policy change in public education, and each one of our strategies and tactics are geared towards accomplishing that endgame.</p> <p>As we build a cadre of strong parent chapters across Los Angeles fighting for reforms at their children’s low-performing schools, we will simultaneously begin focusing on translating those chapters into a city-wide movement for kids-first reforms in adult and school accountability, teacher effectiveness, college readiness, and other important areas.</p> <p>The first step in that process is to build strong horizontal relationships between our different chapters based on shared experiences and similar roadblocks they encounter in their Parent Trigger campaign efforts.</p> <p>We are certain that as our Parents Union Chapters launch in-district Parent Trigger efforts at their individual schools, other chapters across Los Angeles will consistently come up against similar roadblocks that are out of the hands of their local administrators or even their school district – state rules that force layoffs based only on seniority or that prohibit meaningful accountability by immediately granting teachers tenure after only two years.</p< <p>We will be actively and constantly seizing on these opportunities to channel parents’ frustrations up to district-wide and statewide advocacy efforts, which will serve as a key facilitator of our parent empowerment movement building efforts. </p> <p>All the while, however, we work to build horizontal relationships between the different chapters to create advocacy alliances based on common problems they are encountering at their schools. We thus very intentionally will use these chapters to build a local movement to advocate for key policy reforms on the district level always providing the type of sophisticated advocacy tools that are crucial for success by supplementing this grassroots movement with our organization’s proven skill sets in media, politics, and law. </p> <p>This philosophy guides our approach, which uses the Parent Trigger in partnership with sophisticated community organizing techniques to build a powerful, parent-based, movement for education policy that puts kids first. </p> <p>Thousands of children that are trapped in Los Angeles’ low-performing schools will become lifetime beneficiaries of this approach to education reform.</p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

California Calls’ voter engagement program will help to reclaim the democratic process that now belongs to special interests, lobbyists and campaign committees. We encourage low-income voters to exercise their democratic right to vote with stunning success. The simple reason is that our “messengers”—the volunteers and team members who reach out to voters—are peers. Through the community-based organizations which operate these programs, young, bi-lingual people of color serve as door-to-door canvassers and phone bankers who talk to voters. They establish a rapport that earns the trust of skeptical voters. By engaging voters consistently in understanding crucial public policy issues (not only during election cycles), the California Calls model of voter engagement will produce several direct benefits: a. Advance Policies to Benefit Low-Income People: Our member organizations (see below) have outstanding track records winning significant benefits for low-income communities throughout Los Angeles, including: • reducing the number of nuisance liquor stores and transient motels; • assuring that all high schools offer college-prep courses and adequate college counselors; • negotiating with large companies—like Dreamworks—to provide jobs and apprenticeship training for inner city youth; • designing an energy conservation program for publicly-owned buildings that trains inner city youth in “green” construction; • creating programs for homeowners to avoid foreclosure and stay in their homes • closing toxic and harmful factories next to schools The proposed voter outreach program will enable all four community organizations to identify and recruit local residents to become involved in ongoing campaigns and to develop their leadership skills. b. Increase Voter Turnout so LA’s Electorate Reflects Our Population: The California Call’s model of civic engagement targets new and occasional voters in low-income Latino, African-American and immigrant neighborhoods. By increasing the voting participation rate of these residents, our program will help to insure that policies and candidates will more closely reflect the views and desires of residents of Los Angeles—the true meaning of democracy. Especially in local elections where turnout rates are historically low, this program can create a tipping point for greater representation of low-income communities. c. Create Accountability for Elected Representatives through an Informed Citizenry California Calls will increase accountability and transparency of elected representatives by creating a more informed and engaged citizenry. Our Telephone Town Halls will provide voters with the opportunity to hear directly—and engage directly—with the City’s new Mayor, new City Council members and other elected officials. The ongoing education and discussion through door-to-door canvassing and high-capacity phone outreach will increase the level of voter understanding on key issues.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
URBAN AIR
URBAN AIR 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Urban Air is a public artwork that also puts an active face on the possibility of urban sustainability. Urban Air will bring an urgency and vibrancy to the civic landscape, inspire community dialogue and action, beautify transit corridors, and ultimately connect people. Much like a modern city, bamboo is at once both vertical and horizontal. Each culm is connected to and sustained by the others through a vast rhizome network. Like streets, mass transit, or electrical grids in a modern city, everything and everyone is connected. The health of any individual within such a system is ultimately dependent on the health of the system as a whole. Urban Air will contribute to the overall health of Los Angeles. Throughout history, art has been a vital sphere and critical element in the construct of communities. It has lived in the public realm in cave paintings, religious idols and shrines, piazza’s, monuments, and more. In the 20th century, with the privatization of culture, art moved more into the realm of institutions, museums, and private collections. The sphere of art however, still occupies critical social space. It enhances cities by contributing to commerce and helping to revitalize neighborhoods and communities. Today however, the presence and role of art is frequently replaced by advertising. Urban Air will also generate value and spectacle in the public realm, though with a different intent. Urban Air reclaims the territory of advertising traditionally occupied by billboards, and as such directly intervenes, engages, and transforms it. Today advertising is consciously exploring its ability to generate new value. Social entrepreneurship, transparency, and sustainability are emerging as business’s new index of what matters. Likewise, the need to experience creativity “for no reason” - art for art’s sake - in daily, urban life, becomes more urgent. Urban Air takes on that action. With its ideal climate, Los Angeles is poised to become a world leader in sustainable urban culture. As an accessible work of art and a green, interconnected billboard, Urban Air will be a flag flown for both.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Upcycle Innovation
Upcycle Innovation 15 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

In 2013 our project will benefit Angelenos by providing a full service center for hand-on arts. Our goal is to open the project in the Fall and serve 700 people a month. Additionally, we will save an anticipated 3 tons of reusable materials from the landfill. As the project grows in the coming years these numbers will grow. ReDiscover Center programs benefit the youth of Los Angeles by providing art-based instruction at a time when school funding cuts have all but eliminated arts education. The programs are designed to promote collaboration, community stewardship, and critical thinking skills. Our Upcycle Innovation project will expand these programs. The Los Angeles Almanac projects by 2050 the population of our city will be 11,434,565. The impact of such a population boom on the volume of waste without dedicated space and resources to curb behavior cannot currently be measured. By creating a space dedicated to engagement through full-scale arts and tinkering programs, and triangulation with community organizations and leaders, we can realistically reach our goal of an entire generation of Angelenos growing up with the not just the understanding the concept of repurposing, but actually having taken an active part in the process.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Urban Forest
Urban Forest 76 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Today, Southern California has the poorest air quality in the United States. The combination of copious amounts of asphalt, a distressed urban forest, and low amounts of accessible public park land are the largest contributors of this effect. Not to mention that city temperatures are getting higher – but this trend can be reversed!<br> As a catalyst for sustainable thinking and partnerships, the Urban Forest program has the potential to improve the overall environmental quality and positively impact the public health of the City transforming Los Angeles from a concrete jungle into a greener city – perhaps to be known as the City of Trees.<br> The trees will be planted throughout the City with a special emphasis on low income neighborhoods, industrial corridors, public school and public parks. The trees will provide cooling through evapotranspiration and by providing shade. The trees will also help improve our air quality by removing excess CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with oxygen, making it easier for Angelenos to breathe and decreasing the asthma and respiratory health problems in the City. Furthermore, vegetation acts as a natural filter for water, picking up contaminants that will improve the overall water supply. <br> In sum Los Angeles will greatly benefit from this program through improving air quality, decreasing the heat island effect, improving water quality, increasing awareness, decreasing health related risks and creating a healthier, more livable Los Angeles for generations to come.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Van Nuys Blvd. Green Project
Van Nuys Blvd. Green Project
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

The project will benefit Los Angeles in several forms, both direct and indirect. The direct ways in which L.A. benefits from our project is by making less environmental impacts. L.A. also benefits from the awareness and practice of environmentally friendly business improvements that don’t require investments of over $1,000. The indirect ways in which Los Angeles benefits from the proposed project is by creating a collaborative culture between environmental justice and business. Often, environmental justice organizations are thought of as wanting to keep business and industry out of their area. Pacoima Beautiful knows that in order for our community to thrive, we need to welcome business and take their investment in our community as an opportunity for collaboration. We look forward to engaging business into the environmental justice conversation. As a result of our program the rest of L.A. can have a model program to look towards when looking to bring business and communities together for the long-term benefit of our environment.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Veteran Housing Retention Initiative
Veteran Housing Retention Initiative
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our Housing Retention Program will directly benefit 55 veterans and their families with helping them attain and maintain permanent housing. The program will provide up to $1,125 in tenant based rental/utility assistance. Additionally, these veterans will benefit from the continued clinical case management services and ability to address developing issues before they reach crisis mode. Los Angeles’ high rate of homeless veterans will be decreased by the addition of this program, and the rate of housing retention will increase. Some of the populations most at risk that U.S. VETS assists is veterans with mental health issues and histories of incarceration. In both populations, access to community support services has been proven to decrease the incidence episodes of care in hospitals and recidivism among the parolee population. Reducing emergency hospital episodes and lock up time saves the city and State tremendous amounts of funding that can be directed at other citizens. As the veterans in the Housing Retention program succeed, they will be more engaged in their communities, with their families and their veteran peers. After 20 years of providing housing to veterans, U.S. VETS has seen the benefit to the community of veterans who become role models of positive behavior. They influence the behavior of their peers and their children in meaningful ways. Once housing is stabilized, people are able to focus their attention on improving other areas of their lives including continuing education and participation in community and cultural experiences. Removing the stress of not having a sense of security in the basic human need of safe shelter will enable these veterans to improve their health and relationships with their families.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Virtual Mentor Program for Foster and At-risk Youth
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Virtual mentors can help foster youth enter and complete college, and as indicated in the LA2050 challenge, better education can increase prospects and participation in community life in all areas of the LA2050 challenge, creating better citizens and a better city. A myriad of resources exist to support my assumptions about the potential benefits of providing mentors to youth who lack the support and guidance of a stable family. M.R. Munson et al. found that “older youth exiting foster care value having someone that maintains contact, stays by their side, and is simply there for them” (Munson & McMillen, 2009). Samuels and Pryce found that young adults more often seek instrumental forms of support, such as help with housing, but that their pride may hinder them from asking for emotional support (Griffin et al., 2011; Samuels, 2008). Data from this study revealed that both of these forms of support were perceived by the foster youth as valuable. Leadbeater & Way’s study on young adults reported that they often want another person in their lives that will hold them accountable and set limits (Leadbeater & Way, 2001). Finally, the National Mentoring Partnership (2004) found that an online mentoring program taking place between 2002-2004 “bolstered mentees' self-esteem, literacy and future orientation.” Why virtual mentors? There are two main reasons. First, in reading the existing literature about the most established face-to-face mentoring programs, and surveying adult peers about their potential willingness to be a mentor, it seems that one of the main impediments to peoples’ willingness to be a mentor is the expectation that the mentor commit to a regularly-scheduled, minimum amount of time spent with the mentee, not including travel time and having to juggle unexpected conflicts and the vagaries of today’s overcrowded lifestyles. This seems to be a commitment that may feel overwhelming for the average bright, accomplished, busy individual who could probably REALLY help a youth navigate the complexities of his or her own life if the volunteer had the flexibility to make this commitment fit within his or her own set of obligations. Indeed I myself have always wanted to be a mentor or big sister but have always hesitated when trying to imagine myself fighting traffic to get to East LA by a certain time to meet a vulnerable kid waiting and wondering if I am going to show up and then there is an accident on the freeway and one of my kids’ schools calls to inform me that a kid is sick, etc… The second reason virtual mentoring makes sense is that today’s youth are potentially as or more comfortable with online communication as they are face-to-face communication. Additionally, given that many foster youth have issues of trust and attachment, a virtual relationship may feel safer and less overwhelming than a traditional face-to-face relationship with a stranger who looks like the many other adults who may have already disappointed a mentee.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Visual Arts Education at Heart of Los Angeles
Visual Arts Education at Heart of Los Angeles 3 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Residing in the culturally rich, but economically struggling Rampart District, HOLA serves youth in one of the most densely populated areas in LA County, with over 75,000 residents within a 1.75-mile radius, 28% of which are under the age of 18. Latinos comprise the largest ethnic group in the community at 63% followed by Asian Americans at 26%. Of the families that HOLA serves, 90% are living at or below the poverty line and struggle each day to simply survive. As a result of these poverty levels and the dense and diverse population, this district is home to heavy violence, drug trafficking and over 30 active gangs that begin recruiting youth as young as 10 years of age. According to a LA Times report, during a recent 6-month period, 488 violent crimes were reported in HOLA’s neighborhood alone. This at-risk environment is compounded by severe school budget cuts that have resulted in fewer critical services being offered to families in dire need. Students are attending overcrowded and understaffed schools that are unable to provide the individual support each student needs to successfully pursue their education. Many schools’ arts education programs have been devastated by the state and local budgetary crisis and unfortunately, “most of this decline in access has been concentrated in schools serving low-income students, the very population that can benefit most from quality arts instruction.” The National Endowment for the Arts reports that arts education for Latino and African-American students has declined by over 40% in the last twenty years. HOLA provides a rigorous arts program for youth right in the center of this impoverished neighborhood. Access to arts education is a critical need for underserved students across LA. Engagement in the arts has proven to bolster academic achievement, supporting HOLA’s long-term aim to help all of its youth graduate high school and matriculate through college. As creative industries are the second largest business sector in LA, arts education is crucial in developing 21st century workforce skills. HOLA’s Visual Arts is not simply an arts education supplement, but a structured and immersive program offering rigorous instruction, cultural field trips, guest artist workshops, and a firm reach into the larger LA community. Through initiatives like the Public Art Project, HOLA’s students, leading LA artists and community members are connected in new and meaningful ways. The Visual Arts program is operating at capacity, with a lengthy waiting list, but carries the potential to impact even more than HOLA’s 2,500 at-risk youth and their families, and to activate and create dialogue in parts of the city previously lacking access to the arts.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Wayfinder LA, a utility for car-free transit
Wayfinder LA, a utility for car-free transit 2 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Wayfinder will benefit Los Angeles and its residents in two distinct realms: the social and the structural. Social benefits include to those that directly benefit individuals, like improved air quality, less expensive transportation, and increased physical exercise. The structural benefits are those that result from the coordinated activity of thousands of travelers and enable our urban planners to maximize the efficiency of our transit systems. Social Benefits Wayfinder’s benefits are the benefits of sustainable, efficient multi-modal transportation. Those we have listed above under the first question and we think they’re a no-brainer. The more challenging question is this: How do we encourage Angelenos to change their attitudes toward transportation, and how do we get them to adopt more sustainable methods of transit? The answer: provide Angelenos with the necessary information to make smart, confident choices about transportation. Here’s an example: Recently, we were talking to our friend Brian, who lives in Culver City and works on the PCH in Malibu. Brian rides a bike for exercise in recreation, but spends about 90 minutes in the car each day, traveling the 36 miles round trip work and back. In the course of our conversation about his commute, he realized that he could ride his bike 7 miles to the 534 Metro Express stop and ride the bus to work from there. Brian calculated that the trip would take only 15 more minutes each way, and he began to grow excited as he realized that he would be cutting the roughly $40 a week he spends on gas to get to and from work to $15 in bus fare. By the time he realized that he would now spend half his commute exercising on his bicycle and the other half reading or gazing at the Pacific Ocean, he was ecstatic. Brian has changed his routine, and all he needed to do so was a little bit of information and the encouragement. We think there are hundreds of thousands of people in LA who rely on cars when they don’t have to, and we want all of them to have the same epiphany Brian did. When they do, they’ll live healthier, more sustainable lives, and Los Angeles will be a better place to live. Structural Benefits Los Angeles’ public transit infrastructure is chronically underused simply because Angelenos are not aware of how to make the most of it. Brian, for example, had no idea that a bus could get him to work. LA taxpayers have spent millions on public transportation infrastructure over the past few decades, but we’re wasting a lot of that money if we don’t maximize the use of our existing infrastructure. Wayfinder aims to do just that by providing paths to access public transit systems. Further, by using smartphone geolocation technology to track our user’s trips, we determine which routes are most favorable to multi-modal travelers. Suddenly, the best routes are publically available information, and transit streamlines itself along these routes the way tributaries converge to form rivers. With all of the

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
We are an experimental food and art space in Los Angeles.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Thank You For Coming is dedicated to an always-open, inclusive and connected “vibe” where people of all-ages, families, and loners can congregate to feed and be fed and nourish and create; allowing for the possibility of an unexpected discovery of art and culture. We provide a place where people can hang out, have fun, develop personal relationships, and then choose their own mechanism for participation. Our approach encourages opportunities for social connectedness while participating in autonomous cultural practices such as organizing, creating, bartering and volunteering. We offer food as an accessible medium that can break down barriers of hierarchy in order to include more people into a conversation about our streets, neighborhoods, communities and city. By presenting and supporting Los Angeles residents’ creative projects and offering opportunities for true participation, we encourage coherent discourse addressing a bevy of Los Angeles-specific topics, including: food costs and sources, economy, education, transportation, recreation, cultural histories, etc. Additionally, Thank You For Coming houses an artist-in-residency program which provides a monthlong opportunity to use our kitchen, garden, and volunteer resources to play and explore. Through an open application process, we invite people with varying experiences and backgrounds to propose and develop a creative project in the context of sharing food. Residents then utilize our restaurant space as a platform for public engagement and creative experimentation. This program has and will continue to strongly support local applicants as the majority selected to be artists-in-residence at Thank You For Coming live in LA.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
What’s the BF(B)D? Connecting Neighborhoods through Bicycle-Friendly Business Districts
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

&nbsp;</p>There are currently 38 Business Improvement Districts in the City of Los Angeles, several other business associations, and hundreds of other business groups around LA County. Several have approached us, wanting to create bicycle-friendly business district initiatives after seeing our success in other cities, but lacking the seed money to kick-start them. This grant will create five successful programs and serve as examples for others to replicate. Program work will be broadcast by LA Streetsblog to countywide and national audiences and through media releases. &nbsp;</p>Through this program, we are cultivating future leaders in this emerging sector by building ties between local advocates and business owners and by engaging interns with diverse backgrounds to learn a unique blend of business, planning, and communication skills. Our future economy will rely on individuals who can bridge barriers and collaborate with people in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. &nbsp;</p>Why is bicycling important for LA’s neighborhoods and local businesses? Bicyclists travel at human scale speed and are more connected to their surroundings than if whizzing by in a car. They can easily stop and say hi to friends, hop off, park for free, and patronize a business. Bicyclists shop more frequently and spend more money cumulatively than those arriving by other modes. Sometimes they become repeat customers and get to know the business owner by name. It’s old-fashioned Americanism at its best. It’s when a family of four chooses to spend its Saturday afternoon bicycling to the local toy or ice cream shop instead of driving across town to a mall. &nbsp;</p>When businesses make deliveries and run errands via bicycle – whether it’s one company’s bike or shared district bikes – business owners who never met before become acquainted and interact more. Business Improvement Districts who conduct some of their operations and promotions via bike instead of car become more connected to the communities they’re representing. &nbsp;</p>Bicyclists in business districts bring more ‘eyes and ears’ to keep an area safe, vibrant, and connected. Increased bicycling also correlates to decreased driving, traffic, car speeds, and parking congestion. It brings safer public streets for all users. &nbsp;</p>Bicycling – exercise, fresh air, and social interaction – improves the emotional, mental and physical health of children and adults. It increases happiness, improves school and work performance, and decreases obesity, heart disease, asthma, depression, and social alienation. &nbsp;</p>Encouraging human-scale traveling and interaction is key to revitalizing our struggling small business districts and putting LA on the map as a livable place and destination.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Why is the grass always greener over the leach fields?
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Wildwood Mobile Home Country Club Park is at the end of two natural corridors and is also at the end of an industrial corridor, and a direct intervention at Wildwood would quickly impact this depraved community and improve the environmental quality for hundreds: The San Jose Creek is straddled by the City of Industry. As is often the case around rivers in Los Angeles, where the soil is unstable and sometimes contaminated, they build mobile homes, golf courses and schools, and it’s where the industrial and rail corridors are. The industrial corridor in of its business is revealed to be dangerous sometimes. While many visible occupants in the City of Industry are large chain distribution factories and commercial warehouses, there are some Industrial manufacturing complexes. One notorious neighbor, Quemetco, is a lead recycling plant and within a mile of the Wildwood entrance. Ranked #6 of top polluters in California on an EPA ‘Toxic Release Inventory,’ 1,756,634 pounds of total release (of chemical toxins) in a year, includes lead and nitrate compounds (EPA TRI 2011). Residents have been warned of lead pollution by the company’s required mailed-out literature, of possible arsenic and lead compounds and acid vapors in the air. But some of us cannot move away so easily, as the expression goes, ‘we have lead shoes.’ The Puente-Chino Hills Animal Corridor runs parallel to the elongated City of Industry but to the south and is “an unbroken zone of habitat extending nearly 31 miles from the Cleveland National Forest in Orange County to the west end of the Puente Hills…30,000 acres of land” (Habitat Authority). La Puente Landfill funded the preservation authority (tipping fee) to purchase the nearby Puente Hills (Habitat Authority). A 2005 City of Industry planned development, which cuts off this animal corridor in the middle, reflects a pattern of hostility towards ecological considerations by the City of Industry (Spencer, Puente-Chino “Missing Middle” Analysis). Auspiciously, this animal corridor ends at La Puente Landfill, as the only way to connect across the 605 freeway to Whittier Narrows is to fly over or dig under the freeway and through the river (or go through one child-sized underground tunnel?). This also poses an opportunity to provide habitat for wildlife we’d like to attract, like birds. A solution needs to address both of these issues. As a rail passes within 300 feet of these mobile homes right passed the fairway, a more substantial barrier could be established. The industrial corridor pollutes enough into the river system; more properties need to treat their toxic runoff on site. There has to be more creative solutions than golf courses, especially when they are not in use. A second solution should address the animal corridor and alternative ground paths to Whittier Narrows. Some wildlife will be encouraged to visit Wildwood, especially the healthy bird wildlife found in Los Angeles through habitat planning and planting

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
You Can Compost That!
You Can Compost That! 15 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Our project would primarily benefit Los Angeles by reducing its environmental impacts. However, it would also produce positive outcomes for several other indicators included in the My LA2050 Challenge. Below is a list of just some of the benefits provided by our project: - Food waste composting will significantly reduce Los Angeles’ contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. In addition, diverting food waste from landfills will help improve air quality in Los Angeles by reducing the vehicles miles traveled by waste haulers to landfills and lessening odors produced by the rotting of organic waste. - Providing affordable weekly food scrap pickup will help Los Angeles meet the State’s waste diversion requirement to divert at least 50% of waste from landfills after 2004. Existing landfill lifespans in the Los Angeles area would also be increased by composting. - Create jobs for Angelenos as we will need individuals to perform weekly pickup services in the various neighborhoods of Los Angeles - Setting up composting operations in our schools would allow them to reduce their waste management expenses, produce the fertilizer needed for their grounds, generate income by composting community food waste, and teach students important lessons in biology, ecology, agriculture, and sustainability. - Both residents and businesses of Los Angeles can potentially save money by reducing the amount of trash picked up by conventional haulers to be sent to landfills. Additionally, they will gain satisfaction from helping their local schools. - Increase environmental awareness within Los Angeles in general, particularly with regards to food wastefulness and global climate change - Organic farms will benefit from the incoming stream of compostable food waste provided by our service. The compost will be used to enhance or increase crop yield, completing the farm-to-table-to-farm circle.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Young Leaders For A Healthy LA
Young Leaders For A Healthy LA 40 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Young adults (18-34) continue to go uninsured and without access to basic health care at rates that far exceed the rest of the population. The ACA presents an opportunity to make huge gains for young adults. In CA, there are 3.1 million uninsured young adults, representing 32.8% of all young Californians. Of that 3.1 million, 2.7 million earn under 400% of the federal poverty level and therefore would qualify for either subsidies in the exchange or Medi-Cal. Young adults comprise 42% of the total uninsured population in CA. California also has a highly diverse young adult population, many of whom are uninsured. In fact, about 42% of young Latinos (18-34) are uninsured. Enrolling these young adults in new exchanges is not only important for the health and financial well-being of this population, but critical for the overall CA insurance market as it spreads risk and can help keep premiums down. These rates are starkest in Los Angeles County where the 39% uninsured rate for young adults surpasses the statewide average of 31%. Both rates exceed the national average. We want to change this by decreasing the number of young adults of color in Los Angeles who go uninsured. Young Invincibles will utilize our Young Promoters and health care education mobile app and a push text message campaign to complement a broader social media and communications campaign. Our diverse network of 20 Young Promoters will dramatically expand the reach of YI by hosting local youth trainings in their community or on campus, and by promoting the mobile app and health coverage awareness through social media. The mobile app will provide key information about the ACA, places to find local doctors and community health centers, a portal to Covered California, and have the ability to reach the population repeatedly through push text notifications. Using online social media outreach– targeted Facebook promotions, contests, engagement with Twitter influencers– and combining this method with dissemination of our on-the-ground Young Promoters trainings, we can educate young adults on the ACA, facilitate the download of our mobile app, and ultimately reach thousands of uninsured young people. Once these young people have been trained by their peers and downloaded the app, they can be valuable leaders in their own communities. We will also use social media more broadly to build awareness as major changes occur. During the launch of open enrollment on October 1, 2013 and around special enrollment times like graduation, we will launch highly sharable social media content. For example, we will ask our Young Promoters to post content that contains our enrollment messages to their personal networks and to share a form for friends to get signed up for more information. We will use our own organizational social media platforms, engage with partner social media organizations, and work with social media influencers to push out those messages and drive young adults to the exchange.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Young Warriors
Young Warriors
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Based on statistics from the California Family Council, children from fatherless homes are more likely to: commit suicide, be poor, drop out of school, have maladaptive behavior, be abused, abuse drugs and alcohol, run away, join gangs, wind up in state institutions or on state welfare, or be killed. Young Warrior changes these boys future for the betterment of themselves and society. 1. The first objective of YW is to increase self-esteem and self-efficacy in boys whose identity is lost and who are at risk of becoming another troubling statistic. YW mentors inspire boys discover their own strengths, take on new challenges, and face their failures as well as their victories. In these critical life lessons, YW mentors develop trust with participants so that the participants are able to hear good advice, and therefore, become good decision makers. 2. The second objective of YW is to encourage and develop positive interpersonal communication amongst participants, mentors, peers, parents, guardians, teachers, and authorities. YW mentors promote diversity and respect for others by modeling self-discipline, integrity, honesty, compassion, forgiveness, ethical and moral behavior. YW starts cultivating these skills in the home by collaborating with a local Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) in creating a parent education program. This curriculum assists parents become more effective in the lives of their boys. 3. Finally, YW third objective is to prevent negative, risk-taking behavior, including gang prevention. YW reduces the need to find security in gangs, substance abuse, or the like by instilling worth and confidence in participant's abilities. YW participants learn anger management, conflict resolution, and how to engage themselves in healthy, positive affiliations with others.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Young people want to feel safe too
Young people want to feel safe too
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles is a big city. It is a safe city. But, our city doesn't feel safe to any of our youth and many adults. This misperception could arguably create more unhappiness than we really need. The fear of regions that have been infamously labeled such as "South Central", and "East LA" characterize the perception of fear people have for areas they have never really visited or experienced. Furthermore, controversies such as the Rodney King Beating and human rights violation charges in the Sheriff's department only further the perception that Los Angeles is a dangerous uninhabitable city. When in reality much has changed while the perception of these agencies has not. The research project by SORIN MATEI, SANDRA J. BALL-ROKEACH, and JACK LINCHUAN QIU, titled, "Fear and Misperception of Los Angeles Urban Space: A Spatial-Statistical Study of Communication-Shaped Mental Maps." http://mentalmap.org/files/matei_fear_CR.pdf Statistically analyzed how heightened and unsafe our populace feels even though crime has dropped to 1950 levels. Part of the fear is of law enforcement by youth. They do not see law enforcement as a support system, rather they see them as "the system" which is designed to take them from their families, harm them, and carry weapons. The dialogue has disappeared and youth no longer actively participate in the community policing relationship. This project will teach youth the law so they understand the logic and perception that law enforcement must walk within while investigating crimes. Furthermore, they will be actively exposed to law enforcement so the fear of the unknown will be reduced. RJ means less administrative and criminal justice costs. Officers will be able to patrol more rather than be involved in administrative protocols involving youth, the courts will have reduced responsibility, public trust will increase and community policing with be promoted. Furthermore, it reduces incarceration of youth which saves $200,000 per youth in the system. This program will save literally millions with just the initial investment of $100,000 to help our community. Using Strategies For Youth's Model of juvenile justice Jeopardy and Policing the Teen brain LA CAUSA is poised to empower youth and law enforcement. Eventually engaging them in dialogue on a level that is frank, intimate, and respectful. Youth and law enforcement alike will learn to empathize and communicate, role play and discourse together. Society as a whole in Los Angeles will benefit.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Youth Outreach Unit "Together We Create a Better Y.O.U."
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Demographic experts tell us that if juvenile crime rates for persons 10 to 17 continue to increase with expected youth population increases, the year 2010 will see the number of juvenile-committed violent crimes increase by nearly 15 percent. However, these projections do not have to be America's destiny. Over the past two years, there has been a decline in the rates of both murders committed by youth and youth violence in general. While the juvenile violent crime arrest rate increased 62% between 1987 and 1993, it decreased 2.9% in 1995, the first decline in seven years. As the problem of juvenile violence has grown, so has our understanding of the problem and some possible solutions. A small percentage of youth are responsible for the bulk of violent juvenile crime; most violent crimes committed by youth are committed against other juveniles; and many involve handguns and/or drug use. Violence is a learned behavior and children neglected, left alone, or uncared for, without appropriate role models, often do not learn right from wrong. Children who suffer abuse at the hands of family violence often learn that violence is natural, even expected. The success of our V2K Community Development Program has been positively correlated with a multitude of public service assistance. Experts agree that the best predictors of successful transition are: an intensively supportive environment, counseling, mentoring, education, drug treatment, and opportunities for employment. A highly structure multidisciplinary case plan and customized youth services are unavoidably intertwined as a means to successfully engage youth and propel them towards a productive future. The unique program design and topic courses that we have created with the target population in mind (i.e. safety, date rape, gang abatement, self-esteem, childcare, health care, rape crisis counseling, youth support, anger management, violence awareness, mentoring, academic assistance, communication, etc.) will especially benefit minors who have a propensity to engage in criminal and delinquent behavior. Many experts agree that the way one thinks, leads to the way an individual behaves. Delinquency and youth crime affect not only the victims, but has a “domino effect” on the entire community regardless of the severity of the crime. As youth crime prevails, community fear increases, public safety costs rise, and insecurities abound. It costs more than $40,000 annually to maintain a juvenile in a correctional facility. It costs about $4,000 a year to keep a young person in school. As a result of the erosion of the value of the “family”, the rising costs for education, an increase in prison construction, dilapidated school systems, and cutbacks in state and federal funding, agencies have to rethink their approach to program service delivery. Our ultimate challenge is to debunk various published statistics and promote awareness for what goes on in our community.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Youth Take Their Lives Off The Streets And Into Gardens
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Streets2Gardens program will benefit Los Angeles by bridging the gap between different communities on the issue of environmental neglect. The Streets2Gardens program will create and promote a garden curriculum that can be replicated in any school and individual home. The program will also show how youth have a tremendous amount of power in changing the circumstances of their communities. By putting soil, seeds and trees in the hands of our youth, and connecting them with their community in a positive way, they will become catalysts for systemic change in their environments. Streets2Gardens will begin by getting 10 youth off the streets and into gardens, creating and teaching a garden curriculum that will be engaging and powerful. Streets2Gardens will get result in different sections of Los Angeles County coming together to discuss how their environment affects them and how the gardens will begin to address a number of health and environmental issues. The two existing gardens and the two new gardens, plus trees to be planted at all four sites, will begin a trend that will result in improved health and air quality in the area. The gardens will harvest fruits and vegetables that can be eaten by the children at the school and/or their parents. With the curriculum that is going to be created and shared with the participating schools, the schools can encourage and teach the parents to plant their own fruit and vegetable gardens. The possibilities are endless.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Youth for Environmental Justice and Community Revitalization
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Environmental justice communities are at the fence-line of polluting sources. Creating greener and cleaner operations at the fence-line neighborhoods and improving land-use decisions in vulnerable communities will not only promote the public health of residents most in need but also benefit the entire LA region. Addressing environmental equity for communities that have traditionally been neglected due to gaps in proper permitting, enforcement and planning will create great environmental benefits to the most susceptible LA communities by way of improved air quality, reduction of water pollution, enhanced access to open space, revitalization of blighted lands, greater access to healthy food options, greater community cohesion and overall improvement of quality of life. These benefits will not be limited to the areas that will be receiving direct attention. They will have a positive impact on all of the residents in the region by reducing pollution and spurring economic growth regionally. Working with businesses with industrial operations in environmental justice communities to better manage their storm water run-off will protect our waterways and the Pacific Ocean. Pushing for zero emission technologies during the expansion of goods-movement operations near Wilmington and along the I-710 corridor will benefit all communities in Los Angeles. Prioritizing green jobs and clean energy sources in low-income neighborhoods will benefit all LA residents and our planet by way of reducing our region’s carbon foot-print. We believe the main component of improving the quality of life for vulnerable communities is enhancing civic engagement of local residents in these communities, and this project is focused on this effort.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

With support from grants like this, we will be able to expand each of our programs to become year-long projects that last beyond the day of the event with dedicated staffs to each. We can create new hubs for lovers of film, music, theatre and art to experiment without worrying about the bottom line. We can be the premiere place where experimentation and collaboration is key, which is wildly important in a city where art can sometimes get lost in the Hollywood hustle. For example, we would love to add an extension to our No Budget Film Festival program by creating a monthly called “First Cut” where artists can show the first cut of their new film to a group of smart and creative individuals who can provide feedback. For Brokechella, we could create industry showcases for the artists we’ve worked with in the past to ensure they are getting the attention they deserve. In this way, we can ensure that all of the artists that come through our doors can receive help and constructive attention AFTER the day of the event. If the arts are our passion, then Los Angeles is indeed our canvas. With an aging population, we believe that it is absolutely crucial to continue creating opportunities for younger, emerging artists -- and not just to continue at our current rate, but to increase and expand opportunities across the board. Los Angeles is already a destination for so many young arts professionals, but we believe that our organization can be part of the effort to elevate L.A. as a true artistic community -- taking the “cool” factor of our local arts scene and making it possible for young artists to truly envision and experience a sustainable career in our city. We want to be able to sustain our city’s thriving arts and culture scene -- and to create opportunities that cut across existing social and economic divides. All of our projects support emerging artists who are trying to make a name for themselves, and we make our events as affordable and accessible as possible, so that young people interested in being part of our community will be able to do so. Los Angeles is an arts town, and a destination -- but too often it feels as if there is too much of a gap between the young and the established, and that many of the opportunities that exist here do not exist for everyone. cARTel is dedicated to giving people those opportunities. If people come to us with ideas, we listen. If people come to us wanting to help out or participate, we find a place for them. Our focus is truly on the collaborative and communal potential of art, and we feel that this philosophy can absolutely benefit the sometimes-fragmented communities of 21st century Los Angeles.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
daKAT House:  A Public Housing Project for musicians.
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Fundamentally, it would provide affordable housing to a large group of people. Even better, this large group of people happen to be outstanding musicians, who will dedicate the term of their leases to creating a musical ensemble with the other tenants. And, even better than that, this group of musicians is engaged in the surrounding community, providing affordable instrumental music lessons to those who wish to learn. Every month sees a performance of the house ensembles. These performances are recorded, and broadcast over the internet. A major factor in the promotion and exploitation of the recordings will be the fact that the musicians are living communally in subsidized housing provided through the city and federal government. A program like this presents the city as a patron to its own artists. This type of reputation can serve as a magnet for other artists to relocate to our city, contributing to the economy of L.A. Since the performances are affordable, the house ensembles present a way in which the working-class community can discover symphonic music in a live environment. Since tickets to the L.A. Phil can get pricey, the opportunity to see live symphonic music is limited to those who have disposable income. daKAT House provides this opportunity to those on a fixed budget. This project provides a cadre of music teachers at a cut-rate price to those who would like to learn. The location of the Echo Park property is in close enough proximity to the VAPA Magnet High School in downtown L.A. There are also several elementary and middle schools in the area that serve a working-class community. Discounted local music lessons could provide an option that may not have been available for some of these families.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

“Elementary instruction designated specifically for dance . . . is fast becoming an endangered species.” -- Erik W. Robelen, “No Obituary Needed for Arts Education, Study Reveals.” Education Week, April 11, 2012 (summarizing federal study on K-12 arts education). While the LA2050 report notes the relative strength of the arts in LA currently, a critical weakness is identified in the programs (or lack thereof) provided in our public elementary and middle schools. Even in schools that have managed to retain some visual arts or music programs in the face of debilitating cuts to arts education budgets, the overwhelming majority of students in grades K-8 in LAUSD today receive no exposure to dance. The LA2050 report notes that as of 2011, LAUSD employed only 250 full-time elementary school arts teachers – for more than 600 elementary schools. We know that few, if any of these, are dance instructors. The U.S. Department of Education recently reported that while 94% of elementary schools offered music and 83% offered visual arts in the 2009-10 school year, only 3% offered dance. (danceusa.org/newsactionalerts.) LAUSD’s own Arts at the Core Resolution acknowledged the District’s current “inequality and opportunity gap” in arts education for youth in our City, where students in parts of the District attend schools that raise private funds to provide arts experiences for their students, while schools with predominantly Title I students have no such resources. We aim to change that. The positive impact of dance on learning and psycho-social development has been widely documented in academic research. Dance activities support the development of fluency, originality and critical thinking skills (Deasey, 2002), improve test scores, school attendance, responsibility, self-discipline, and --- just as importantly -- an understanding of delayed gratification and work ethic (Brooks Schmitz, 1990b). Dance helps combat the epidemic of childhood obesity and helps counter the impact of lack of park access for our children (as reported in LA2050, just 33% of children in LA live within ¼ mile of a park, compared to 91% in NYC and 65% in San Diego). “[The] odds of being overweight or obese increased relative to lower household income levels, less neighborhood access to parks and sidewalks, lower levels of physical activity, and more time spent watching TV or on the computer. Black and Latino children had higher rates of obesity and greater chances of being overweight than their non-Latino white counterparts, after researchers adjusted for socioeconomic and behavioral factors, and state of residence.” (“A New Map of Childhood Obesity in the U.S.,” L.A. Times, May 3, 2010.) Expanding opportunities for children in LA to engage in quality dance education will not only impact the future of the Arts & Cultural Vitality in LA, but directly impact Education (thereby also improving Income & Employment), Health, and Social Connectedness in our City.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
evolve.la
evolve.la 1 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

<p> evolve.la creates a conversation around the different social causes, while reconnecting to significant places and landmarks in Los Angeles. In addition, it engages the community to think about Los Angeles and how we can change the city for the better in the future, while encouraging a common goal of improving our cultural vitality and shared surroundings. </p> <p> At the end of the game, the winning indicator category raises awareness by benefiting a charity of choice relating to its cause. A portion of the budget for the game will be devoted to this donation. </p> <p> In addition, all the data collected from the game will be released in a case study that will present the measurable behavior of the users in the present, and how new technologies will change the evolution of our social connectedness in the future. </p>

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
f2 FutureFest LA
f2 FutureFest LA
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Los Angeles would benefit by hosting a unique annual world famous arts and entertainment event much like SXSW has done for Austin, Texas, the Venice Biennale has done for Venice, Italy and the Fringe Fest has done for Edinburgh, Scotland (which touts itself as the largest arts festival in the world). It would bring together the worlds of technology, entertainment and the arts and engage citizens of all ages to participate from across the city and globally. The artist and creative professionals will benefit by the publicity they will gain from participating in the f2, the tourism industry in LA will benefit and LA will stay at the cutting edge of creativity and technology due to being inspired to showcase this event each year.

See Idea Details
remind me
Wait! Your vote is pending.
volunteers housing the homeless
volunteers housing the homeless 15 Pink talk bubble tail
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

Getting fifteen chronically homeless people off the street and into permanent housing will (1) vastly reduce the amount of taxpayer money spent to take care of them IN the street -- in shelters, in emergency rooms and hospitals, in police stations and jails and prisons; (2) since the effort will be entirely volunteer and OF the community, it will draw the community as a whole into a closer relationship with the homeless generally and help to do away with the notion that we live in one world and they live in another; (3) it will save fifteen perfectly good people from a downward spiral from which most of us would be hard pressed to pull out and, in the case of a number of them, it will return them to a position of productivity alongside the rest of us: to jobs, to social and political interactions of all kinds, and (sure enough) to VOLUNTEERING to help others who are still on the downward spiral.

See Idea Details
remind me
Voting time hasn't begun.
Check back on [date]!

As the most common type of physical activity, walking is an easy and effective way to improve fitness. It reduces body fat and bad cholesterol, cutting the risk of some of the leading causes of death in Los Angeles. Walking extends life—walking 75 minutes per week adds 1.8 years of life; walking 2.5 hours per week adds 7 years of life. Walking regularly also improves mood and reduces fatigue. And these health benefits can also lead to larger social change. Walking increases our contact with our neighbors, builds social capital and civic awareness and puts more eyes on the street to reduce crime. In a city like L.A. with a diverse population but a history of social inequality and residential segregation, walking also allows people to explore new neighborhoods and can help reduce barriers of class, race, language and location. Walking also brings significant economic benefits. In other cities, studies show that streets that have received pedestrian improvements such as street porches, pedestrian plazas and traffic calming have often found a boost in sales. Property values are also higher in walkable neighborhoods than in comparable sprawling places. As living in a walkable area becomes more desirable, walkable cities have an easier time attracting businesses and people with ideas for starting new businesses. Despite what some ‘80s pop songs might say, Los Angeles has incredible potential to become one of the world’s most walkable cities. Even our reputation for sprawl works to our advantage: Los Angeles developed as a series of of neighborhoods connected by an interurban rail system, meaning that there are multiple historic downtowns and commercial corridors that provide interesting places to walk. We also have the fastest-growing transit system in the United States, a “walk extender” because it allows people to walk to a bus or train, take transit, then continue walking to destinations. A pedestrian advocacy movement is overdue in Los Angeles, yet the timing could not be better. The City has not addressed the funding and maintenance of its sidewalks in a comprehensive manner since the 1970s, but there is growing interest from the City and residents to change this. In the Fall of 2012, the City of Los Angeles hired its first-ever pedestrian staff as a result of leadership and advocacy from groups such as Los Angeles Walks. Walking events like the Great Los Angeles Walk, Big Parade and Secret Stairs have steadily increased in numbers over the last few years. And in the past year the local press have covered more walking-related stories, from Christopher Hawthorne’s recent series on L.A. boulevards in the Los Angeles Times to the LA Weekly’s focus on hit-and-run collisions. In a city where less than 20% of all trips are taken on foot or bike, we believe that even a small increase in awareness around the benefits of walking will have a dramatic impact across the city. We believe our campaign is perfectly timed to build upon this momentum.

See Idea Details
remind me

Pink ribbon award box icon 45b87e779c93f5099a48378c2aadc0fcd51184974daecf76e3f5c50034ea21fb
Award topvotedidea 5a5ae14e3d56a10363ea2a398cece46cf4df891213cbe68677c19d8903a1932a
$1,000,000 in total grants
Circle 1 inactive e7784182a1bd5eace578987db27fc19ec6337f418c48c6c8732605b9043d50d0 Step1 title submission inactive cde083e53089b973e7c9dc80a44a038c1ce4cf3b2650aeb5549157d1ed58a2d9

Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28, 2013
at 07:00 PM UTC

Circle 2 inactive 74a43088831beb43fdbd7591ef5d50a5a7a26ff92c9e8ed489782459fa31a8d9 Step2 title voting inactive 96be722f53c417edddb5742ba9a6dc2fd403f7e4f6c19dbe883d50d20d93689d

Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02, 2013

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
at 07:00 PM UTC

Circle 3 83da7a9432aeea960e1a9e9ee93e7ea1221af6c8f42b27964f2e9999d94b2b8d Step3 title 3d9e2a65d6ea1ad301f8fc607f5f828bd96362932c71d81c0da5b1fd964422b0
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08, 2013